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Old 10-15-2019, 12:51 PM
 
220 posts, read 93,110 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Natural510 View Post
occasional hick who may talk down to them by assuming an accent means they’re less intelligent.
Yeah, I get these ones once in a while....I give them trouble...
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Old 10-15-2019, 12:54 PM
 
Location: Pure Michigan!
4,384 posts, read 7,586,447 times
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I grew up in a small farming community in Northwest Ohio back in the '70s and '80s. My junior high art teacher was from England, our playground aide was from Germany. No one thought one thing about it and they were very well liked in the community. In fact, if anything, when you live in a homogenous little town like that, people from other countries are even more popular because they bring something new and relatively exotic to the community.

We also had Mexican families in town who originally started coming just seasonally to work as migrant workers and then found full-time jobs and stayed, and the Latino kids in our school were never looked down upon or treated badly because of their heritage. In fact, some of the Latino guys were "the guys" to get, the dreamboats, if you will.

And I have to say, and yes this is subjective, but I think the people in Midwest are the friendliest and most down to earth that I have met anywhere.
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Old 10-15-2019, 12:56 PM
 
220 posts, read 93,110 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Foamposite View Post
Nobody really complains about Eastern Euros in NYC and there are a lot of them. I don't even consider Poles to be Eastern European, but I never hear people complain about them either.
I see Poles got an upgrade to Western Euros....Polish are classical Eastern European. They're Western Slavs, but on the Euro-wide scale, they're Eastern European.
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Old 10-15-2019, 01:00 PM
 
2,649 posts, read 807,722 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by opossum1 View Post
Poland is by all means Eastern European, as Eastern European as it gets. It doesn't matter 1910 or 2019. EU membership has nothing to do with Western-ness of European country. Poland is of Slavic heritage and on the Eastern boundary of non-ex-Soviet Union euro countries. Polsha is markedly different from Western European countries.
It's in Central Europe geographically
Czech Republic isn't Eastern Euro either
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Old 10-15-2019, 01:08 PM
 
220 posts, read 93,110 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by snoopygirlmi View Post
Yeah - wow!

My state has a lot of immigrants who come here for different reasons. We have a huge Middle Eastern population, a huge Asian population, a lot of Europeans (Western and Eastern), a lot of Mexicans and other people from Latin America/South America.

Because I live in a border region (northern) we get a lot of Canadians who come over to work and play and then they go home again.

So - weird.... Sounds typically American to me.

Sometimes, I get frustrated if my doctor or nurse has a really thick accent and they are hard to understand because I want to understand what my health issue is. But that doesn't mean that I have any ill-will towards them.

A couple of years ago, I had an awkward incident with a doctor because as we were doing the typical banter, he said that he recently moved to the area. I asked where he was from. He looked at me kind of weird because he seemed concerned about where that was going (as he was a brown person). I explained that I wasn't talking about his ethnic background, but he said that he recently moved to town and I wondered where he moved from because I was curious. He loosened up after that. I can only assume that he had some bad incidents and I felt bad that I made him feel uncomfortable. I never thought that asking a simple question like that could make someone super uncomfortable like that. I was just trying to be welcoming.

I think it's sad that some are assuming that people in the South or Midwest can't be decent human beings to other people.

Honestly, a lot of people are just jerks to other people, regardless of whether they are immigrant or not, because they are sad, bitter people. And where someone lives really doesn't have anything to do with it.

Nobody simply gets along with everyone. There's always "that person" - the person who rubs you the wrong way and you just can't tolerate them and they probably are a decent person, but for whatever reason, you just don't mesh.

But now I'm rambling......
I get this question (where are you from?) asked endlessly by everyone, their mama and their dog, asked without my prelude or bothering to get to know me first or even trying to make some conversation first.
I respond mentioning the US town I traveled from, which often gets followed by no, no you're not from America, where are you REALLY from? Or well but you have accent, you're not from America (I've been here for decades now).
These people shouldn't be surprised if they're shown some teeth in response.
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Old 10-15-2019, 01:10 PM
 
220 posts, read 93,110 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Foamposite View Post
It's in Central Europe geographically
Czech Republic isn't Eastern Euro either
Polish are Eastern European folks, I disagree. Normally there's Western and Eastern Europe division. With adding Central Europe region designation, yes, they can be fitted into that, but normally it's just Western-Eastern. When people think of Eastern Europeans normally it's about former Eastern Block countries.
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Old 10-15-2019, 01:17 PM
 
220 posts, read 93,110 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bluefox View Post
You’d be surprised. There were a decent amount of immigrants from the northern Baltic states, especially Lithuania, as well as Eastern European (Ukraine mostly) and Balkan (Serbia and Croatia mostly) in the exurban/rural part of Northern Indiana I grew up in. More than you would think. My grandparents always bought these amazing pies from a first generation Russian lady who owned a bakery in their tiny town of about 3,000.

That being said, these immigrants were all part of larger groups and sort of were a community within a community. As a single immigrant without that sort of support structure I imagine it might be somewhat lonely in many parts of rural America, not just the South or Midwest. But that could also be said for other Americans who come there from other places, especially urban or suburban areas.
I don't know if it's lonely as a solo immigrant in rural places....I think it depends on personality.
I'm a hermit by nature, though - wouldn't say I'd feel any more "lonely" (not that I ever feel this way in general) in my home country vs. rural or urban US. May be I've lived here alone for too long and forgot what it's like to live among my original countrymen. I know when I visited my home country I felt terribly scared; I'm not into international travel and it felt like a visit to a strange foreign country (even though I lived there until age 24!). Here, in the US, I feel zero need for a community of people speaking my native language/from my home country. I find I disagree with a lot of values of people of my original cultural heritage and find these things to be unacceptable for me and way backwards even compared to some of most hardcore US rural uber-conservative values.
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Old 10-15-2019, 01:24 PM
 
220 posts, read 93,110 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Foamposite View Post
I'm not racist at all but what they're saying is true. Nobody looks down on white European immigrants of any sort. Even Trump himself asked why more Norwegian people couldn't come to the US.
Well, Trump gets all his wives from there so it's understandable.
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Old 10-15-2019, 01:27 PM
 
220 posts, read 93,110 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by fzmk View Post
English language. is a global language with many accents. E.g accents: New York, Boston, Southern US, Texas, California, British, Scottish, Wales, Australian, New Zealand, continental Europe, from India, from Asia etc. Racism .... because of the accent? Another reason to hate? C`mon.
Yes, many accents - but in some small towns people never really heard any other accent except the local one. Yep, one can get stared at in a small town even if looks very conventional-American... There're a few towns out there which don't really get visited by any tourists and not near a major highway, while locals don't really get to travel outside the county.
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Old 10-15-2019, 01:32 PM
 
220 posts, read 93,110 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bert_from_back_East View Post
A sizable share of older Americans in the rural Midwest and rural Northeast had parents or grandparents that originated in Europe, primarily Germany, Italy, Poland and Scandinavia. Therefore, there are many older people living in those regions of America who had close relatives that were immigrants and likely spoke English with foreign accents, although most of those ancestors have been deceased for many years. In conclusion, I highly doubt people in the rural Midwest would harbor any animosity towards European immigrants, given the ethnic composition of the geographic region. And depending upon where a European immigrant originates, that immigrant's foreign accent and customs may be nostalgic for older Americans, reminding them of their late parents or grandparents. For example, my mother is often nostalgic for her late paternal grandparents, who were Italian immigrants, when she meets someone who is from Italy and will always exclaim, "Whoosy reminds me so much of my grandfather/grandmother!"
I see - you had explained this very well. From things I read about the history of various regions it seems like Midwest has more mixed European heritage in the White part of their population versus, say, the South (more Scottish, English and Irish heritage there) or New England.
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