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Old 10-22-2019, 11:20 AM
 
Location: North Carolina
469 posts, read 150,779 times
Reputation: 419

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Quote:
Originally Posted by ckhthankgod View Post
Yes, I don't think people consider the land size of cities they compare. For cities in Upstate NY, most of the relatively decent to larger sized cities are only 10-40 square miles, if not smaller in regards to the Poughkeepsie(5 sq. mi.)-Newburgh(3.8 sq. mi.)-Middletown(5 sq. mi.) area, but there are 5 metro areas that are in the top 90-100 in the country in population from that part of the state. So, I don't know if people realize how a lot of city proper comparisons between different regions aren't necessarily tit for tat in terms of land size.

For instance, Syracuse is only 25 square miles, which is similar to Greenville SC, but has 2 and a half times as many people within its city limits. This goes for other Northeastern cities as well. So, this is something to consider when viewing different cities.

However, having a smaller, but more compact built environment might be good in terms of walkability potential for these cities as well.
It seems older and denser cites tend be to be smaller. Had NYC never annexed the other 4 Boros it would be much smaller and more crowded. Cites in the South, West, and Midwest (to some extent) have much lesser annexation laws so that's why cites like Los Angeles, Houston, and Phoenix have so much sprawl and large landmasses.
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Old 10-22-2019, 11:34 AM
 
58,649 posts, read 83,245,348 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mwalker96 View Post
It seems older and denser cites tend be to be smaller. Had NYC never annexed the other 4 Boros it would be much smaller and more crowded. Cites in the South, West, and Midwest (to some extent) have much lesser annexation laws so that's why cites like Los Angeles, Houston, and Phoenix have so much sprawl and large landmasses.
This and for many cities, much of their development came after Urban Renewal. In turn, its impact wasn't felt as hard in "newer" cities like it did with "older" cities.
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Old 10-22-2019, 11:44 AM
 
1,104 posts, read 1,622,315 times
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Bridgeport, CT

19.4 sq miles

939k in the metro
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Old 10-22-2019, 12:21 PM
 
13,878 posts, read 22,479,234 times
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Atlanta.
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Old 10-22-2019, 01:34 PM
 
Location: Newark, CA
2,219 posts, read 4,860,546 times
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San Francisco only covers 49 square miles. The other big cities that anchor the SF Bay Area are Oakland and San Jose which each cover more land more area than SF. San Jose also has over 100k more people than SF does. The city/county of SF itself only covers a tiny portion of the Bay Area and only contains a fraction of the residents. The population of SF is under 900k and the entire Bay Area covers nine counties and has close to 8 million residents.
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Old 10-22-2019, 05:48 PM
 
Location: Minneapolis
95 posts, read 16,491 times
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Minneapolis is 56 square miles. It has 425,000 people, the Twin Cities msa is around 3.6 million.
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Old 10-22-2019, 06:45 PM
 
Location: WA Desert, Seattle native
6,171 posts, read 4,101,201 times
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Alaska is home to some of the largest cities (or towns) by square miles. The largest in the lower 48 appears to be Jacksonville, FL. Scroll down this chart for the smallest...it only goes #150. Note some cities include a lot of their water areas in their boundaries.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_o...cities_by_area

This chart goes a bit further:

https://www.indexmundi.com/facts/uni...rank/land-area

Miami may be the smallest city by land area in a large metro area.

Last edited by pnwguy2; 10-22-2019 at 06:54 PM..
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Old 10-22-2019, 07:03 PM
 
5,746 posts, read 6,282,833 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Somnifor View Post
Minneapolis is 56 square miles. It has 425,000 people, the Twin Cities msa is around 3.6 million.
Minneapolis is a gem of a city and is definitely a model city for my hometown of St. Louis imo.
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Old 10-22-2019, 10:09 PM
 
Location: The Heart of Dixie
8,248 posts, read 12,625,043 times
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Atlanta has a small population, not even 500,000 for a metro area of its size. I think Las Vegas also has small city limits, even the Strip is outside city limits. Miami has small city limits though Miami-Dade County is consolidated.

New Orleans has relatively small city limits, and due to the geography is Lake Pontchartrain some of the main suburbs like Slidell and Covington are physically very far from downtown though the inner suburbs like Metairie, Kenner, Westwego and Harvey are very dense.
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Old 10-23-2019, 02:07 AM
 
Location: North Carolina
469 posts, read 150,779 times
Reputation: 419
Interesting responses. It seems the smallest cities by landarea tend to be older and denser while sprawling newer cities tend to be vast. Most of the biggest cites by square miles tend to be more car-friendly while the smaller cities are more pedestrian friendly. Most Southern and Western cites devolped during the automobile era but you do have cites like New Orleans which is one of the oldest cities in the US that has a pedestrian feel and Los Angeles was already becoming a major city by the 1920s even though it's classified as a modern sun-belt city it was developing well before WW2 hence why many say today it's overcrowded and gets the NYC treatment as far as cites to leave vs move to and start a family.
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