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Old 10-18-2019, 12:58 PM
 
2,649 posts, read 807,722 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BostonBornMassMade View Post
not really. Mostly they are in the process of creating their own urban Latino culture. The main ones into black culture are really just hanging out in the street with young black drug dealers and they deal drugs. Just yesterday day walking down an alley to my house i walked by a bunch of young hispanic guys in their mid 20s -no black ppl around-and they were all speaking Spanish. I see little kids of different races palying together.But the small Hispanic population of Baltimore lives in areas that are heavily Hispanic and seem to create their own culture, they definitely dont assimilate int black Baltimore culture in general-and certainly not the adult culture. I dont think ive ever seen a black adult in Baltimore and Hispanic adult in Baltimore be friendly-not tin the year ive been here. Most of my black neighbors constantly blame the Hispanics for trash and rodent problems and call them all 'Mexicans' even though there usually not mexican and try to make that known. They talk about hispanics real bad. Which was a culture shock to me coming from Boston.
But even Puerto Ricans and Dominicans in New York mostly hang out with other Hispanics. I know a Dominican guy who looks like Fat Joe and talks and dresses exactly like a black New Yorker (he even wears a du rag despite having straight hair), but his entire friend group is Hispanic. This kind of thing seems pretty common. Less so for Mexicans and Central Americans, but a lot of them are like that too (using the N word a lot, AAVE, fashion, only listening to hip hop, etc.).

What are you referring to by "their own urban culture"? I haven't seen any instance in modern times of US born Hispanics (of any type) in the US having their own "urban underclass" kind of culture. They seem to have the "black copycat" thing going on everywhere.

If they're in their 20s and speaking mostly Spanish, they're probably immigrants.
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Old 10-18-2019, 12:59 PM
 
2,649 posts, read 807,722 times
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Originally Posted by BostonBornMassMade View Post
I dont even know what Chicano actually means. I learned what Tejano is but idk what Chicano is althoguh i know it is a thing in places where there are mexicans...
Chicano means US born people of Mexican descent. AKA Mexican-Americans
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Old 10-18-2019, 01:07 PM
Status: "Bostonian in Baltimore" (set 15 days ago)
 
Location: Baltimore
3,124 posts, read 1,675,126 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Foamposite View Post
But even Puerto Ricans and Dominicans in New York mostly hang out with other Hispanics. I know a Dominican guy who looks like Fat Joe and talks and dresses exactly like a black New Yorker (he even wears a du rag despite having straight hair), but his entire friend group is Hispanic. This kind of thing seems pretty common. Less so for Mexicans and Central Americans, but a lot of them are like that too (using the N word a lot, AAVE, fashion, only listening to hip hop, etc.).

What are you referring to by "their own urban culture"? I haven't seen any instance in modern times of US born Hispanics (of any type) in the US having their own "urban underclass" kind of culture. They seem to have the "black copycat" thing going on everywhere.

If they're in their 20s and speaking mostly Spanish, they're probably immigrants.
I dunno.. I live on a 80% Hispanics street and they seem to be mostly immigrant parents and kids. I just haven't seen much evidence of Hispanics adopting black culture in Baltimore in the 15 months ive been here. Just haven't seen that. I see avoidance form Hispanics mostly and some antagonism from black people.

Based on what black neighbors have told me and census info i think the Hispanic population in Baltimore is too small and new to say for sure that they assimilate into black culture.
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Old 10-18-2019, 01:14 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BostonBornMassMade View Post
I dunno.. I live on a 80% Hispanics street and they seem to be mostly immigrant parents and kids. I just haven't seen much evidence of Hispanics adopting black culture in Baltimore in the 15 months ive been here. Just haven't seen that. I see avoidance form Hispanics mostly and some antagonism from black people.

Based on what black neighbors have told me and census info i think the Hispanic population in Baltimore is too small and new to say for sure that they assimilate into black culture.
I think they've been in the DC area for a bit longer. I guess just look to them to see what will come of the Baltimore born Hispanics
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Old 10-18-2019, 01:32 PM
 
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Originally Posted by SunGrins View Post
We seem to be mostly talking about cities, To find deeper cultural differences one has to get outside of the major cities, suburbs, and population centers where sameness is imposed by corporate brands and the common media. Corporations call those places markets and they work to keep the residents (AKA customers) in line with their media and product offerings. That can be all types of fast food outlets where people eat mostly the same thing, or the same big box stores, Walgreens and CVS on street corners, Wal-Mart, or Costco. We even have big-box churches where 10,000 people or more show up for Sunday services. We tend to do things the same when that is what is offered and other people are doing the same thing. That is mostly what we see out of the car windshield or walking down the city street. A lot of what we see is superficial.

Within cities there are more or less defined ethnic or racial enclaves where one will find cultural differences in an urban setting and sometimes those influences are strong enough to make a city seem slightly different. Miami is one example. Maybe the Asian influence in Seattle is an example or the Chinese influence in San Francisco. History plays a part in places like New Orleans, Santa Fe/Albuquerque, Charleston, or parts of New England.

I lived 35 years in a Midwestern town that grew from around 35k to 50k. It was small enough at first that many of the people were somehow related. As an example, my secretary and I were 1st cousins once removed to the same people but we were not related. Pizza Hut and McDonalds were already there but once it hit that 50k population benchmark it was inundated with Olive Garden, Red Lobster, Lowes, Home Depot, Barnes & Noble, Applebees, Chiles, and a dozen or more other major commercial outlets. The local neighborhood restaurants or stores withered away in many cases. The transition to the superficial corporate culture was well on its way when I moved away. The German-Catholic-Farmer-Good0ldBoy-Riverboat culture was still there but it was no longer as apparent. You had to look for it behind the corporate façade that smacked you in the face. You were still expected to stop and pull over when a funeral passed by. Horse breeding, country ham, the county fair, high school football, and holiday parades down High Street were still a "thing".
85% of the country's population lives in urban or suburban areas, so that is most relevant in my opinion.

Also, I find that cities have a GREATER diversity of non-chain restaurants compared to rural and exurban areas.
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Old 10-18-2019, 02:16 PM
 
15,102 posts, read 8,114,010 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Foamposite View Post
85% of the country's population lives in urban or suburban areas, so that is most relevant in my opinion.

Also, I find that cities have a GREATER diversity of non-chain restaurants compared to rural and exurban areas.

I believe rural is 19.3%. The suburbs are also very socioeconomically segregated most places. You have a pretty big chunk of the suburbs that aren't largely college educated. The culture of working class suburbs is different from the professional bedroom towns.
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Old 10-21-2019, 02:49 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mosep View Post
The OP needs to head down to Southern Louisiana
I agree, even within states there are alot of cultural diffferences. The biology of various regions can determine culture no matter the people. I live around Spanish moss, water cypress trees, seafood. Even alot of the fast food, stuff like kfc, bojangles is just inferior stuff to what grandma made. I go to Iowa and see stuff I never see like cider bars. Very cool.
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Old 10-21-2019, 06:57 PM
 
2,649 posts, read 807,722 times
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Originally Posted by vacommonwealth View Post
I agree, even within states there are alot of cultural diffferences. The biology of various regions can determine culture no matter the people. I live around Spanish moss, water cypress trees, seafood. Even alot of the fast food, stuff like kfc, bojangles is just inferior stuff to what grandma made. I go to Iowa and see stuff I never see like cider bars. Very cool.
We have cider bars here in New York.
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Old 10-21-2019, 07:56 PM
 
Location: North Carolina
469 posts, read 151,102 times
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Culture shock can varies depending on the person, the religion, ethnicity and how well-traveled the individual is. Most of my travels as a kid were along the i-95 corridor so anything on the east coast, for the most part, is going to feel home to me. Being an NYC native it was apparent how different NY'ers were from the rest of the country with the excessive use of public transportation, stores being open weeee hours in the morning, and most of the residents living in apartments instead of houses. When i visited Buffalo NY, it was pretty different from downstate NY. They call soda pop, the accent has is a more Great lake/NCVS accent versus the New York accent. When I moved to rural NC it was a clear difference in cultural direction between northern and southern with NC with white people saying y'all, drinking sweet tea was common, college sports being a big deal, and talking to strangers is encouraged. Now living here in Jacksonville Florida for a little over a month I can say it's not too different from the town I moved from in NC but I do feel like I'm in another environment with Publix being a big-deal, Palm trees everywhere, sidewalks, public buses, and words like ghit being used here. The difference from Jacksonville, FL and Hamlet NC (town i moved from) is more urban vs rural since both towns are within the South but thee biggest cultural shock I found living in Florida is that many people never saw snow (flurries don't really count). In NC while winters are generally warm it does snow quite a bit. Back in January of 2018, it went down to the single digits in Hamlet (despite being in southern Piedmont). As someone who has lived up and down the east coast, it's going to feel weird not having to be snowed in.
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Old 10-21-2019, 08:16 PM
 
Location: North Carolina
469 posts, read 151,102 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BostonBornMassMade View Post
Strongly disagree that these things are restricted to people 12-23. Even if it were that is the way people grow up and it shapes a lot of their perspective as adults. Speech music and dress is a huge part of culture regardless.

A lot of what I’m talking about is in regard to people in their 30s and 40s. In my baltimore neighborhood I walk by tons of Central American guys with paint and stains all over their work clothes. Drinking Coronas on the steps. They’re short and unconcerned with fashion and don’t speak a lot of English. I can legitimately say I never saw scenes such as that growing up in Boston which has 4c as many Hispanic. I never saw hispanic day laborer groups in the city (not to say they didn’t exist) but it’s the dominant culture in Baltimore. I never saw Hispanics at Home Depot waiting for work in Boston or Hartford-only when I moved to DC and Baltimore . It seems they operate pretty differently economically-the men at least.
Hispanic culture is pretty new the states below the Mason-Dixion line. Once you get south of New Castle county Delaware the Hispanic influence changes significantly from a more nuyorican dominance to a more Mexican/Central American influence. When I was in NC I noticed that to. You had Purto Ricans and Dominicans up there but they were mostly recently arrived rather than the ones you see in the Northeast. In the Carolinas, the Hispanics were mostly Mexicans. Now living here in Jacksonville, FL I see a lot more Puerto Ricans than I did in NC, but the Ricans here do speak more Spanish than the ones do up north. I know Orlando is known for having Nyoricans from the northeast but I haven't been down there since 2011 and I only visited the touristy parts of Orlando so I didn't really get to see the local culture.
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