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Old 10-14-2019, 01:06 AM
 
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It strikes me as surprising that Arizona, a more southern state known for its vast deserts and inhospitable heat has 6 National Forests while Nevada, a state that borders Oregon and Idaho with the northwestern part of the State basically part of the Pacific Northwest, only has 1.
Oh and New Mexico actually has 4 that I count. Nevada actually seems to be the only state west of Kansas to have any less than 4. I guess that makes Nevada the most desert covered state.
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Old 10-14-2019, 01:47 AM
Status: "Coffee is at least 3 of my food groups" (set 8 days ago)
 
Location: Chi > DC > Reno > SEA
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Well, the Humboldt-Toiyabe National Forest IIRC isn't all contiguous; they just decided to make it all one national forest for some reason. And it covers a large area (maybe it's just all one biome whereas Oregon's, Idaho's, and New Mexico's forests are all in different biomes, so they're considered different forests?).
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Old 10-14-2019, 05:10 AM
 
Location: Cebu, Philippines
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You can't just count them numerically and assume they are all the same size. Many are divided into separate units and administered as one. Wisconsin has very little, because the state keeps most of the forest under it's control.

Some are private land, like in Texas and North Carolina.
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Old 10-14-2019, 09:04 AM
 
Location: Jupiter, FL
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cebuan View Post
You can't just count them numerically and assume they are all the same size. Many are divided into separate units and administered as one. Wisconsin has very little, because the state keeps most of the forest under it's control.

You're trying explain science to a liberal. Better save your effort.
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Old 10-14-2019, 01:26 PM
 
Location: Oklahoma
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There is also probably more forest in Arizona than there is in the other two states due to the amount of forest on the Mogollon Rim.
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Old 10-14-2019, 03:22 PM
 
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Look at a topographic map. Arizona and New Mexico are all part of the Rocky Mountain ranges and have a lot more elevation variations and greenery.

Nevada outside of a few small pockets is flat and barren

The rain shadow of the cascades is quit significant.

Most people are quite surprised that Oregon has more desert per square mile than forested. Even Idaho has a lot of desert
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Old 10-14-2019, 05:16 PM
 
Location: Albuquerque, New Mexico
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New Mexico actually has five national forests that are headquartered and entirely located within the state:

Carson National Forest, headquartered in Taos

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Carson_National_Forest



Cibola National Forest, headquartered in Albuquerque

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cibola_National_Forest



Gila National Forest, headquartered in Silver City

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gila_National_Forest



Lincoln National Forest, headquartered in Alamogordo

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lincoln_National_Forest



Santa Fe National Forest, headquartered in Santa Fe

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sant...ational_Forest



Additionally, the Apache-Sitgreaves and Coronado national forests partially extend into New Mexico, but are mostly located in Arizona.

All pics above are from Wikipedia.
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Old 10-14-2019, 05:19 PM
 
Location: Tempe, AZ
4,794 posts, read 3,888,616 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ajonesaz View Post
Look at a topographic map. Arizona and New Mexico are all part of the Rocky Mountain ranges and have a lot more elevation variations and greenery.

Nevada outside of a few small pockets is flat and barren

The rain shadow of the cascades is quit significant.

Most people are quite surprised that Oregon has more desert per square mile than forested. Even Idaho has a lot of desert
It’s not the cascades, it’s the Sierra Nevadas.
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Old 10-14-2019, 06:59 PM
509
 
3,298 posts, read 4,252,482 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by KoNgFooCj View Post
It strikes me as surprising that Arizona, a more southern state known for its vast deserts and inhospitable heat has 6 National Forests while Nevada, a state that borders Oregon and Idaho with the northwestern part of the State basically part of the Pacific Northwest, only has 1.
Oh and New Mexico actually has 4 that I count. Nevada actually seems to be the only state west of Kansas to have any less than 4. I guess that makes Nevada the most desert covered state.
Only Congress can make a National Forest.

The Forest Service can, however, combine National Forests into administrative units. Unless Congress has acted, Nevada still has its original complement of National Forests.

The decrease in funding for National Forests has lead to the consolidation of Congressionally Designated National Forests into administrative units.

Historically, the Forest Service generated enough revenue from its activities to return money to the Federal treasury. The Congressional direction shifted from multiple use, including commodity outputs, the focus has shifted to mitigating the loss of natural habitats on private lands, by changing the management of the National Forests.

Congress has also has passed Legislation limiting the fees the Forest Service can charge permit holders. So due to Congressional direction much of the fees paid by ranchers, recreationists, ski areas, and telecommunications companies at below market rates.

For example, by LAW, the Forest Service can only charge 50% of the fair market value for cell towers.

We do have, “the best government money can buy”......YOUR CONGRESS sold it.
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Old 10-14-2019, 09:36 PM
 
1,184 posts, read 376,609 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ajonesaz View Post
Look at a topographic map. Arizona and New Mexico are all part of the Rocky Mountain ranges and have a lot more elevation variations and greenery.

Nevada outside of a few small pockets is flat and barren

The rain shadow of the cascades is quit significant.

Most people are quite surprised that Oregon has more desert per square mile than forested. Even Idaho has a lot of desert
Actually, Nevada appears to be the *least* flat state in maybe the whole country besides West Virginia. By this I mean the state most covered by mountainous terrain and with the least amount of flat plain land. I use Google Maps terrain view.
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