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Old 10-21-2019, 12:12 PM
 
1,128 posts, read 422,667 times
Reputation: 1196

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Frustratedintelligence View Post
Unless you can explain objectively why barbecue has to be pork based, then your statement is nothing more than hyperbole.
Samuel Johnson’s The Dictionary of the English Language:

barbecue- a hog dressed whole


The word comes from an Indian cooking style, but as practiced in the English colonies and under the name “barbecue”, it specifically was in reference to the finished product involving a pig (or the gathering that came about when eating said product). The years and Texan hubris have muddled the issue as people use barbecue as a verb and use it as a synonym for smoking meat. Even worse is confusing a barbecue with grilling out, but now we are just getting into the weeds.
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Old 10-21-2019, 01:43 PM
 
Location: Miami-Dade
536 posts, read 189,339 times
Reputation: 919
Quote:
Originally Posted by Heel82 View Post
Samuel Johnson’s The Dictionary of the English Language:

barbecue- a hog dressed whole


The word comes from an Indian cooking style, but as practiced in the English colonies and under the name “barbecue”, it specifically was in reference to the finished product involving a pig (or the gathering that came about when eating said product). The years and Texan hubris have muddled the issue as people use barbecue as a verb and use it as a synonym for smoking meat. Even worse is confusing a barbecue with grilling out, but now we are just getting into the weeds.
See, even you admit that "barbecue" is nothing but an Anglicized version of a term that never originally involved pork to begin with. Different words have been used throughout time to describe a style of cooking that has always used various meats. It just so happens that Johnson's definition came about in a time where pork was the most popular meat choice.

Texas barbecue is world famous these days, and people obviously appreciate the focus on beef. I think to make a fuss over how the word is used is petty, and it definitely undermines the passion and skill that goes into the product; no less than you'll find in the Carolinas.

The concept has always been the same, whether it involved a cow, a pig or a turkey.
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Old 10-21-2019, 01:55 PM
 
Location: Monument,CO
365 posts, read 305,968 times
Reputation: 555
Colorado is unremarkable in every way. 21 seems generous. I stopped reading at:
"Pennsylvania Dutch culture contains the only truly regional food in the U.S. because there’s nothing like it anywhere else."

Umm, Louisiana?
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Old 10-21-2019, 02:18 PM
 
1,128 posts, read 422,667 times
Reputation: 1196
Quote:
Originally Posted by Frustratedintelligence View Post
See, even you admit that "barbecue" is nothing but an Anglicized version of a term that never originally involved pork to begin with.
I didn’t quite say that, as root words are not definitions (watch a minute of the Scripps National Spelling Bee to drive home this point). But I fear we are spiraling. I made light of a clickbait list. Feel free to enjoy your smoked beef brisket or crocodile leg or whatever and calling it barbecue. I’ll feel free to bless your sweet heart.
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Old 10-21-2019, 02:21 PM
Status: "Bostonian in Baltimore" (set 17 days ago)
 
Location: Baltimore
3,143 posts, read 1,678,020 times
Reputation: 2739
Quote:
Originally Posted by unbeliever View Post
Colorado is unremarkable in every way. 21 seems generous. I stopped reading at:
"Pennsylvania Dutch culture contains the only truly regional food in the U.S. because there’s nothing like it anywhere else."

Umm, Louisiana?
Mountain Pie is pretty nice and I liked the Mexican trucks in off the beaten path areas. Also good variety of fast casual spots in Denver.
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Old 10-21-2019, 02:37 PM
 
Location: Northern Virginia
1,165 posts, read 413,988 times
Reputation: 2772
Random clickbait by silly millennials.
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Old 10-21-2019, 02:51 PM
 
360 posts, read 565,839 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dc1538 View Post
Most of the top 5 where as expected. They all have high populations and diversity.

I rolled my eyes, when they said Nashville put Tennessee on the culinary map. Ever since I can remember Memphis barbecue has been well known and considered some of the best in the country depending on who you ask. Nashville's cuisine, hot chicken as far a popularity, is a recent origin.

I did learn that the origins my family putting sugar on rice likely came from Arkansas, which I think one side is originally from. I get mixed reactions when I tell people I put sugar on my rice even though Arkansas is right across the river.
I'm from Arkansas and I did grow up thinking that putting sugar on it was the only way to eat rice, but I thought it was a general southern thing, not just Arkansas.
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Old 10-21-2019, 03:44 PM
 
409 posts, read 328,049 times
Reputation: 557
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jdawg8181 View Post
Anyone have this is in a list form? The slides are crashing my computer
Open the link on your phone. It's in a single page format.
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Old 10-21-2019, 03:59 PM
 
409 posts, read 328,049 times
Reputation: 557
Quote:
Originally Posted by kdb05f View Post
I'm from Arkansas and I did grow up thinking that putting sugar on it was the only way to eat rice, but I thought it was a general southern thing, not just Arkansas.
I'm in Memphis, so you get a mixture of people of people from Arkansas, Mississippi, and Tennessee with recent or distant origins. Some things that I thought were general southern ways of eating are not and may be more region specific. A few that I've ran into:

Rice - sugar/no sugar
Beans- sugar/no sugar/ketchup/no ketchup
Catfish - hot sauce/ ketchup (black/white)

I'm sure there are other foods I'm leaving out.
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Old 10-21-2019, 04:26 PM
 
10,167 posts, read 13,895,768 times
Reputation: 6358
Quote:
Originally Posted by dc1538 View Post
Open the link on your phone. It's in a single page format.
Thanks, better. The ads are annoying.


NY # 2!! Woohoo. Though I think it should be #1. There isn't anything you can get in NY …


Mexican food is way better in CA BUT on the whole, I think NY has much more varieties … and I not even referring to NYC … but places like Rochester that are known for garbage plates
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