U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > General U.S.
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 11-07-2019, 02:53 PM
 
Location: Tupelo, Ms
1,349 posts, read 777,907 times
Reputation: 846

Advertisements

Quote:
Originally Posted by Foamposite View Post
If the acccent is dying in MS, then accents must be dying in all 50 states
LoL, The southern/country will always be here in the Sipp. It's just the portion of the population that do have a "twang" isn't the predominant that people expect to hear like in mainstream media. Perhaps in the 1800s.

Last edited by Sharif662; 11-07-2019 at 02:55 PM.. Reason: Additional info.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 11-07-2019, 03:22 PM
 
Location: Madison, NJ
192 posts, read 67,006 times
Reputation: 334
Where to even begin with the wrong stereotypes haha
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 11-07-2019, 05:40 PM
 
Location: Philadelphia
1,124 posts, read 656,685 times
Reputation: 1178
Pennsylvania:

Pennsyltucky: Biggest misconception about Pennsylvania is somehow there is this decline in the state. The reality is cities like Philadelphia, Pittsburgh, Lehigh Valley, Harrisburg, Lancaster and State College are thriving. Yes, rural Pennsylvania definitely has strides to go, but in reality resembles the same challenges as upstate NY and rural New England. This conception bills Pennsylvania as some poor state. When in reality Pennsylvania has some of the wealthiest zip codes in the USA (home to the 3rd largest population of Old Money in the USA and one of it's wealthiest areas the Main Line), and the colonial history that is unmatched of any state in the nation. We are the Keystone State not only because of our geography, but in colonial America, we were considered the "key" state of the new union.

Red / Conservative State: Huge misconception. Pennsylvania has one of the largest Union Member populations in the USA and it is a solid Blue Democratic state. We have what is considered to be one of the most liberal Governor's in the USA, and was re-elected with the 2nd most decisive win in 2018 of any gubernatorial candidate nationwide. There are 1,000,000 more registered Democrats in the state than Republicans. Gerrymandering for decades has made that conception a reality, but the courts have corrected that problem. Pennsylvania is a solid moderate Democratic state. We are not liberal. Just hard working blue democrats.

Pittsburgh is the Midwest: Pittsburgh most definitely is a North East city. It is located as far west as Buffalo, NY and Toronto, Canada. No one from Pittsburgh identifies with the Midwest. People from Pittsburgh would slap you in the face if you said Pittsburgh was the Midwest.

What's so important about Pennsylvania?: Most of America forget's the history of the state. It is considered the most historic state in the nation. More so than Massachusetts. It's largest city, Philadelphia is the only World Heritage City in the USA. Fun Fact: The only reason Pennsylvania is not the U.S Capital today, is because both its Senator's could not agree where to locate the new United States Capital within the state. George Washington wanted the new nation to be located within Pennsylvania. I say this because most of America forgets that we are a rich historic state that can rival any New England state in architecture and history.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 11-07-2019, 08:05 PM
 
Location: Mid-Atlantic
26,229 posts, read 24,972,531 times
Reputation: 32569
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sharif662 View Post
Yes.
I'm from Pennsylvania and I do. My mother was from England, and every once in a great while someone asks me if I've ever lived there. My son was born in North Carolina. My husband and I moved to the Mid-Atlantic when he was six. At least once a year someone asks him if he has lived in the South. I can't hear it.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 11-08-2019, 08:41 AM
 
Location: Tupelo, Ms
1,349 posts, read 777,907 times
Reputation: 846
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gerania View Post
I'm from Pennsylvania and I do. My mother was from England, and every once in a great while someone asks me if I've ever lived there. My son was born in North Carolina. My husband and I moved to the Mid-Atlantic when he was six. At least once a year someone asks him if he has lived in the South. I can't hear it.
......Yes.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 11-08-2019, 09:47 AM
 
7,362 posts, read 14,404,580 times
Reputation: 5047
Quote:
Originally Posted by rowhomecity View Post
Pennsylvania:

Pennsyltucky: Biggest misconception about Pennsylvania is somehow there is this decline in the state. The reality is cities like Philadelphia, Pittsburgh, Lehigh Valley, Harrisburg, Lancaster and State College are thriving. Yes, rural Pennsylvania definitely has strides to go, but in reality resembles the same challenges as upstate NY and rural New England. This conception bills Pennsylvania as some poor state. When in reality Pennsylvania has some of the wealthiest zip codes in the USA (home to the 3rd largest population of Old Money in the USA and one of it's wealthiest areas the Main Line), and the colonial history that is unmatched of any state in the nation. We are the Keystone State not only because of our geography, but in colonial America, we were considered the "key" state of the new union.

Pittsburgh is the Midwest: Pittsburgh most definitely is a North East city. It is located as far west as Buffalo, NY and Toronto, Canada. No one from Pittsburgh identifies with the Midwest. People from Pittsburgh would slap you in the face if you said Pittsburgh was the Midwest.
Comments on these two.

I know some people from the Lehigh Valley area who moved to Philly a while ago. But some have recently moved back to the area because it's on such an upswing and is more affordable. I can't comment personally, but it was interesting to learn that many of those who absolutely love the vibe and culture of Philly were still happy moving back to Allentown and some others. I also know a lot of people from Northwest NJ who are moving across the border. Many work in NW NJ but live in NE PA because it's more affordable.

I dated someone who was in York for some time. I was so shocked at how small the town was, but how much was always going on in the downtown area. It has a great downtown. Then I learned about all the other small towns around the area. I truly think that PA is the absolute best state for someone who wants to live in an urban-ish environment, but with small-town charm, moderate politics, plenty of culture, moderate weather, and near to other major cities (NYC Philly Bmore DC Pittsburgh). And I'm assuming that with the influx of the Latin Caribbean populations, some formerly depressed smaller cities are being revitalized. I was pleasantly surprised at the Puerto Rican influence in York. They even had their own local festivities and hangouts that I accidentally stumbled into once and had a blast at.

I hate that one. I'm not from Pittsburgh. Only driven through and spent a few hours there once. But I even know that still. I also don't understand people who like to talk down about it. I enjoyed my small self-guided tour around the city and I can't wait to actually do a weekend trip there and explore more. It felt far more Northeast than Midwest to me. And while the accent wasn't common, on the few people I encountered with even the slightest accent, it sounded more Northeast than anything.

These are just little personal encounters with PA that have made me really appreciate it not just for Philly. I love Philly, but the rest of the state was a mystery to me for a while and I've grown to really enjoy it after learning about it more personally. Maybe others have different experiences. Such as friends not enjoying the move to Allentown or still finding places like York/Lancaster to be depressed. But from my personal experiences, I was very pleasantly surprised by the entire state.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 11-09-2019, 01:34 PM
 
Location: The Heart of Dixie
8,279 posts, read 12,648,758 times
Reputation: 5163
For Louisiana, the amount of French influence isn't nearly as much as people outside the state think. Yes we were a French colony before the Louisiana Purchase (in addition to parts of the state being British and Spanish) and the influence is very noticeable in parts of the state but its not as intense or widespread as the media and popular perception would have it.

1. Most of the French history was limited to parts of South Louisiana, particularly the Lake Charles and Lafayette areas. There's actually not much French history in central or north Louisiana at all.

2. The French Quarter is the only part of New Orleans that was settled before the Louisiana Purchase. THE ARCHITECTURE OF THE FRENCH QUARTER IS ACTUALLY SPANISH. This is what many tourists really don't know and are shocked to find out. There was a major fire in New Orleans during the colonial period that wiped out the Quarter and it was rebuilt by the Spanish who also had control of the area for many years. The Ursiline Convent is one of the very few buildings remaining from the French. The buildings around Jackson Square including the Cabildo are all built by the Spanish.

3. In New Orleans there is at least as much Irish, Italian, and German ancestry as French, probably more. Italian immigrants historically have played a major role in shaping New Orleans's culture as well.

4. Very few people speak French today and the ones that do are over 60 years old, and Cajun French is NOT the same as France French. Cajun and Creole cuisine is also very different from European French cuisine. Cajun culture probably has more in common with Appalachian culture than with the culture of Paris or Nice.

5. Its hard to find full blooded Cajuns outside of Lafayette and Lake Charles, though partial French ancestry is common in most of the state.

Now the legal system in Louisiana IS still partly based on the Napoleanoic code which I believe has something to do with all the lawsuits and powerful trial lawyers that are in the news. Something about how the law promotes lawsuits and is biased in favor of plaintiffs in most cases, but criminal law is NOT based on French law and is the same as anywhere else. I think outside of lawsuits and civil law, Louisiana law doesn't differ that much from the rest of the country.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 11-11-2019, 07:11 PM
 
Location: Oklahoma
7,555 posts, read 6,553,405 times
Reputation: 6780
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tom Lennox 70 View Post

5. Its hard to find full blooded Cajuns outside of Lafayette and Lake Charles, though partial French ancestry is common in most of the state.
Interesting. I once met a guy from Thibodaux. The day I met him he was celebrating his "birdday".
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 11-12-2019, 11:18 AM
 
5,954 posts, read 3,202,599 times
Reputation: 11558
Colorado:

It’s all mountainous. Nope. The state has plains, mountains, and desert canyons. They are not in equal parts but none of them is a tiny fraction, either.

It’s treed and green OR It’s brown and barren. Both are there, as well as everything in between. However, anyone seeking the luxuriant deciduous hardwood tree habitat of New England (for example) should cross CO off their list.

It snows a lot. Sometimes it does; sometimes it doesn’t. The state is prone to droughts, any time of year.

Everyone skis. Not by a long shot!

Everyone is a hardcore outdoor fitness junkie. Also not by a long shot. However, the percentage of people who frequently do things such as run, bike, or hike probably is higher than in most other states.

Every household has at least one 4WD truck or SUV. Many do, but not all. It is true that 2WD trucks are in the minority of trucks, though.

Colorado is Denver. The tail wags the dog, populationwise, but Denver represents just one face of CO, and even that face is multifaceted itself.

Many people wear cowboy clothes daily. In areas where cattle ranching still goes on, a lot of people do wear the hats, jeans, and boots. But even there, it isn’t “everybody.” In nonranching areas, people mostly dress like people in the rest of the country, adjusting for climate, of course.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 11-12-2019, 03:44 PM
 
Location: North Carolina
480 posts, read 158,458 times
Reputation: 439
Florida

It's Sunny all the time-false, it has the 5th highest rainfall in the US.

Florida is not the South-While Florida definitely deviates a lot from the South it is most certainly in the geographic South and fought on the Confederate side. I get that many Floridians don't identify with Southern culture but plenty of rural Floridians do.

Florida has no accent-Depends on where in the state you live. Many Florida residents are from different parts of the country but you still have areas with a strong native population dating back several generations.

The further North you the further South you are-Mostly true but you'll still hear a Southern drawl all throughout Florida just stay away from the big cites. Tampa to me sounds Southern even though Tampa natives don't always say they're Southern.

Jacksonville has no culture-Jax has a ton of historic areas like Lavilla (Harlem of the South) and Durkevile. Jacksonville has good beaches, A thriving art and poetry scene, A The largest Filopino community in the southeast, A decent sized Puerto Rican community, and Carribean carmvals, plantations, and Music festivals. Jax definitely has something to offer it's just not for everyone.

Orlando its all theme parks- False, Orlando is very much a city.

Florida is all flat-Flordia may not have mountains but it does have quite a bit of hills especially on the Panhandle.

It's all about Miami-Miami may have all the glitz and glamour but people visit and vacation all throughout the state.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply

Quick Reply
Message:


Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > General U.S.
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

© 2005-2019, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top