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Old 10-28-2019, 04:16 PM
 
Location: New Jersey
1,095 posts, read 488,579 times
Reputation: 498

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Quote:
Originally Posted by joyride2019 View Post
You can always tell the suburban people who take the commuter rail (or "the Purple Line" as they call it) into Boston. They look so different with the Can I Speak to the Manager haircut, sport jerseys etc. Plus they still have very strong New England accents, including young people. Mostly in town for games/partying so they can be pretty irritating to the locals. I don't think they are "scared" of the city but its very clear they bumpkins in from the countryside for a night out.
I don't live in Boston area, but I live in northern NJ. You can tell the different between the suburban people and people from Paterson. People from both NYC and NJ's nasty cities dress nicer and have more variety of haircuts. I can easily tell what a "Long Island mom" looks like. The mom's from Long Island all have the same look with that Karen haircut.
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Old 10-28-2019, 09:41 PM
Status: "Bostonian in Baltimore" (set 17 days ago)
 
Location: Baltimore
3,143 posts, read 1,678,020 times
Reputation: 2739
Quote:
Originally Posted by btownboss4 View Post
That area plus the core neighborhoods is like 250,000 people (+Brighton, parts of Rosindale/JP) I’d be willing to bet like 1/3rd of the city is those suburban hipster type. And a lot of the people that you peg as Bostonians are probably actually from Malden or Revere or Chelsea.
In 2010 Allston had 29k people. South Boston had 35k. Fenway has 40k. Charles has 18k.

Let’s scale that up to 35k, 45k, 50k and 20k respectively. That’s 140k. But we’ll say 80k Are as you described. I think the type of folks who move into Roslindale JP and Brighton are a very different type of individual than the folks in Southie and Fenway. People in Roslindale and JP are more likely to actual have children here and try to establish roots in the city. Brighton has lots of long time Bostonians as well as professors and other professionals. I’d even argue folks in Charlestown are more mature and family oriented as well.

I’m willing to bet well under a third of the entire city is a suburban hipster type.We were talking more about suburban people in general, not hipster type. Nothing hip about the lionshare of visitors we see at Boston major events not all people from the suburbs are the type I’m talking about. Furthermore, even if they were a third of the city they would still stand out. Just like if you had a third of the city with clown shoes on.

Idk why you’re telling me a lot of the people I peg as Bostonians? I’ve lived there in aware of all that-you know as well as I that a lot of those people are from Boston originally and have friends and family in Boston. Obviously there’s much more in common with Boston in Malden, Revere, and Chelsea than Concord, Millis, Raymond, NH or Old Saybrook, CT.
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Old 10-28-2019, 09:45 PM
Status: "Bostonian in Baltimore" (set 17 days ago)
 
Location: Baltimore
3,143 posts, read 1,678,020 times
Reputation: 2739
Quote:
Originally Posted by potanta View Post
I don't live in Boston area, but I live in northern NJ. You can tell the different between the suburban people and people from Paterson. People from both NYC and NJ's nasty cities dress nicer and have more variety of haircuts. I can easily tell what a "Long Island mom" looks like. The mom's from Long Island all have the same look with that Karen haircut.
Right, it doesn’t matter if there are a tons of Karens. So long as they are in stark contrast to the people you see in the stores/streets/community centers/schools in those cities, towns and neighborhoods-they will be easily identifiable. That doesn’t change automatically just because they get an ‘urban’ address.
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Old 10-28-2019, 11:03 PM
 
7,839 posts, read 9,684,204 times
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Milwaukee. The political divide between Milwaukee and its neighbor, Waukesha County, is astounding.
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Old 10-29-2019, 09:40 AM
 
Location: Madison, NJ
191 posts, read 64,553 times
Reputation: 334
A lot of older New Jerseyans remember the race riots. They remember when cities essentially changed in the course of a few days. My relatives including parents are still wary of most of the cities in NJ, no matter what area of the city. I am 29 and comfortable going pretty much anywhere if I have a reason to do so. The Ironbound, Prudential Center and NJPAC in Newark for example, the Great Falls National Historical Park and Middle Eastern section of Paterson, Star Tavern in Orange for some of the best pizza in NJ. Are these 100% gentrified areas? No, but living in fear of even crossing the city lines of these places means you miss out on a lot of what makes NJ great. I think most people here are comfortable with NYC since that underwent its rebirth decades ago and people feel they have more of a reason to go, like concerts or Broadway, or taking Aunt Vicky to see the tree.
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Old 10-29-2019, 10:29 AM
 
11,263 posts, read 22,712,704 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CCrest182 View Post
In Chicago, it feels this way, even though downtown is fairly safe. Most suburbanites who work in the suburbs rarely, if ever venture into the city, unless they're going to some special event, sporting event, concert etc. And most who commute to work in the city only go there, then immediately go back home once they're off. I'd say there's a fairly large suburban/city divide for the most part in Chicago, and I'm pretty sure feeling unsafe in the city is absolutely at least a part of this divide.
But that's what's drawing them in and that's why so many of them go, to the sporting events, concerts, special events and festivals. Also if you work downtown you're very much in the city every day, working in the loop and going home.

I wouldn't say I notice suburban people here being AFRAID to come into the city, everyone I encounter who avoids the city almost always does it because of traffic, congestion and parking.

Metra helps this quite a bit, as hundreds of thousands of rides between the suburbs and city are given every day, but mostly when I hear people in the burbs whine about the city or say they hate going, it's just because of getting in and getting out.

Most people are at least rationally smart enough to understand they aren't going into the city and then traveling to some obscure dangerous area on the west or south side and standing around on an empty street.
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Old 10-29-2019, 01:05 PM
 
Location: Katy-zuela
4,966 posts, read 9,157,787 times
Reputation: 2482
O.C. hates L.A. County. DFW rarely ventures across the metroplex (Fort Worth hates visiting Dallas) and Collin County/North Dallas doesn't cross I-635.
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Old 10-29-2019, 02:38 PM
 
9,812 posts, read 9,894,828 times
Reputation: 6165
Quote:
Originally Posted by CCrest182 View Post
In Chicago, it feels this way, even though downtown is fairly safe. Most suburbanites who work in the suburbs rarely, if ever venture into the city, unless they're going to some special event, sporting event, concert etc. And most who commute to work in the city only go there, then immediately go back home once they're off. I'd say there's a fairly large suburban/city divide for the most part in Chicago, and I'm pretty sure feeling unsafe in the city is absolutely at least a part of this divide.
No crap?

People go home after work because that’s where their families are because there entire family isn’t in the Loop.

I do t know why it’s shocking that subraban people do mundane everyday things in the suburbs and not the city and only go to the city for things they can’t get in their suburb.

There are people from Glocester who have literally never left the Island and they’re 25 miles from Boston

Isn’t it common sense that if you can get to a grocery store in 5 mUnited away you aren’t going to one 35 miles away?
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Old 10-29-2019, 02:50 PM
 
Location: Chiraq, Crook County
1,703 posts, read 1,014,812 times
Reputation: 1432
Quote:
Originally Posted by Chicago60614 View Post
But that's what's drawing them in and that's why so many of them go, to the sporting events, concerts, special events and festivals. Also if you work downtown you're very much in the city every day, working in the loop and going home.

I wouldn't say I notice suburban people here being AFRAID to come into the city, everyone I encounter who avoids the city almost always does it because of traffic, congestion and parking.

Metra helps this quite a bit, as hundreds of thousands of rides between the suburbs and city are given every day, but mostly when I hear people in the burbs whine about the city or say they hate going, it's just because of getting in and getting out.

Most people are at least rationally smart enough to understand they aren't going into the city and then traveling to some obscure dangerous area on the west or south side and standing around on an empty street.
Maybe my post was a bit outdated and drastically overstating the crime in Chicago, because obviously, the crime ridden areas near the core have been cleaned up DRAMATICALLY over the past 20 or so years. Back in the 90's Comiskey Park used to be right across the freeway from the Taylor Homes projects, and the areas near the park were definitely sketchy. When they were building the new park in the late 80's/early 90's, construction workers would repeatedly find bullet holes in the seats, the bullets coming from the projects. Those projects were closed and demolished in the 2000's, and now the immediate area is drastically safer today. Similarly, the area near the United Center was VERY bad in the 90's. There are still some spotty areas, but gentrification is definitely in full swing in that area nowadays thanks to the absolute explosion of development happening in the West Loop/Fulton Market.

So yeah, things are changing. But I'd still say many suburbanites dislike going to the city, and you're right, it's probably moreso because of traffic, politics.... there's multiple reasons. I still think crime is a factor though, but not nearly as much as it was in the 90's and earlier.
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Old 10-29-2019, 03:07 PM
 
46 posts, read 9,818 times
Reputation: 76
I would definitely say St. Louis County has a healthy fear of St. Louis City in terms of crimes as well as of East Saint Louis. Crime is contained in mostly North St. Louis and East St. Louis, but parts of Mid and North County backing up to the city are dangerous areas. Even the central corridor and South St. Louis can be crime prone. I for one always keep my car locked wherever I am in the city proper.
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