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Old 10-09-2019, 02:37 PM
 
238 posts, read 94,704 times
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I had been on a long all-over-US trip (still ongoing) and had a conversation with a Southerner who ended up moving up North to New England, mainly because of them not accepting existing culture in the South including being quite liberal politically. This person had claimed that since I have a foreign accent (I'm an immigrant from Northern Europe) I'd experience either hostility or lack of acceptance in the Southern states (even though people may hide it and it not be right in-my-face). For example, when I mentioned friendliness of strangers (waving, etc) in one particular Southern town, this person had told me "Do you think they'd be friendly towards you if they heard you accent?"

I know there's certain truth to this, from my past experience of living in the South (but it was very long time ago) - and in some places in the South people just don't really like anyone who's not local, frankly.

I wonder if many people in the South generally dislike encountering someone with an accent?
I wonder the same thing about Midwest - as Midwest, just like the South doesn't have a lot of immigrants and people are less used to them or to the accents.

I can understand how some people may dislike foreign accents. To be honest, I, myself, grew to dislike them after decades in the States...I like to hear American accents but dislike almost any foreign accent (it might have to do with noisy European tourists arriving late to my favorite National Parks, which seem to be flooded by them now, and making much inconsiderate noise).
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Old 10-09-2019, 03:36 PM
 
Location: Minneapolis, Minnesota
1,453 posts, read 1,257,761 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by opossum1 View Post
I wonder the same thing about Midwest - as Midwest, just like the South doesn't have a lot of immigrants and people are less used to them or to the accents.


The Midwest has immigrants. If you live in a city, you will encounter immigrants. Lots of them.
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Old 10-09-2019, 03:48 PM
 
2,468 posts, read 1,218,988 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by opossum1 View Post
I had been on a long all-over-US trip (still ongoing) and had a conversation with a Southerner who ended up moving up North to New England, mainly because of them not accepting existing culture in the South including being quite liberal politically. This person had claimed that since I have a foreign accent (I'm an immigrant from Northern Europe) I'd experience either hostility or lack of acceptance in the Southern states (even though people may hide it and it not be right in-my-face). For example, when I mentioned friendliness of strangers (waving, etc) in one particular Southern town, this person had told me "Do you think they'd be friendly towards you if they heard you accent?"

I know there's certain truth to this, from my past experience of living in the South (but it was very long time ago) - and in some places in the South people just don't really like anyone who's not local, frankly.

I wonder if many people in the South generally dislike encountering someone with an accent?
I wonder the same thing about Midwest - as Midwest, just like the South doesn't have a lot of immigrants and people are less used to them or to the accents.

I can understand how some people may dislike foreign accents. To be honest, I, myself, grew to dislike them after decades in the States...I like to hear American accents but dislike almost any foreign accent (it might have to do with noisy European tourists arriving late to my favorite National Parks, which seem to be flooded by them now, and making much inconsiderate noise).
If you think an immigrant would be unique in the Midwest, you would be wrong. Plenty of them here.
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Old 10-09-2019, 04:49 PM
 
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I should clarify this question pertained to rural and small town places.
In such areas, in both the South and the Midwest, I saw pretty much no immigrants, so yes, I felt quite different from the locals. In fact, in many places it was clear that the locals were all born and bred there with few newcomers from other states.

(I know that big cities have a few immigrants everywhere now)
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Old 10-09-2019, 05:14 PM
 
2,468 posts, read 1,218,988 times
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Originally Posted by opossum1 View Post
I should clarify this question pertained to rural and small town places.
In such areas, in both the South and the Midwest, I saw pretty much no immigrants, so yes, I felt quite different from the locals. In fact, in many places it was clear that the locals were all born and bred there with few newcomers from other states.

(I know that big cities have a few immigrants everywhere now)
I would guess that rural and small towns in the entire country, have fewer immigrants than the cities...obviously. Not quite sure what you're trying to get at here, but small town, born and bred, exist in every state. Immigrants...maybe, maybe not. This goes for the entire country.
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Old 10-09-2019, 05:22 PM
 
238 posts, read 94,704 times
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Originally Posted by Enean View Post
I would guess that rural and small towns in the entire country, have fewer immigrants than the cities...obviously. Not quite sure what you're trying to get at here, but small town, born and bred, exist in every state. Immigrants...maybe, maybe not. This goes for the entire country.
The original question was how people in those places tend to feel about accents/newcomers from Europe.
I was curious if it was really true what that Southern expat had told me that supposedly, those hand-waving Appalachian small town people wouldn't be so friendly to me if they heard my accent.
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Old 10-09-2019, 05:31 PM
 
2,468 posts, read 1,218,988 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by opossum1 View Post
The original question was how people in those places tend to feel about accents/newcomers from Europe.
I was curious if it was really true what that Southern expat had told me that supposedly, those hand-waving Appalachian small town people wouldn't be so friendly to me if they heard my accent.
Who knows? Some, maybe, some not. Everyone is different, and to try to stereotype any group, living anywhere, is just an exercise in futility. In my neighborhood in a small town in central Wisconsin, I live next door to immigrants, have an extremely liberal neighbor to the north of me, and a fundamentalist Christian to the east of our house. People don't walk in lockstep anywhere.......
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Old 10-09-2019, 05:36 PM
 
238 posts, read 94,704 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Enean View Post
Who knows? Some, maybe, some not. Everyone is different, and to try to stereotype any group, living anywhere, is just an exercise in futility. In my neighborhood in a small town in central Wisconsin, I live next door to immigrants, have an extremely liberal neighbor to the north of me, and a fundamentalist Christian to the east of our house. People don't walk in lockstep anywhere.......
Well those friendly Appalachians certainly were waving and greeting in lockstep.... would be pretty disheartening that they'd change this behavior solely based on someone's accent (and not even Northern accent, haha) - as that person had told they definitely would. I didn't have a lot of communication with real insiders of Southern life, so far (other than Louisiana, which is a thing in itself and not like other Southern states). This person was pretty jaded about the whole South painting with broad brush perhaps (or perhaps telling the truth). As to Wisconsin....I heard good things about it in this regard and I was approached by very friendly people while camping there, who talked to me a lot.
Some places (I saw this kind of towns in WV) definitely just don't like outsiders in general and one can get stared at, so some of this stuff is out there. I guess it really should be varying from town to town.

Last edited by opossum1; 10-09-2019 at 05:46 PM..
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Old 10-09-2019, 07:02 PM
 
Location: A Yankee in northeast TN
11,148 posts, read 14,804,476 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by opossum1 View Post
Well those friendly Appalachians certainly were waving and greeting in lockstep.... would be pretty disheartening that they'd change this behavior solely based on someone's accent (and not even Northern accent, haha) - as that person had told they definitely would. I didn't have a lot of communication with real insiders of Southern life, so far (other than Louisiana, which is a thing in itself and not like other Southern states). This person was pretty jaded about the whole South painting with broad brush perhaps (or perhaps telling the truth). As to Wisconsin....I heard good things about it in this regard and I was approached by very friendly people while camping there, who talked to me a lot.
Some places (I saw this kind of towns in WV) definitely just don't like outsiders in general and one can get stared at, so some of this stuff is out there. I guess it really should be varying from town to town.
First of all, quit listening to stupid people.
As someone who moved to one of those Appalachian towns I can say that for the most part they aren't any different than people anywhere else when it comes to 'outsiders' and there is no particular prejudice against 'different' accents. What I have come across is from some of the people who are from the very rural areas is a level of curiosity about people and customs that are unfamiliar to them. So if someone talks with an unfamiliar accent or language, or dresses in a manner they've never seen in person before they might get some looks, maybe even some questions. If someone wants to interpret that as being hostile that's on them.
I am reminded of the long ago post from a woman who claimed that she felt tricked about southern hospitality when she wasn't welcomed with open arms after she plopped herself down at a table with a woman and her family, after a friendly smile and a hello in a fast food line.
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Old 10-09-2019, 07:14 PM
 
Location: South to West
652 posts, read 174,860 times
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That ex-Southerner sounds like an idiot. Sure, there are a lot of fake people around but I don't think rural types would turn against a person upon hearing an accent, especially if they're European.
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