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Old 10-21-2019, 11:58 PM
 
6,143 posts, read 6,546,586 times
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I'm not surprised that South Dakota is near the bottom, but I feel like Indian tacos and kuchen should be worth a slightly higher rating.
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Old 10-22-2019, 01:28 AM
 
5,967 posts, read 2,602,694 times
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Lazy clickbait article. And my state did pretty well, comparatively speaking.
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Old 10-22-2019, 06:07 AM
 
12,389 posts, read 5,532,844 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GeoffD View Post
I’m good with California, New York, and Louisiana. New Mexico should be much higher. Santa Fe is a real foodie place. DC is a top city for dining that isn’t California or NYC. Illinois is #5 because of Chicago. Metro DC is at the same level but Virginia is way down the charts.

The list is really biased towards BBQ. If it didn’t have that bias, the rankings would be very different.
I think they certainly got the top 3 correct and those have virtually nothing to do with BBQ. Washington DC, it not Virginia. Virginia is a large enough state on it's own and most of it is not part of the DC metro.
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Old 10-22-2019, 10:30 AM
 
Location: Texas
1,855 posts, read 1,336,332 times
Reputation: 1860
Quote:
Originally Posted by Foamposite View Post
That's not entirely true because Texas does beef BBQ and part of Kentucky does mutton BBQ
I never knew that about Kentucky, thanks for the info. I guess even in the Southeast there are detractors. (That may not be the correct word, people feel free to correct me). To be fair, at least, Texas isn't part of the Southeast.
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Old 10-22-2019, 11:48 AM
 
Location: New York, NY
1,249 posts, read 718,714 times
Reputation: 1873
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tom Lennox 70 View Post
I do think this list is highly elitist and geared toward yuppie tastes.

There's two ways to judge a state's cuisine. In terms of native cuisine, Louisiana is clearly #1, with Texas and Georgia in second and third. However if you factor in the availability of international cuisines then California can be ranked pretty high. California has basically no native cuisine worth mentioning, but they have authentic Mexican and Chinese food plus Japanese, Korean, etc. Louisiana has the best native cuisine but there is less international offerings here.

So overall it would have to be Texas since it has barbecue, steaks, burgers, seafood (on the coast) country cooking, Tex-Mex, authentic Mexican food AND Asian food.

I also don't get the bias against chain restaurants and fast food, some of which are good. Popeyes and Raising Cane's are local institutions here in Louisiana. Texas Roadhouse is one of my favorite restaurants, and Waffle House is immensely popular throughout the South. In fact if someone visits the South from a place that doesn't have Waffle House or Cracker Barrel, they should probably stop at one.
It's biased against chain restaurants because most chain restaurants are garbage. People eat at chain restaurants when there's no other choice or they don't know any better. If you live in a place with diverse culinary offerings, you almost never go to chain restaurants. They are, for the most part, crap compared to their independent competitors. Olive Garden isn't Italian food, sorry.

...Cheesecake Factory being the exception...
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Old 10-22-2019, 12:08 PM
 
Location: Somerville, MA
8,293 posts, read 16,425,431 times
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Kind of ridiculous on a few of these.

Florida jumps out as being unfairly/awfully ranked. There's good food all over Florida. And any state that has access to fresh seafood and has a diverse population with a heavy Latin American influence will have plenty of good options. Florida is a place I would never live, but it would be disingenuous to say that it's not a good place for food.

Rhode Island is a great food state. Providence is one of the best foodie small cities in the country, and great food is found all over places like Newport, Bristol, Warren, etc. Seafood is an obvious strength of the Ocean State, but it's also famous for generations of Italian and Portuguese heritage and the cuisine that comes with it. Apart from maybe parts of CT, RI has the best Latin American cuisine in New England as well. Oh, and fried calamari is far more of a Rhode Island staple than the chow mein sandwich which is certainly a Fall River (Massachusetts) invention.

I also have a hard time with CT being above MA or RI. And Maine is a mixed bag. Portland's a good food town and ME does seafood well, but it's a void of any type of quality land-based meats or international influence on the culinary front (or in general, really), so it's not exactly a place that's rife with many great options.
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Old 10-22-2019, 01:17 PM
 
1,124 posts, read 421,655 times
Reputation: 1191
Quote:
Originally Posted by Soonhun View Post
I never knew that about Kentucky, thanks for the info. I guess even in the Southeast there are detractors. (That may not be the correct word, people feel free to correct me). To be fair, at least, Texas isn't part of the Southeast.
Is now the time that I say I don’t consider Kentucky “Southeast”? [ducks]
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Old 10-22-2019, 01:37 PM
 
Location: Miami-Dade
534 posts, read 189,329 times
Reputation: 919
Quote:
Originally Posted by Heel82 View Post
I said the word “barbecue” came from an Indian cooking style, “barabicu” where they slow cooked pigs and fish over a fire. You took that to mean I was accepting barbecue could be meats other than pork. Except all I was referencing was the root of the term barbecue, not defining it. I let Samuel Johnson define it for me.
What you acknowledged is that barabicu/barbacoa/barbecue are the same concept used by different cultures of people at different points at time. I think to pretend otherwise is simply disingenuous.

So here's my question: what term do you think Texans should use to describe other smoked meat? Barabicu is the only term you will allow to include meats other than pork, but don't you think that would only confuse people? Doesn't it just make more sense to call it all barbecue? Barbacoa is an actual thing in Texas (by way of Mexico), except that it usually refers specifically to goat/cow head which often times isn't even smoked.
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Old 10-22-2019, 01:38 PM
 
Location: Appalachian New York, Formerly Louisiana
4,345 posts, read 4,929,621 times
Reputation: 5801
uuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuugh I can't stand these kinds of websites that spread the list out over several pages to get more ads looked at.
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Old 10-22-2019, 02:05 PM
 
1,124 posts, read 421,655 times
Reputation: 1191
Quote:
Originally Posted by Frustratedintelligence View Post
What you acknowledged is that barabicu/barbacoa/barbecue are the same concept used by different cultures of people at different points at time. I think to pretend otherwise is simply disingenuous.

So here's my question: what term do you think Texans should use to describe other smoked meat? Barabicu is the only term you will allow to include meats other than pork, but don't you think that would only confuse people? Doesn't it just make more sense to call it all barbecue? Barbacoa is an actual thing in Texas (by way of Mexico), except that it usually refers specifically to goat/cow head which often times isn't even smoked.
Well “barbecue” was first used by a specific culture and had a specific meaning. While there is some connection to the Indian concept, there were differences that went beyond spelling. I think people should call their food what it is. I love brisket. But I also call it brisket. I might have brisket with my barbecue, but I’d never say I’m having two servings of barbecue if I did that. Americans are too laissez-faire about these things. If this was France, we’d have declared Southern barbecue a protected national heritage item and made Kansas City and Texas call theirs sparkling wine or meat or whatever.
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