U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > General U.S.
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 10-08-2019, 06:05 PM
 
33 posts, read 7,820 times
Reputation: 25

Advertisements

Quote:
Originally Posted by ssiguy View Post
1} Toronto for very obvious reasons.
2} Seattle
3} Montreal
4} Detroit

Both Calgary and Vancouver have slowed down. Their heyday was in the 2000-2010 period when Calgary was booming at an incredible rate and Vancouver was building en masse. Now with the oil price collapse Calgary has a massive glut of downtown office space and Vancouver's money laundering from China which fueled much of the boom has slowed greatly.

Montreal has hit it's stride again and hasn't seen economic or population growth rates at this level in over a generation. It's high tech sector is booming and one of the world's preeminent centres for AI. It also offers something Toronto and especially Vancouver don't...…………….affordable housing making it a magnet for young people.

Detroit started from a rock bottom standing but since it's bankruptcy it has done a complete 180. Detroit, although still having many problems, is in a very unique position in the Western world...……...it's basically starting from scratch. It is in a position to totally change economical & socially from a 20th century rust belt to a 21st century urban experiment.
2010 to 2020 has been Calgary's strongest decade overall, here are the highrise stats

Calgary
2000 to 2009
56 Built (7 over 100m)
Diagrams - SkyscraperPage.com

2010 to 2019
78 Built (25 over 100m)
Diagrams - SkyscraperPage.com

Vancouver still outpaced Calgary but slowed down in the current decade

Vancouver
2000 to 2009
188 Built (15 over 100m)
http://skyscraperpage.com/diagrams/?searchID=86644273

2010 to 2019
141 Built (19 over 100m)
http://skyscraperpage.com/diagrams/?searchID=86644281

And here is how Toronto and Montreal did:

Toronto
2000 to 2009
76 Built (21 over 100m)
http://skyscraperpage.com/diagrams/?searchID=86644224

2010 to 2019
474 Built (162 over 100m)
http://skyscraperpage.com/diagrams/?searchID=86644235


Montreal
2000 to 2009
66 Built (3 over 100m)
http://skyscraperpage.com/diagrams/?searchID=86644241

2010 to 2019
117 Built (19 over 100m)
http://skyscraperpage.com/diagrams/?searchID=86644254

Besides New York and Chicago, no other American city comes close to these Canadian cities over the last 10 years

Last edited by Trojan1982; 10-08-2019 at 06:23 PM..
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 10-09-2019, 09:36 AM
 
Location: Mexico City, formerly Columbus, Ohio
13,702 posts, read 13,867,728 times
Reputation: 6054
Quote:
Originally Posted by Huntsville_secede View Post
Nashville has to be included in this. It's transformed itself in the last several years to an upper tier city.
I'm not sure I agree that it's an "upper tier city". Nashville's growth is weird. It's seen a relatively decent amount of construction within the city, but population growth within the city/core county has been pretty small versus the overall metro. It grew by just 65,000 between 2010-2018, an average annual growth of just 8,200, and that is the number for just about all of Davidson County. It gets a lot of hype, but its growth is far more suburban than urban.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-09-2019, 10:54 AM
Status: "Bostonian in Baltimore" (set 15 days ago)
 
Location: Baltimore
3,122 posts, read 1,673,231 times
Reputation: 2719
Quote:
Originally Posted by mwj119 View Post
I think you can "feel the change" in Atlanta more than Boston, at least to me. Boston has pockets- Seaport most notably- that has grown more than any single neighborhood that comes to mind in ATL. There has probably been more construction in Boston too. But, think about the neighborhood shifts in ATL over the last decade.. Little Five Points, Old Fourth, Cabbagetown, Inman. Then add the Beltline, and what it's done for connectivity.

Just feels like ATL has evolved more. Boston is what it was, and will continue to be what it is. And, I'm not complaining at all.. I love the city. Just don't think it's even possible to inflict that level of change in Boston, as compared to the type of change ATL has seen in recent years. With the exception of Seaport, Boston has kind of bettered what it already had, while Atlanta has truly transformed.

Anyways, Seattle comes to mind. Austin has changed, as has Denver, but not quite like Seattle.
Strong disagreement on my part. Boston is very different from what it was just 10 years ago when you could buy a house 3 miles from downtown for 250k.

I dont focus on the seaport because no one was living there and it kind of isolated from the city in many ways. Im thinking parts of Roxbury East Boston Dorchester Allston South Boston and even places outside the city like Chelsea and East Somerville. Also the lack of families and the decrease incrime has been pretty poignant. Not nearly as much inner city despair as there was for a long time. Along with a decline in families much of the Boston feel from say Gone Baby Gone (2007) is jsu gone. Pretty much nothing in Boston is lowkey and the community feel gets eroded constantly. It feels less like a big town now than it did in 2010 when there was no construction and much less growth. Back then the T didn't tell you when a train was coming the silver line didnt go to Chelsea, charlie cards were still pretty new, several more traditional housing projects were up. City council had just elected it first ever woman of color, there was never a black BPD Comissioner. The MA-7th didnt exist. Blue bikes were hubway bikes and were scant. Many more local dive bars and irish pubs were open and doing pretty well. The list goes on.

The parts of Boston that were desirable have seen hyper development but the parts of the city that were very undesirable to an average American are now pretty clean and much more livable.

Last edited by BostonBornMassMade; 10-09-2019 at 11:48 AM..
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-09-2019, 03:28 PM
 
153 posts, read 107,548 times
Reputation: 371
2020-2029 is going to be LA
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-09-2019, 03:46 PM
 
Location: Thunder Bay, ON
2,643 posts, read 3,829,036 times
Reputation: 1680
Quote:
Originally Posted by jbcmh81 View Post
I'm not sure I agree that it's an "upper tier city". Nashville's growth is weird. It's seen a relatively decent amount of construction within the city, but population growth within the city/core county has been pretty small versus the overall metro. It grew by just 65,000 between 2010-2018, an average annual growth of just 8,200, and that is the number for just about all of Davidson County. It gets a lot of hype, but its growth is far more suburban than urban.
8,200 per year is pretty good for a small city, that's 1.3% yearly growth. The City of Toronto got 0.9% yearly growth between 2011 and 2016 by comparison. For Toronto though, that was all infill. Not sure how much is infill for Nashville, there does seem to be some greenfield development in the fringes of the city-county, especially in the SE corner like south of Antioch. There's a ton of new construction in the older neighbourhoods, but since a lot of that is demolishing old bungalows to built 1-2 bigger/new homes, I'm not sure how much the resulting net growth is.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-09-2019, 03:54 PM
 
33 posts, read 7,820 times
Reputation: 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by dozener View Post
2020-2029 is going to be LA
it still going to be Toronto by far. if anything 2020-2019 should be more impressive as some rules about height have been relaxed recently and many 200m+ Towers are approved and should be starting by 2023. 2020 to 2029 should be the decade Toronto finally tops Chicago skyline.

Here are all the proposed towers in Toronto which I expect all to start by 2023
http://skyscraperpage.com/diagrams/?searchID=86653808
221 above 100m+
25 above 200m+

and here is the for Los Angeles:
http://skyscraperpage.com/diagrams/?searchID=86653828
44 above 100m+
9 above 200m+

Lack of land and population growth means Toronto will not be slowing down anytime soon

Last edited by Trojan1982; 10-09-2019 at 04:02 PM..
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-09-2019, 04:13 PM
 
Location: The City of Brotherly Love
1,100 posts, read 770,328 times
Reputation: 2699
Philadelphia.

I was only 11 years old when Philly's growth rate turned positive for the first time in 2006, the first time in decades. Philly's outlook was bleak in the early-to-mid-2000s: the "Killadelphia" and "Philthadelphia" monikers were very much alive and well, Center City was much less lively, neighborhoods close to Center City were still reeling from decades of disinvestment, there was a higher level of violent crime, and the city was still experiencing an overall brain drain due to the failure to retain former college students who attended one of our multitude of colleges and universities. 2006 marked the beginning of an amazing air of change that would grip the city in the coming years.

2010-2019 has been a truly transformative time for Philly. First of all, our skyline has expanded in all directions: the tallest towers in West (FMC Tower), South (CHOP Tower), and North Philly (1324 N. Broad Street, aka The Nest) were all completed within the decade. Additionally, the Comcast Technology Center is now the tallest building in Philly, PA, and outside of NYC and Chicago. The Comcast Center was completed in 2008, so we've managed to push our skyline to new heights (no pun intended) in a relatively short period of time.

After taking in our beautiful skyline, one could observe the neighborhoods and notice that new homes are popping up in nearly every corner of the city. In the beginning, new homes began rising in neighborhoods close to Center City; however, this has become less true as all of the close-in neighborhoods have come close to being completely filled--save for Callowhill, which will really start to blossom in the 2020s. People are no longer afraid to buy a home west of 52nd Street in West Philly, above Girard Avenue in North Philly, and east of Front Street in the River Wards, and the associated neighborhoods and commercial corridors have been revitalized as a result. I have a feeling that Lower North Philly take off in the 2020s, as will certain north-of-Market neighborhoods in West Philly.

Our schools (public schools and universities other than Penn) have been getting better, our rate of job growth and venture capital investment has come to rival the metrics of other metros typically viewed as being ahead of us, a world-class restaurant scene has planted roots in Center City and beyond, poverty is down and incomes are up, we are on the forefront of becoming a center of gene therapy research, and our profile has risen on a national and international level. Don't believe me? Philadelphia has broken its record for tourism for a seventh straight year!

After small gains made in the mid-to-late-2000s, 2010-2019 turned out to represent a hugely positive paradigm shift for Philly. I can't wait to see what the 2020s will hold for my hometown!
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-09-2019, 04:23 PM
 
Location: Thunder Bay, ON
2,643 posts, read 3,829,036 times
Reputation: 1680
Quote:
Originally Posted by Trojan1982 View Post

Besides New York and Chicago, no other American city comes close to these Canadian cities over the last 10 years
Just because American cities aren't building as many highrises though, that doesn't mean they aren't growing much. Toronto for example has very little low rise growth, there's a decent amont of teardowns, but it's replacing 1 small house with 1 big house, so there's not much net growth there.

Miami is getting a lot of highrise development though, I'd say it's comparable to Montreal and Vancouver.

Seattle is getting almost as much highrise development as Calgary, but also TONNES of lowrise to midrise development. I think it might get about as much infill growth as Toronto or close this decade, despite being a smaller city.

Most American cities don't build a lot of highrises, but that doesn't mean they aren't growing much. Houston, Atlanta, Los Angeles, Portland, Washington and Austin are all getting a lot of midrise and sometimes lowrise development. The transformation in Houston is especially significant imo, a lot neighbourhoods are transforming from areas that have a bayou backwater vibe to tightly packed townhouses. Ex:
https://www.google.ca/maps/@29.80873...7i16384!8i8192
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-09-2019, 04:26 PM
 
Location: YVR - YYJ - YOW
298 posts, read 242,731 times
Reputation: 300
Quote:
Originally Posted by Natnasci View Post
Curious as to how you came to that conclusion?
EDIT: I just notice that your skyscraper link for Vancouver is missing Shangri-la which our tallest building at 201 metres, so it has me doubting the accuracy of all the links
That's because Shangri-La was built in 2008 and they were doing searches for builds and U/C from 2010-2019.

If you increase the search range to completion of U/C from 2010 to past 2020 on Skyscraperpage (one of the best resources on the web for this sort of information... with excellent illustrations too) the numbers are:

Toronto - 639

Vancouver - 159 (but really ~355, see below)

Montreal - 147

Calgary - 94

Ottawa - 45

Edmonton - 32

Halifax - 29

London - 25

Victoria - 19

Winnipeg - 13

Quebec - 10


Vancouver is actually unfairly underestimated because if you do a full search for all of BC you'd get 382 built or U/C from 2010 onwards:

https://skyscraperpage.com/diagrams/?searchID=86654027

This is because a bunch of cities that really should be considered part of Vancouver (Burnaby, Richmond, New Westminster, Surrey etc), just as all the suburbs of Calgary and Toronto are listed as Calgary and Toronto through amalgamation, are now included in this search. Subtract out the only other BC cities outside of Metro Van that have built or are building new skyscrapers (Victoria's 19 and Kelowna's 8) and you end up with approximately 355 for the GVRD.

Don't underestimate the insane building boom that went on in Vancouver over the past decade. Calgary can't even touch that, even when accounting for relative population sizes (Calgary being a little over 1/2 of Metro Vancouver).

That said, whatever happened in Toronto is truly transformational and gives Canada a tier 1 international skyline.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-09-2019, 04:30 PM
 
Location: Chibostoncaliseattle
2,295 posts, read 1,246,619 times
Reputation: 2034
Quote:
Originally Posted by BostonBornMassMade View Post
Strong disagreement on my part. Boston is very different from what it was just 10 years ago when you could buy a house 3 miles from downtown for 250k.
Where could you buy a house for $250k within 3 miles of downtown in 2009? Maybe Chelsea, Everett, Mattapan?

It was (almost) as expensive then, comparatively to the rest of the US, as it is now. Meteoric rises in housing costs aren't particularly unique to Boston/the MSA. Are the % gains higher than many other established cities? Sure, but well behind some others.. I would guess, as a %, it's fairly similar to ATL.

As for the rest of your statement, what has happened in Boston has happened in ATL. It just feels different in Atlanta because we are talking entire city area/neighborhoods East of 85. It is a different planet than it used to be. We're not talking tear downs like the ones we see in Dorchester.. We are talking wild and dramatic shifts that go beyond gentrification.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply

Quick Reply
Message:

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > General U.S.
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

© 2005-2019, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top