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Old 10-16-2019, 12:04 PM
 
7,839 posts, read 9,685,815 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jennifat View Post
In what UNIVERSE is Illinois or Indiana in the Upper Midwest? No. Sorry, no.

Maybe (and that's a very indecisive maybe) Rockford and Chicagoland can be lumped in with the Upper Midwest, but the rest of Illinois is absolutely not Upper Midwestern.
Have to agree here,as I think Chicago is the absolute lowest point of the Upper Midwest ( if such a thing was actually tracked). Chicago has more in common with Milwaukee, and points north, than the rest of Illinois..
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Old 10-16-2019, 12:17 PM
 
2,466 posts, read 1,218,988 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MassVt View Post
Have to agree here,as I think Chicago is the absolute lowest point of the Upper Midwest ( if such a thing was actually tracked). Chicago has more in common with Milwaukee, and points north, than the rest of Illinois..
Very true. South of Chicago, in Illinois, it's definitely more like Indiana.
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Old 10-16-2019, 12:40 PM
 
Location: Maryland
4,361 posts, read 5,657,372 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MassVt View Post
Have to agree here,as I think Chicago is the absolute lowest point of the Upper Midwest ( if such a thing was actually tracked). Chicago has more in common with Milwaukee, and points north, than the rest of Illinois..
Chicago (the city) is kind of its own thing...a bit like Milwaukee (the city), but far more dense, cosmopolitan, and faster-paced than anywhere in the Midwest, mostly on the prairie (like most of Illinois or Indiana or even a large part of Minnesota), surrounded by a lot of anywhere-in-the-Midwest suburbs, and not really like much of the rural population of most Midwestern states, including those of the Upper or Lower Midwest.
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Old 10-16-2019, 07:56 PM
 
Location: FW, Indiander
923 posts, read 1,348,979 times
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North Dakota, even with the winters.
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Old 10-16-2019, 10:24 PM
 
Location: Somewhere below Mason/Dixon
6,823 posts, read 7,713,309 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mr roboto View Post
Illinois is not upper Midwest.

The contenders for best state have to be Michigan, Wisconsin and Minnesota. Detroit is the biggest city. Minnesota has the better economy. Wisconsin has cheese.

Kidding (kind of). There are far more similarities than differences in these states. Farmland in the south, lakes to the north. Warm humid summers, cold dry winters. Wisconsin and Michigan have larger secondary cities. Minnesota is dominated by MSP (although it’s still a 50/50 urban/rural state). Minnesota is more geographically isolated. There’s a good argument to be made, however, that MSP has outpaced Milwaukee because of this - Milwaukee feels more like a rust belt city where as Minneapolis feels more modern. All the talent and small town kids from hundreds of miles in any direction of MSP go there for school/jobs etc.

Living in a Detroit suburb vs Milwaukee vs Minneapolis would be virtually indistinguishable. Same for picking a small town in any of these 3 states. Cultures will be similar enough as well.
Minneapolis is the best city in the Midwest. It is clean, safe and offers a lot. Some of the rest of Minnesota could be seen as a bit less than interesting. The north woods of Minnesota however are very pretty.

Michigan is blessed with the most striking scenery of the three states with places like sleeping bear dunes or picture rocks in Northern Michigan. No state in America has as many lakes, and it by far has the most Great Lake shores. Michigan however is saddled with places like Detroit and Flint and its economic dependency on auto manufacturers. Most Michigan people live near these embattled communities and they also live far from the beautiful areas of their state. The southern third of Michigan looks a lot like Indiana.

Wisconsin has much of the beauty of northern Michigan and its cities are cleaner and nicer than Michigan’s are. I believe overall Wisconsin is the nicest upper Midwest state. It offers the best all around upper Midwest experience. If I were looking to move to that region I would choose Wisconsin.
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Old 10-17-2019, 12:13 AM
 
Location: Greeneville, tn
46 posts, read 4,694 times
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Virginian or West Virginian would be a good area to look at and not real exspensive.
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Old 10-17-2019, 12:34 AM
 
Location: WA Desert, Seattle native
6,184 posts, read 4,108,566 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mjlo View Post
I’d say Michigan is pretty upper Midwest culturally downstate as well.
Yes, I am surprised downstate Michigan isn't mentioned much on this thread. Definitely considered upper midwest. I am somewhat partial to the area, especially Western Michigan where my Dad grew up. Just some great folk there overall. Grand Rapids is a true gem in an otherwise somewhat down-trodden State over the decades. But I have hope for what appears to be a Detroit renaissance.
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Old 10-17-2019, 06:01 AM
 
Location: Somewhere below Mason/Dixon
6,823 posts, read 7,713,309 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by pnwguy2 View Post
Yes, I am surprised downstate Michigan isn't mentioned much on this thread. Definitely considered upper midwest. I am somewhat partial to the area, especially Western Michigan where my Dad grew up. Just some great folk there overall. Grand Rapids is a true gem in an otherwise somewhat down-trodden State over the decades. But I have hope for what appears to be a Detroit renaissance.
Grand Rapids is Michigan’s nicest big city. West Michigan in general is like northern Michigan in the fact that it is pretty. All the negative stereotypes of Michigan come from southeastern Michigan. Really sad that about 1/4 of that state has caused such harm to the entire states reputation. Many people however will instantly think of Detroit or Flint if mention the word Michigan.
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Old 10-17-2019, 09:19 AM
 
228 posts, read 94,704 times
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I can't stand humid heat and found Northern Michigan and Northern Minnesota summer weather to be very tolerable. Air isn't dry as in the West but it doesn't get muggy or uncomfortable, really. It's all about the dew point, not just absolute humidity of the air; there's "weatherspark" website that gives mugginess/humidity comfort graphs for each location - which gives an idea of how humidity feels locally. Northern Midwest mosquitoes is another story though, you got to experience them before you decide.
As to humid heat - Chicago latitudes in the Midwest should be intolerable to those who can't handle humid heat, I found even Central Wisconsin to be intolerably humid hot (I had lived in the West for the last 15 years).
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Old 10-17-2019, 09:23 AM
 
1,541 posts, read 1,170,244 times
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Hands down the Twin Cities (I say this as a former long time resident). It's progressive, extremely outdoorsy, with some of the best parks and bike paths in the country. The cost of living isn't cheap, but are justified by the salaries. The overall taxes are high.

It is a very liberal city (take that how you want, just a heads up), and the winters are extreme. But it's by far the most cosmopolitan city in the upper midwest. As others have noted, it's not devoid of humidity in the summer (winter is a different story, very dry).

My brother lives in Sioux Falls, SD, which is a thriving, bustling small city. He enjoys a low cost of living with no state income tax. It is very flat and windy there, and somewhat isolated. To an extent, you have to be okay with a 260K metro population being enough for you 95% of the time. The flat landscape lends itself to drifting snow that can often shut down the interstates flowing into and out of the city in the winter time.

I've also lived in WI. The northern part of the state is akin to Northern MN, that is lots of nice lakes and tall pines. Madison is thriving, but a lot smaller than the Twin Cities, which is why I have to give the nod to the Twin Cities.
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