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Old 10-15-2019, 08:22 PM
 
21 posts, read 5,457 times
Reputation: 15

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Where would you recommend someone relocate to if they don't have any particular standout talents or skills but are ready to work hard and build their careers?

I (and surely others here also) am ready and willing to move somewhere to get a job that doesn't require 5+ years of experience or any specialized knowledge or advanced degrees that all the entry level job ads seem to demand these days.

While I do have a college degree, at this point, I'm fed up with applying for those jobs knowing that they either won't look at my resume (I hardly have any experience after all, just a degree from an albeit really good school) or there's always someone out there who's far more qualified and willing to work for less.

So I'm really ready for anything at this point. Doesn't even have to require a college degree. I would like to go somewhere with a booming economy that is hungry for hard workers and maybe even willing to actually invest in giving us the training we need so we can do our best.

I know some people like to recommend coding/programming, and I do think that's a good idea. But it takes (realistically) at least 6 months up to several years to get good enough to be hireable. So while I'm not against coding on my free-time, I would really like to just hit the ground running with something that can offer a paycheck.

So please help with any all of your ideas, CD. I am really open to anything. Are there parts of the US that are struggling to find people? Or certain industries? Or maybe specific companies you might know or have heard of? Anything will help, thank you!
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Old 10-15-2019, 10:18 PM
 
4,800 posts, read 2,923,400 times
Reputation: 4320
Go to a cold weather city with a low unemployment rate. They'd love to have you. Minneapolis for example.

Expensive coastal cities also need rank-and-file workers, who aren't plentiful because they're priced out. But here's the trick: Outside of SF, these places are doable if you don't have a car, debt, housepets, or kids, and you might need a roommate for a while.
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Old 10-15-2019, 10:29 PM
 
Location: New Jersey
1,095 posts, read 487,647 times
Reputation: 498
Quote:
Originally Posted by NotEnufMinerals View Post
Where would you recommend someone relocate to if they don't have any particular standout talents or skills but are ready to work hard and build their careers?

I (and surely others here also) am ready and willing to move somewhere to get a job that doesn't require 5+ years of experience or any specialized knowledge or advanced degrees that all the entry level job ads seem to demand these days.

While I do have a college degree, at this point, I'm fed up with applying for those jobs knowing that they either won't look at my resume (I hardly have any experience after all, just a degree from an albeit really good school) or there's always someone out there who's far more qualified and willing to work for less.

So I'm really ready for anything at this point. Doesn't even have to require a college degree. I would like to go somewhere with a booming economy that is hungry for hard workers and maybe even willing to actually invest in giving us the training we need so we can do our best.

I know some people like to recommend coding/programming, and I do think that's a good idea. But it takes (realistically) at least 6 months up to several years to get good enough to be hireable. So while I'm not against coding on my free-time, I would really like to just hit the ground running with something that can offer a paycheck.

So please help with any all of your ideas, CD. I am really open to anything. Are there parts of the US that are struggling to find people? Or certain industries? Or maybe specific companies you might know or have heard of? Anything will help, thank you!
I am in a similar situation as you. I do not have my degree yet, because I am a senior now. I am an IT major and I live in New Jersey. My dream is to move out West and I am not open to the eastern half of the US at all. IT jobs in NJ are scarce and you have to have a prestigious resume to even get a real job of any kind out here. The whole NY Metro Area is like that. Booming cities are usually secondary cities and those are the Millennial trends. If you are into technology, so far, San Francisco has tons of technology opportunities although it is not a secondary city. I am also looking at the San Francisco Bay Area as a backup plan, since my grandparents live there.

Secondary cities in the West that are definitely booming would be Boise, Colorado Springs, or Phoenix. Salt Lake City would also be a secondary city, but those three mentioned are definitely booming cities.

In the East, I would say Charlotte in North Carolina is a booming city. Most New Jerseyans who could not get jobs ended up getting a job there.
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Old 10-15-2019, 11:01 PM
 
Location: Northern Virginia
1,162 posts, read 412,391 times
Reputation: 2759
Get in on the ground floor of a big corporation doing well. No matter the job, just get in. Work hard, be all they want you to be. Sound advice 40 years ago, sound advice today. I know folks who started answering phones and now manage entire office sites and business units. And that wasnt the 60s, they started in the 00s.

Even if you only plan to stick around for a handful of years, it will be good for experience in how big organizations function.
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Old 10-16-2019, 05:23 AM
 
21,580 posts, read 31,233,765 times
Reputation: 20342
Move to a big city with a very low unemployment rate. My suggestion would be Boston which at 2.6% unemployment is a full percent below the national average. When the rate dips below 3% employers in all but the most specialized fields typically have issues filling entry level positions with desirable candidates. Is Boston considered expensive? Yes, but as arguably the nation's biggest college town (Harvard, Boston College, Boston U, Northeastern U, Tufts and several others) finding shared and affordable living space is a breeze and often a great way to network for jobs via roommate/new friend acquaintances. Bear in mind as well that "expensive" cities have significantly higher salaries so conceivably in a shared living situation you could find yourself able to put aside some savings versus living paycheck to paycheck.
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Old 10-16-2019, 06:47 AM
 
58,635 posts, read 83,232,230 times
Reputation: 12892
Actually, a lot of “Rust Belt” cities are in this position of baby boomers retiring and needing people to take the jobs that they are leaving. This is occurring in Upstate NY. A couple of references to this: https://www.localsyr.com/news/newsma...nd-doug-wehbe/

https://www.google.com/amp/s/amp.dem...amp/2524671002
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Old 10-16-2019, 07:49 AM
 
1,519 posts, read 1,162,714 times
Reputation: 2178
I do agree that in general, northern cities with low unemployment are a good place to start:

Twin Cities
Fargo
Sioux Falls
Des Moines
Omaha

But let's take a step back. What is your degree in? Have you gotten objective feedback (I mean true, constructive criticism from someone who reads a lot of resumes) on your resume? I'm a bit leery hearing you say that you have a college degree but no one will look at you (in this economy!). Also, there are a lot of decent paying remote jobs on Indeed if you search for such.

Now if you want to move for new scenery, that's a different thing. But have you really tapped out all your options locally? What type of work do you enjoy?
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Old 10-16-2019, 08:19 AM
 
15,085 posts, read 8,102,228 times
Reputation: 27321
When you're 65, there's an enormous advantage to having lived in a high cost of living region of the country. Your pay was much higher so you likely have a much bigger Social Security check. You probably saved more in your 401(k). You're sitting in a big pile of home equity. When you stop working, you can always move to a lower cost of living place.
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Old 10-16-2019, 08:41 AM
 
4,800 posts, read 2,923,400 times
Reputation: 4320
That's often true GeoffD. You can also stay in town, and move to a smaller place with similar effect.
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Old 10-16-2019, 08:59 AM
 
Location: Tennessee
25,128 posts, read 18,637,686 times
Reputation: 29622
Quote:
Originally Posted by mhays25 View Post
Go to a cold weather city with a low unemployment rate. They'd love to have you. Minneapolis for example.

Expensive coastal cities also need rank-and-file workers, who aren't plentiful because they're priced out. But here's the trick: Outside of SF, these places are doable if you don't have a car, debt, housepets, or kids, and you might need a roommate for a while.
For professional jobs, this was my math.

Back in 2012, I was making a very low income in a rural part of Virginia. There's no job base there. I started looking at places with low unemployment rates, openings in my field, and a reasonable cost of living. The COL in a superstar city would have eaten me alive. I ended up in Des Moines. It met the need at the time.
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