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Old 10-23-2019, 06:01 PM
 
710 posts, read 563,439 times
Reputation: 761

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adding onto that the city of Boston is chock full of projects in yuppie neighborhoods.

https://goo.gl/maps/JiM9i3PRti6pre4A6 spitting distance from

https://goo.gl/maps/Tme4VXxjAvFXoggx8



https://goo.gl/maps/zs1v2qfiRQ3ugxcL7
vs

https://goo.gl/maps/Hse98U8HfcsAgTi37



https://goo.gl/maps/DLph2C23GvEBeBPn7

vs

https://goo.gl/maps/f4NY28rEG6PsEadW6
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Old 10-23-2019, 08:37 PM
 
9,289 posts, read 8,109,590 times
Reputation: 5742
Quote:
Originally Posted by GeoffD View Post
Southern New England has a bunch of them. I used to live in Andover so I'm very familiar with that one.


Brockton MA / Easton


Barrington RI / East Providence


Longmeadow MA / Springfield


Hartford CT / West Hartford


I'm in middle/upper middle class suburbia a mile and a half from the city line and first housing project. When each city & town runs their own public school systems and zoning pretty much kills high density housing in the suburbs, you get those abrupt transitions.
Quote:
Originally Posted by lrfox View Post
Some of those transitions aren't that abrupt though. A few examples above are talking a transition within a quarter of a mile, or even a block or two. I can't think of too many places in New England where the change happens that fast. Mattapan Square to Miltion may be the closest. You can see the impact of different zoning laws on the Fall River/Freetown Line pretty easily too - This is the first thing you see in Fall River, and this is Freetown, just a few feet away. The Fall River setup is not exactly "hood," but it's not high end/single family either.

If we're talking purely urban to suburban, Euston St. in Boston is one of my favorite. This is the best spot, right on the Boston/Brookline line looking towards Boston. Rotate 180 degrees, and it's a completely different world. Zoning is an interesting animal.
Barrington to East Providence (you even been there?) is not exactly drastic either, neither is Brockton (West Side) to (South) Easton. Brockton (N Main) crossing into Avon is actually a greater contrast.


Outside the Milton to Mattapan contrast, another New England example would be Boylston to Worcester. You drive down Rte. 70 through the leafy suburbia of Boylston, the second you cross the Worcester city line you are right at Great Brook Valley (the worst projects in the city), followed shortly after by Lincoln Village (a massive low income development).


Brookline to Boston's Mission Hill section also used to be a HUGE day and night difference, not so much anymore as Mission Hill has dramatically gentrified.
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Old 10-24-2019, 09:28 AM
 
Location: Somerville, MA
8,293 posts, read 16,425,431 times
Reputation: 9708
Quote:
Originally Posted by massnative71 View Post
Outside the Milton to Mattapan contrast, another New England example would be Boylston to Worcester. You drive down Rte. 70 through the leafy suburbia of Boylston, the second you cross the Worcester city line you are right at Great Brook Valley (the worst projects in the city), followed shortly after by Lincoln Village (a massive low income development).
I didn't think of this one, but it's a good example. The whole environment changes right at the line (But isn't that actually Shrewsbury to Worcester, not Boylston there)?
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Old 10-24-2019, 10:08 AM
 
Location: The City of Brotherly Love
1,100 posts, read 770,481 times
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Philadelphia's Germantown Avenue is an interesting one.

It starts off like this in Northern Liberties:

https://www.google.com/maps/@39.9665...7i16384!8i8192

Goes to this while passing through the heart of North Philly:

https://www.google.com/maps/@39.9972...7i16384!8i8192

Transforms into this while passing through Northwest Philly:

https://www.google.com/maps/@40.0764...7i16384!8i8192

And looks like this outside of city limits:
https://www.google.com/maps/@40.0864...7i16384!8i8192


The most dramatic hood-to-burb change in the Philadelphia area, however, is in Chester. Here's Edgmont Avenue in the heart of Chester:

https://www.google.com/maps/@39.8484...7i13312!8i6656

And this is what adjoining Parkside looks like:

https://www.google.com/maps/@39.8677...7i13312!8i6656
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Old 10-24-2019, 01:29 PM
Status: "Bostonian in Baltimore" (set 15 days ago)
 
Location: Baltimore
3,124 posts, read 1,675,126 times
Reputation: 2724
Quote:
Originally Posted by Space_League View Post
Lawrence to Andover / north Andover is pretty abrupt but it depends on which way you travel. I think the most is if you get off the highway on exit 44 you can basically take a left or a right. If you take a right you're here

https://goo.gl/maps/3pHZ2ayZWQ1ueUme6


and if you take a left you're here


https://goo.gl/maps/M9ZgETzUib2arjY58

Naturally the pan handlers are always the left side of the road. However the mill buildings you see in pic 1 have been renovated and turned into lofts since then and the change is considerably less jarring as a result of that.


I think that from a visual perspective the milton / mattapan transition is the most abrupt even compared to the South End. You pretty much have five long blocks from Tremont to Melnea cass where the transition takes place. It's extremely common to see homeless / addicts on any of these blocks sleeping on stoops or milling about in general despite the high rents in the neighborhood.

There is also a decent amount of violent crime from the projects on Camden and Shawmut (at least during the time I lived in that area some years ago) which effects everything SE of Tremont.
this is a pretty good one. Although not as good as that Chester one most recently posted
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Old 10-24-2019, 01:45 PM
 
Location: East Mt Airy, Philadelphia
1,075 posts, read 1,088,073 times
Reputation: 2012
Quote:
Originally Posted by cpomp View Post
Its not quite a 1 block area, but if you drive West out of Philadelphia along Lancaster Ave (Route 30), you go from some of the city's roughest sections to some of the nations wealthiest suburbs in probably a 3 mile stretch.

You literally see the change when you cross over the border from Philadelphia County into Montgomery County.
Yes, that stretch kind of smacks you in the head. Another local route of interest, and again, not a block-to-block transition, is Germantown Avenue. This runs from Chestnut Hill, one of the city's toniest 'hoods almost to Center City (our "downtown"). Start at https://www.google.com/maps/@40.0774...=en&authuser=0 and "drive" down the Avenue toward downtown. Fascinating transition from high income to upper/middle, to The Hood, then an upward blip in prosperity toward the end.
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Old 10-26-2019, 08:58 PM
 
9,289 posts, read 8,109,590 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by lrfox View Post
I didn't think of this one, but it's a good example. The whole environment changes right at the line (But isn't that actually Shrewsbury to Worcester, not Boylston there)?
You're right, you cross though a small sliver of Shrewsbury headed into Worcester.
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Old 10-28-2019, 08:34 AM
 
Location: That star on your map in the middle of the East Coast, DMV
4,261 posts, read 3,665,295 times
Reputation: 2756
Quote:
Originally Posted by TheTimidBlueBars View Post
Crossing the bridge over the Potomac River from Oxon Hill/Forest Heights into Alexandria.

Crossing the Anacostia is a more obvious example, but the stuff on the northwest side is more gentrified-urban than quiet-suburban.
Forest Heights and Oxon Hill don't really have hood/run down housing stock at all. For what we consider our local "PG hoods" it's actually pretty middle class.

Forest Heights:

https://www.google.com/maps/@38.8115...7i13312!8i6656

Oxon Hill:

https://www.google.com/maps/@38.7943...7i13312!8i6656
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Old 10-28-2019, 10:06 AM
Status: "Bostonian in Baltimore" (set 15 days ago)
 
Location: Baltimore
3,124 posts, read 1,675,126 times
Reputation: 2724
Quote:
Originally Posted by the resident09 View Post
Forest Heights and Oxon Hill don't really have hood/run down housing stock at all. For what we consider our local "PG hoods" it's actually pretty middle class.

Forest Heights:

https://www.google.com/maps/@38.8115...7i13312!8i6656

Oxon Hill:

https://www.google.com/maps/@38.7943...7i13312!8i6656
that part of Indian Head Highway juuuts south of DC is very hood though.

https://www.google.com/maps/@38.8203...7i16384!8i8192

but yes PG hoods are really wayyyy over blown in the DMV.
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Old 10-28-2019, 02:01 PM
 
Location: That star on your map in the middle of the East Coast, DMV
4,261 posts, read 3,665,295 times
Reputation: 2756
Quote:
Originally Posted by BostonBornMassMade View Post
that part of Indian Head Highway juuuts south of DC is very hood though.

https://www.google.com/maps/@38.8203...7i16384!8i8192

but yes PG hoods are really wayyyy over blown in the DMV.
Oh yea that's Eastover. Not pretty at all, but if you ask someone from certain parts of SE they will say that that's not too bad.
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