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Old 10-28-2019, 09:20 AM
 
Location: The City of Brotherly Love
1,100 posts, read 770,328 times
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This used to be true for Philadelphia and its metro, but it seems to be fading. I've seen suburbanites in many parts of the city that they would've likely strayed away from in the 2000s: East Fairmount Park, west of 52nd Street in West Philly, Max's at Germantown and Erie, etc. Philly has undergone a tremendous level of change, and people from the suburbs are seemingly less afraid to walk around all parts of the city.

The Philly metro is interesting: at this juncture, suburbanites would avoid other cities in the metro more than the City of Philadelphia. Camden (which is getting better), Chester, Wilmington (also improving), Reading, Trenton (technically not in our metro, but only 17 miles away from Northeast Philly), and nearly all of Delaware County below Baltimore Pike are considered worse than Philly.
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Old 10-28-2019, 09:26 AM
 
58,651 posts, read 83,245,348 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BostonBornMassMade View Post
Undesirable but not 'bad'; definitely shouldnt be grouped with Camden, but neither should Waterbury really..Waterbury is worse than Schenec though.

I dont know that people avoid Schenectady so much as there is no reason and nothing to do there. Its also a very small city of 65k, not sure why it was included in that list tbh
This basically sums it up. You may go to Proctor's Theater, the new Rivers Casino and a few other things, but it isn't as bad as it is made out to be. It has chilled out a bit in recent years.
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Old 10-28-2019, 09:55 AM
Status: "Bostonian in Baltimore" (set 15 days ago)
 
Location: Baltimore
3,122 posts, read 1,673,231 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by joyride2019 View Post
You can always tell the suburban people who take the commuter rail (or "the Purple Line" as they call it) into Boston. They look so different with the Can I Speak to the Manager haircut, sport jerseys etc. Plus they still have very strong New England accents, including young people. Mostly in town for games/partying so they can be pretty irritating to the locals. I don't think they are "scared" of the city but its very clear they bumpkins in from the countryside for a night out.
Spot on!! +1

They like dress up to "act Boston" like how they think people in the city act and its really weird, uncomfortable, and somewhat irritating. I cant tell if theyre like caricatures of themselves or of Matt Damon in Goodwill Hunting..regardless they stick out like sore thumbs. Theyre also definitely super scared of accidentally going to Roxbury Dorchester Mattapan. Some are still erroneously scared of JP.
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Old 10-28-2019, 11:31 AM
 
9,803 posts, read 9,889,202 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by joyride2019 View Post
You can always tell the suburban people who take the commuter rail (or "the Purple Line" as they call it) into Boston. They look so different with the Can I Speak to the Manager haircut, sport jerseys etc. Plus they still have very strong New England accents, including young people. Mostly in town for games/partying so they can be pretty irritating to the locals. I don't think they are "scared" of the city but its very clear they bumpkins in from the countryside for a night out.
I highly doubt you can actually tell the difference because like 1/2 of Southie, Allston and Charlestown were those “suburban kids” like 3 years ago. And most of the Fenway.

And most of the older people grew in in Everett, Somerville, Revere or Boston itself.
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Old 10-28-2019, 11:45 AM
Status: "Bostonian in Baltimore" (set 15 days ago)
 
Location: Baltimore
3,122 posts, read 1,673,231 times
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Originally Posted by btownboss4 View Post
I highly doubt you can actually tell the difference because like 1/2 of Southie, Allston and Charlestown were those “suburban kids” like 3 years ago. And most of the Fenway.

And most of the older people grew in in Everett, Somerville, Revere or Boston itself.
Half of those neighborhoods and most of the Fenway is literally 60k people out of 700k and they still count as suburbanites because we all know what their MO/gig is....we’re aware they were just in the suburbs 3 years ago because they dress and act like it
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Old 10-28-2019, 12:24 PM
 
Location: Wonderland
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New four letter word, except that it's seven letters. "Suburbs." New socioeconomic slur - "Suburbanites."
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Old 10-28-2019, 01:22 PM
 
88 posts, read 25,607 times
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Originally Posted by the resident09 View Post
It doesn’t, I’m Black, consider myself cool, and work near those Arlington neighborhoods mentioned. I would not characterize them as “up tight” or not cool. They are not as hipster as an H Street in DC, but still pretty cool and safe places to hang out for happy hour etc to me.

And also to the contrary of that posters statements, DC is definitely a hangout spot for thousands of people from the suburbs, compared to 20 plus years ago.
The funny thing is, when I see the local news occasionally, it seems totally geared to a suburban crowd who hasn't been in the city in 20 years. For example, crime stories are broken down by quadrant, but when they say a crime happened in NE, that really doesn't tell you anything about where -- it seems only someone with basically no knowledge of the city would be satisfied with that level of geographic vagueness, but I can imagine that 20 - 30 years ago, saying a crime happened in NE was enough for a lot of folks who never venture over there. My point is, tv journalism is super outdated haha, it's more a statement on that, it seems the vast majority of people in the DC suburbs are well aware of the city's transformation and go into the city a lot.
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Old 10-28-2019, 01:24 PM
 
88 posts, read 25,607 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by gt87 View Post
Rochester NY seems to have that stigma where many suburban residents are dead set that if they set foot in "the city" they will immediately be stabbed, raped, and murdered. Most are well-to-do white baby boomers/Gen X'ers who never venture out of their affluent suburbs.
The funny thing is, I used to work in Rochester a lot, and I got to the point where I stayed downtown and walked to the office, just used a cab to get back to the airport at the end of the week. I definitely know what you mean. Lots of my co-workers acted like that was completely nuts.
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Old 10-28-2019, 02:34 PM
 
Location: New York, NY
1,249 posts, read 718,356 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by PhilliesPhan2013 View Post
This used to be true for Philadelphia and its metro, but it seems to be fading. I've seen suburbanites in many parts of the city that they would've likely strayed away from in the 2000s: East Fairmount Park, west of 52nd Street in West Philly, Max's at Germantown and Erie, etc. Philly has undergone a tremendous level of change, and people from the suburbs are seemingly less afraid to walk around all parts of the city.

The Philly metro is interesting: at this juncture, suburbanites would avoid other cities in the metro more than the City of Philadelphia. Camden (which is getting better), Chester, Wilmington (also improving), Reading, Trenton (technically not in our metro, but only 17 miles away from Northeast Philly), and nearly all of Delaware County below Baltimore Pike are considered worse than Philly.
This was surprisingly true of many old school Delco-ians that I met while I went to college there. A lot of the old-heads had parents who had moved out of the city post-WWII or had themselves moved out of the city in the 60's/70s when things started to go down hill. They would talk as if the city still looked like it did in the original Rocky movie.

I had an internship boss during my senior year who was born in South Philly in the 60s, and had moved to DelCo in the 70s. When I told her I was moving into the city after graduation, she tried warning me that Philadelphia was a crime-infested rat hole and "filled with undesirables" (aka black people). When I asked her when was the last time she stepped foot in the city, her answer was.....1990. This was in 2014. She was basing her opinion on a time when Philly was probably at it's lowest and a place she hadn't stepped foot in for 24 years. This exact attitude was/is common amongst the Boomer/GenX, White, working/middle class of DelCo. Luckily the Millennial/GenZ crowd realizes that attitude is grossly outdated.
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Old 10-28-2019, 03:23 PM
 
9,803 posts, read 9,889,202 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BostonBornMassMade View Post
Half of those neighborhoods and most of the Fenway is literally 60k people out of 700k and they still count as suburbanites because we all know what their MO/gig is....we’re aware they were just in the suburbs 3 years ago because they dress and act like it
That area plus the core neighborhoods is like 250,000 people (+Brighton, parts of Rosindale/JP) I’d be willing to bet like 1/3rd of the city is those suburban hipster type. And a lot of the people that you peg as Bostonians are probably actually from Malden or Revere or Chelsea.
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