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Old 10-14-2019, 09:08 PM
 
Location: Thunder Bay, ON
2,643 posts, read 3,829,036 times
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Most of the US doesn't get feet and feet and snow. You'll get a couple inches, then it'll melt, then a couple weeks later you'll get a couple more inches. Some of the areas you're looking at get bigger snowfalls if they're in the mountains, but I think the winters would still be quite easy to get used to.

Snow isn't a bother as much as cold, and the temperatures there are still mostly in the 30s and 40s in the winter. If you walk at a fast pace while wearing a winter coat, you'll be sweating in temperatures as low as 20F so 30s and 40s isn't really uncomfortable. Also those areas are quite sunny in the winter unlike the Midwest and NE so that'll help keep it feeling warmer than the thermometer reading tells you, and also help melt and evaporate snow so that you're not stuck with slush and ice on the ground as much as you would in areas with cloudier winters.

Snow is mostly just a bother if you don't have winter tires, or if you keep your car outside and have to remove snow and ice frequently.
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Old 10-15-2019, 08:19 PM
 
Location: Minneapolis, MN
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I am from Miami and live in Minneapolis. I look forward to winter. So, if I can do it, so can you.
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Old 10-15-2019, 08:20 PM
 
Location: Minneapolis, MN
6,326 posts, read 3,640,499 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by new2colo View Post
Why would you move somewhere cold if you don't want to deal with cold weather? It's not like your choices are only 110 degree summers or a place that's frigid. There are plenty of places in the west that don't experience those kinds of extremes. I would recommend looking at Prescott, AZ or St. George, UT. You will experience cold during the winter, but you will not be socked in by feet of snow. It will take a little bit to acclimate, but you will get used to it as long as you have warm clothes.

She never said she doesn't want cold, she just said she doesn't want EXTREME.
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Old 10-15-2019, 08:24 PM
 
Location: Minneapolis, MN
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Natural510 View Post
We actually have trees and drinkable water here, so it's not all bad.



Not winter, but I visited SoCal in November 2017 and... subtropical vibrancy? LMAO. It's a desert. They act like it's Florida.
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Old 10-15-2019, 08:27 PM
 
Location: Minneapolis, MN
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tijlover View Post
^
Minneapolis cold gets an unfair rap, as I lived there for 21 years. Decades ago, in the middle of winter, I flew out to Washington DC, where the temps were higher, but the damp cold, I thought, was more cruel than the drier winter cold of Minneapolis. It was the kind of cold that went through you to the bones, which I didn't experience in Minneapolis.



Right. The cold rainy days we get in spring and fall can feel way more uncomfortable than the snowy winter days. The dry cold winter days are the best. It's a refreshing cold, not a damp cold.
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Old 10-19-2019, 01:57 PM
 
Location: North Idaho
23,475 posts, read 30,071,002 times
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The Californians complain a lot but I've never seen one lying dead at the side of the road from hypothermia, so I guess they adapt.


Their whining can get tiresome, though.
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Old 10-19-2019, 10:28 PM
 
Location: North Dakota
7,959 posts, read 9,366,831 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by EmmaZ View Post
I will be moving out of California next summer and I am considering Southern Utah, Northern Arizona, or Colorado. How hard is it to get used to cold and snow? I am tired of the heat and 110 degree summers, but I don’t want the other extreme, either. Everyone says California has the best climate, well I am trying to find the SECOND best climate. I have no experience with snow, I don’t mind a few inches, but can’t do feet and feet of snow. Is it possible to acclimate? And if so, how long does it take?
You'll be fine. Those places have plenty of mild days.
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Old 10-19-2019, 10:36 PM
 
Location: San Francisco/East Bay and Los Angeles, formerly DC and Boston
2,200 posts, read 3,497,312 times
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I grew up near Boston and never got used to the cold.
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Old 10-19-2019, 10:40 PM
 
Location: Tyler, TX
992 posts, read 727,906 times
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I’m an exception, because I grew up in NorCal but have Reynaud’s. Basically, my fingers and toes get a fraction of normal blood flow, so even mildly cold temps are actually painful.

That aside, the cold itself isn’t too hard to adapt to. Snow will actually be a bigger issue.
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Old 10-20-2019, 11:39 AM
 
Location: North Idaho
23,475 posts, read 30,071,002 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TheseGoTo11 View Post
I grew up near Boston and never got used to the cold.

But did you ever learn how to dress in layers, wear a sweater in the house, buy a good quality pair of snow boots and a nice winter hat to keep your head warm? Have someone teach you how to put chains on your car? Learn to keep several days worth of food in the house in preparation for storms and invest in a few candles for when the power was out?



Southern Californians who move to a cold location can sometimes figure that out. If they can't, they move away.


I see them at the local parking lot bundled up until they look like the Michelin tire man while I am walking around in a T-shirt, but all that warm clothing is adapting to the weather (of a sort).
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