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Old 10-16-2019, 02:22 PM
 
10,167 posts, read 13,889,909 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by NotEnufMinerals View Post
Lol, actually I'm in NYC now.

Well, the suburbs actually...about 1hr15 from the city.

Majored in Econ & History.
Then you should stay. NYC has so many jobs … very competitive here but any type of job you want, we have it. It will not be easy to get but it's not impossible.


Companies in other states often want to hire NYers b/c it's very cutthroat here. I suggest staying at your parents house , saving a TON of money by not renting, build your resume up & then in a couple of years make your move.
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Old 10-16-2019, 02:30 PM
 
Location: New Jersey
1,095 posts, read 487,682 times
Reputation: 498
Quote:
Originally Posted by NotEnufMinerals View Post
Hey, that's awesome to hear. I was hoping this could be helpful to someone else besides me I was sure I'm not the only one in this boat...

I have friends in the NYC metro area, and the general consensus there is that the job market is extremely competitive. Companies there are unwilling to just "take a chance" on you, and that hiring/recruiting there follows a kind of formal well-defined process that requires you to have already checked off a lot of their prerequisites before they even look at you (liking having gone to one of their target schools, for ex.)

Luckily for you, seems like you have more time than I do, so definitely do your best to lock something down before you graduate. I know my parents don't mind having me live at home, but it definitely cuts into their ability to go live their best lives now that they're empty-nesters.
I am more desperate than you, because I never liked my parents (and my state) and desperate to get tf out of here. There are no jobs in the NY metro area except NYC itself and most New Jerseyans tell me that it is not worth a commute to NYC from the good NJ suburbs, so stay tf out of the entire NY metro area. If you like your parents to death, stay at home longer and don't even worry about a job.
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Old 10-16-2019, 04:33 PM
 
Location: Colorado Springs
3,258 posts, read 2,309,416 times
Reputation: 3836
Quote:
Originally Posted by potanta View Post
I am in a similar situation as you. I do not have my degree yet, because I am a senior now. I am an IT major and I live in New Jersey. My dream is to move out West and I am not open to the eastern half of the US at all. IT jobs in NJ are scarce and you have to have a prestigious resume to even get a real job of any kind out here. The whole NY Metro Area is like that. Booming cities are usually secondary cities and those are the Millennial trends. If you are into technology, so far, San Francisco has tons of technology opportunities although it is not a secondary city. I am also looking at the San Francisco Bay Area as a backup plan, since my grandparents live there.

Secondary cities in the West that are definitely booming would be Boise, Colorado Springs, or Phoenix. Salt Lake City would also be a secondary city, but those three mentioned are definitely booming cities.

In the East, I would say Charlotte in North Carolina is a booming city. Most New Jerseyans who could not get jobs ended up getting a job there.
Overlay housing and other COL factors before just bailing. Colo Spgs has exceeded national averages for COL the first time in decades and wages tend to be somewhat depressed because transplants are willing to work for less simply to be near the mountains.

At nearly 5 million, not sure I'd call Phoenix a secondary city.
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Old 10-16-2019, 04:55 PM
 
Location: New Jersey
1,095 posts, read 487,682 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TCHP View Post
Overlay housing and other COL factors before just bailing. Colo Spgs has exceeded national averages for COL the first time in decades and wages tend to be somewhat depressed because transplants are willing to work for less simply to be near the mountains.

At nearly 5 million, not sure I'd call Phoenix a secondary city.
Also, Colorado Springs is becoming congested anyway due to the over hyped desire of living there.
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Old 10-17-2019, 04:26 AM
 
58,648 posts, read 83,245,348 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by NotEnufMinerals View Post
That sounds pretty good...will they have jobs for people without a STEM background?
There are some, but given your educational background, I would say that companies like these would be some to look into: https://bankershealthcaregroup.com/h...s-autotag-6731
https://www.cnybj.com/bankers-health...-hq-expansion/

https://www.mtb.com/home-page

https://www.bnymellon.com/

https://www.nbtbank.com/personal

https://us.axa.com/about-axa/axa-careers/index.html

https://www.uticanational.com/

A good source if you want to stay within the state/region: Central New York Jobs

I also agree with the networking aspect.
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Old 10-17-2019, 11:08 AM
 
21 posts, read 5,457 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ckhthankgod View Post
There are some, but given your educational background, I would say that companies like these would be some to look into: https://bankershealthcaregroup.com/h...s-autotag-6731
https://www.cnybj.com/bankers-health...-hq-expansion/

https://www.mtb.com/home-page

https://www.bnymellon.com/

https://www.nbtbank.com/personal

https://us.axa.com/about-axa/axa-careers/index.html

https://www.uticanational.com/

A good source if you want to stay within the state/region: Central New York Jobs

I also agree with the networking aspect.
Thank you for all the links but...have you checked them yourself first?

Most are at the Middle Management to Director levels...

It looks like you just linked to a bunch of banks that you knew off the top of your head?
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Old 10-17-2019, 11:14 AM
 
21 posts, read 5,457 times
Reputation: 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jdawg8181 View Post
Then you should stay. NYC has so many jobs … very competitive here but any type of job you want, we have it. It will not be easy to get but it's not impossible.


Companies in other states often want to hire NYers b/c it's very cutthroat here. I suggest staying at your parents house , saving a TON of money by not renting, build your resume up & then in a couple of years make your move.
I can't even get my foot in the door here. It's been a year...

The days of walking into a company with a resume in hand and a good strong handshake are over. Now, security will escort you out unless you have an appointment.

I'm sorry (seems like I'm apologizing to everybody here just trying to do some good) but you don't seem to have a realistic perspective on the job market in NYC. That's not a dig at you personally. But your advice amounts to "it's extremely competitive/cutthroat here...so just stick it out."

No, I need to leave. My parents need to leave for warmer climates already for health purposes and I am literally the only reason they are still here. If I could get a job and buy their house from them, that would be ideal, but it won't work out fast enough.
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Old 10-17-2019, 11:19 AM
 
21 posts, read 5,457 times
Reputation: 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by potanta View Post
I am more desperate than you, because I never liked my parents (and my state) and desperate to get tf out of here. There are no jobs in the NY metro area except NYC itself and most New Jerseyans tell me that it is not worth a commute to NYC from the good NJ suburbs, so stay tf out of the entire NY metro area. If you like your parents to death, stay at home longer and don't even worry about a job.
Well, I'm not gonna get into a Who's More Desperate competition over the internet with someone. If you want the title, it's all yours.

I also agree that the NJ->NYC commute is not worth it at this point unless you make over a certain amount (not sure what that is exactly).

And your choices really suck: either you live somewhere like Hoboken for the easy commute in and pay the high rents, or you move more inland for lower rent but longer commute times, higher commuting costs, and will most likely need a car then.

I love my parents to death. That's exactly why I can't stay at home any longer.

Also, no matter what your relationship is with your parents, it's poor form to speak ill of them behind their backs. Trust me when I say it makes you look bad, not your parents.
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Old 10-17-2019, 01:22 PM
 
Location: New Jersey
1,095 posts, read 487,682 times
Reputation: 498
Quote:
Originally Posted by NotEnufMinerals View Post
I love my parents to death. That's exactly why I can't stay at home any longer.
Doesn't make sense! If you love them to death, then why are you saying you CAN'T stay at home longer?
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Old 10-17-2019, 02:18 PM
 
860 posts, read 1,100,983 times
Reputation: 1131
Quote:
Originally Posted by KathiOH1 View Post
NotEnufMinerals, the key is networking rather than sending applications. Also important is having a well-defined goal for your first career!

1. Who do you know in the professional world? They don't have to be in your industry. They just have to be your advocate and ears/eyes. Family friends, relatives, parents of your friends?
2. If someone asks you what you're good at or what you want to do ... do you have a good response? I go to great lengths to help people make the right connections but when I get an answer like "I just want a job. I'll do anything," I shake my head an move on. You either relate well to people or you don't. What kind of data/products/services would you be good at analyzing, for example? You can either sell ice cream to an Eskimo or you can't. You either love getting lost in the details of research or you don't. What makes you YOU?
3. Do you have an updated Linkedin Profile? Have you connected with more experienced people in your industry and asked for advice and help getting started?
4. What do you look like in a Google search? Search your name and location. Do you share interesting articles on LinkedIn, Facebook, or YouTube to connect your face with something professional or do you appear in embarrassing photos and questionable forums?
5. Are you keeping yourself informed about your industry by setting up Google Alerts, following trendsetters in an industry, etc.?
6. Have you called companies and told them you were willing to take any job for the chance to gain experience and move toward you desired career? I once offered to work 6 months or free in return for learning programming. The deal was that if after 6 months I had learned the skill acceptibly, they would hire me at an agreed salary. I got the job 6 months later as well as free training.
7. Have you joined any organizations to expose yourself to movers and shakers ... Local Data Meetup Groups, ToastMasters, United Way, HonorAir...
This.........

A lot of jobs are friend of a friend and word of mouth. They never actually get posted for public consumption.

Also, have you tried contract to hire - it's a great way to get work experience. A lot of companies don't direct hire anymore. They bring people in as needed and see if they will work out before investing in paying them a full time salaried position. Other people are long term contractors - like for some state jobs. A lot of states have a hiring freeze, so they outsource so they aren't technically hiring new people to do the work.

Does your skill set match what employers are looking for? You may have to go back to school to get an advanced degree or the certifications that employers are looking for. My husband had to spend a bunch of money and we took out a bunch of loans to get those initial tech certifications before he could qualify for the jobs he actually wanted to do.

I know a lot of people who have volunteered in the field that they wanted to be in while working in a different job to pay the bills.

Also, check out your alma mater's job bank/career center. A lot of older alumni love to help the younger folks get started. Again, it's who you know, not necessarily what's on your resume that will get you in the door.
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