U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > General U.S.
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
View Poll Results: What Sought After Big Brand Chains Indicate a City/Metro has "Arrived?"
Patagonia Store 8 9.64%
Crate and Barrel 12 14.46%
Pottery Barn 5 6.02%
West Elm 6 7.23%
Nordstrom 22 26.51%
IKEA 29 34.94%
Google Store 7 8.43%
Amazon Retail Store 15 18.07%
Apple Store 25 30.12%
Samsung Store 5 6.02%
Dave n Buster's 5 6.02%
Top Golf 12 14.46%
Cheesecake Factory 10 12.05%
Maggiano's 2 2.41%
Palm Steakhouse 6 7.23%
Four Season's Hotel 27 32.53%
Ritz Carlton 31 37.35%
Westin Hotel 6 7.23%
Hard Rock Cafe 7 8.43%
Margaritaville Hotel 3 3.61%
Other (list it) 11 13.25%
Multiple Choice Poll. Voters: 83. You may not vote on this poll

Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 10-25-2019, 09:31 AM
 
971 posts, read 488,196 times
Reputation: 1189

Advertisements

Ikea.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 10-25-2019, 09:41 AM
 
7,976 posts, read 4,838,053 times
Reputation: 8721
Soulcycle
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-25-2019, 09:42 AM
 
Location: Kansas City North
178 posts, read 81,568 times
Reputation: 278
Ikea
Costco
Trader Joe's
Whole Foods
Cheesecake Factory
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-25-2019, 12:14 PM
 
Location: Point Loma, San Diego, CA
1,535 posts, read 1,217,869 times
Reputation: 1321
It has to be Apple Store then Ikea, so I think the poll is pretty accurate.

Amazon Retail is too experimental right now. We got the 2nd Amazon Books after Seattle here in SD and I believe we were one of the first markets after Seattle to get the Treasure Truck. Didn't think much of it because I knew Amazon liked to do stuff in San Diego.


Getting an Apple store is the most symbolic of being a destination metro, from the poll choices. Ikea has to be close.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-25-2019, 12:36 PM
 
Location: East Tennessee and Atlanta
4,212 posts, read 9,044,498 times
Reputation: 2997
Quote:
Originally Posted by gladhands View Post
Soulcycle
Ahh, now that's a GOOD one. A newer company (within 8-10 yrs?), but a GOOD one.

Soulcycle locating in your area Indicates demographics with big disposable income to spend, and they are rapidly expanding.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-25-2019, 12:40 PM
 
Location: Miami, The Magic City
3,109 posts, read 2,179,841 times
Reputation: 2171
Then should we add Equinox, which owns 97% of Soulcycle?

Quote:
Originally Posted by jjbradleynyc View Post
Ahh, now that's a GOOD one. A newer company (within 8-10 yrs?), but a GOOD one.

Soulcycle locating in your area Indicates demographics with big disposable income to spend, and they are rapidly expanding.

Last edited by elchevere; 10-25-2019 at 01:28 PM..
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-25-2019, 02:08 PM
 
Location: New York, NY
1,250 posts, read 718,148 times
Reputation: 1873
Quote:
Originally Posted by gladhands View Post
Soulcycle
This is a good one. You could add Barry's, FlyWheel, OrangeTheory, CrossFit, or any any boutique where you shell out $30+ a pop.

Quote:
Originally Posted by ckhthankgod View Post
Ooooh, I didn't know their footprint was so limited.

Although I think the brand's affordable prices wouldn't necessarily be a marker of a place having "made it". When I think of that term, I generally think of a risk-adverse, high-end brand that would only come in once the area truly had money.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-25-2019, 02:21 PM
 
Location: Terramaria
821 posts, read 891,453 times
Reputation: 950
Quote:
Originally Posted by VietInKC View Post
Ikea
Costco
Trader Joe's
Whole Foods
Cheesecake Factory
That's basically a sign your city is merely regionally important but not quite national or globally important.

To me, it really comes down to categories, ranging from rural hamlets, to micropolitan towns, then small metros, then medium-size metros, then large metros, and then finally mega-cities. As a result, the bigger cities have more of a middle, then upper middle, and finally, upper class to allow new chains to be found. Here's how I preak it down:

To a rural farm dweller who lives in a tiny town with a traffic light, a McDonald's means that you've arrived, along with any budget motel like a Motel 6 or an Econo Lodge, mostly off the highway exit.

To a small towner deep in flyover country, Walmart or a Chevy dealer means that you've arrived, along with a more respectable hotel/motel like a Comfort Inn, Holiday Inn, or Days Inn.

To someone from a micropolitan "big small town" where country music and NASCAR is still the norm, a JCPenney, Dillards, Belk, or a Buick dealership is a coming of age signal, along with midmarket hotel brands like Courtyard, Best Western, Homewood Suites, or Doubletree.

To a small metro area that's a subregional center, one of the following chains listed by the above or a "regular luxury" dealership like Cadillac, Lincoln, Lexus, or Mercedes is that coming of age signal and standard around this point, along with hotel brands like Sheraton, Marriott, Hyatt, or Hilton. Better stores like Macy's, H&M, Men's Wearhouse, and DSW appear.

To a medium-sized metro that dominates the region and may even include a major league team or at the least the highest minor league level team, one of the following above along with either a Nordstrom, Lord & Taylor, or Neiman Marcus. There may be that four-star hotel brand like a Renaissance, Embassy Suites, or the Regency division of Hyatt. Multiple luxury car dealerships are present, but lack the elite brands as described above. By now, the Apple store is a standard feature.

To a large metro that's a superregional center and usually nationally important as well as being a lesser global city, having everything in the last category, PLUS those five-star hotel brands like the Ritz and Four Seasons (or any thing subtitled "A Luxury Collection"), a Tesla dearship, and at least one of the ultraluxry car brands like Rolls and Bentley, as well as a notable offering of truly high-end department stores like Saks, Bloomingdales, as well as boutiques like Versace, Burberry, Tiffany, Louis Vutton, Chanel, Gucci, Hermes and Rolex, usually in one exclusive location. Big enough for Billionaires, but still a noticebly lower profile than the top category. IKEA is standard at this point.

Finally, for that alpha World City (think NYC & LA with Chicago, SF, DC, and Miami possibly there), almost everything in the category above (if not all) is found, plus some of those exclusive brands that are among the first to open, with many "money is no object" establishments. This is where the stuff for the 1% like Sothesby's/Christies real estate and auction houses, exclusive private academies like the Julliard School, Trump buildings, and Michelin 3-star restaurants are omnipresent. Definitely not for the faint-hearted who isn't worth at least upper seven figures.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-25-2019, 02:24 PM
 
Location: Galewood
3,880 posts, read 8,852,873 times
Reputation: 2324
Quote:
Originally Posted by TheTimidBlueBars View Post
Yeah, Apple Stores are kinda rare. Offhand I can only think of three in the Chicago area: two in the city and one in Naperville.

Anyway, yeah, I think the big chains most correlated with status/prestige would include Apple Stores, Pottery Barn, Whole Foods, Trader Joe's, maybe Google Stores (I don't think I've seen one of those so I wouldn't know), maybe Nordstrom. Probably not IKEA; I think those are pretty widespread. And I've seen Top Golfs in some pretty average middle-class areas.
I think there’s 7 total in the Chicagoland area including Oakbrook, Skokie, Orland Park, and Schaumburg...so basically all of the affluent malls.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-25-2019, 02:27 PM
 
Location: BMORE!
7,858 posts, read 6,373,882 times
Reputation: 3709
Quote:
Originally Posted by MB1562 View Post
What's special about a Uniqlo? They are pretty much in every place with a halfway decent population.
They're not really special aside from being affordable and semi decent quality and Designs, but they are limited to only a handful of cities.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply

Quick Reply
Message:


Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > General U.S.
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

¬© 2005-2019, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top