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Old 11-01-2019, 07:40 PM
 
Location: Lebanon, OH
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Aren’t hipsters passé now?

2014 called, they want their obnoxious fad back.
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Old 11-02-2019, 08:53 AM
 
4,102 posts, read 3,673,493 times
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Originally Posted by woxyroxme View Post
Aren’t hipsters passé now?

2014 called, they want their obnoxious fad back.
Well what’s the new term for upper middle class early 20s liberal arts majors that embrace counter culture? The fads and the terminology change, but the demographic and the “phase” have existed throughout time.
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Old 11-02-2019, 09:56 AM
 
Location: Cleveland, OH
9,150 posts, read 8,095,273 times
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Originally Posted by mjlo View Post
Well what’s the new term for upper middle class early 20s liberal arts majors that embrace counter culture? The fads and the terminology change, but the demographic and the “phase” have existed throughout time.
Counter culture? You mean the most dominant and predictable "culture" seen across every major city in the United States?
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Old 11-02-2019, 09:57 AM
 
Location: Cleveland, OH
9,150 posts, read 8,095,273 times
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Originally Posted by woxyroxme View Post
Aren’t hipsters passé now?

2014 called, they want their obnoxious fad back.
yeah 100%. Was about to post something along these lines.
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Old 11-02-2019, 11:34 AM
Status: "Coffee is at least 3 of my food groups" (set 6 days ago)
 
Location: Chi > DC > Reno > SEA
1,952 posts, read 906,249 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bjimmy24 View Post
Counter culture? You mean the most dominant and predictable "culture" seen across every major city in the United States?
Last night on a flight, I watched a documentary about this art collaborative in Santa Fe called Meow Wolf that gave me a new perspective on this. I think the 20-somethings who were participating in renting out this old warehouse, and turning it into a modern art installation with punk concerts all the time, were genuine in their desire to provide an artistic outlet for people in Santa Fe who couldn't get into the mainstream art scene there. But I also think when there's no pre-defined direction or leadership for an artistic subculture, it will tend to become the same generic "hipster" stuff you see all over the country.
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Old 11-02-2019, 11:49 AM
 
4,102 posts, read 3,673,493 times
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Originally Posted by bjimmy24 View Post
Counter culture? You mean the most dominant and predictable "culture" seen across every major city in the United States?
Yes, that’s exactly what I’m referring to.
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Old 11-02-2019, 11:59 AM
 
Location: Point Loma, San Diego, CA
1,554 posts, read 1,222,216 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by citylove101 View Post
Don’t know about SD, but SF’s hipster days are long gone, largely because the tech thing has made housing in the city so insanely expensive. The young people in nearby Berkeley seem mostly UC students aiming to make money in tech, law, finance, medicine, etc. The hipsters and such seem there, but nothing like a generation ago. I think Bay Area hipsterdom is probably in Oakland now, though I understand it is also getting pricey.

I don’t get to SoCal much, so cannot say what the hip neighborhoods are in LA or SD.
You can either a) live in a neighborhood where the median home price is $700,000, or b) be hip.

You can't do both.

This excludes much of the west coast and New York City from making any claims to being hip.

I've heard the stories about people working as drivers, waiters, and telemarketers in the 1980's and living in Manhattan. I imagine it was really hip then.

We have a neighborhood in San Diego called North Park which thinks its "the cool neighborhood.' It's actually more suburban in some ways than some of the designated suburban areas around here.

In Los Angeles I would say the hip part is around the mid-rise apartments in old downtown where they put a Blue Bottle Coffee. Also nowadays parts of the Valley feel more hip than the neighborhoods that announce themselves as being the hip standard bearers like Silver Lake or Echo Park.
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Old 11-02-2019, 12:52 PM
 
Location: East Tennessee and Atlanta
4,261 posts, read 9,055,852 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Citykid3785 View Post
Yes, no doubt there are many types of hipster. True hipster tends to be an up and coming gentrifying neighborhood, as opposed to the pseudo touristy Instagram worthy established neighborhoods. These can still be hipster in my eyes, but to your point, it's more yuppie/hipster (which I would define myself as, I'm a bit turned off by the grungy/not yet there aesthetic to some of the up and comer areas)
The true, original hipster term though is mainly aimed at struggling, creative, artistic types or interests, living lives culturally, socially, and economically mostly outside of the normal grind, to be "cooler than the rest" of the folks.

This has slowly morphed and been adopted as a term for folks who make money, or with plenty of means, who want to live a simple life with laptops, urban lofts, expensive lattes and wear $600 boots. The appearance of "beatnick chic" with a lucrative job or tons of money in the bank.

So today we have all the once skid row spots in all these cities turning into the most expensive parts of the city--for example, NYC's the Bowery, DUMBO, Williamsburg, Meatpacking District and Long Island City. I love these neighborhoods, and it's a shame they've become so pricey.
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Old 11-04-2019, 09:18 PM
 
Location: Oklahoma
7,483 posts, read 6,520,350 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jjbradleynyc View Post
The true, original hipster term though is mainly aimed at struggling, creative, artistic types or interests, living lives culturally, socially, and economically mostly outside of the normal grind, to be "cooler than the rest" of the folks.

This has slowly morphed and been adopted as a term for folks who make money, or with plenty of means, who want to live a simple life with laptops, urban lofts, expensive lattes and wear $600 boots. The appearance of "beatnick chic" with a lucrative job or tons of money in the bank.
A friend of mind who is old enough to remember the beat generation calls hipsters "Beatnicks sans bongos".
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Old 11-05-2019, 09:19 AM
 
Location: Windsor Ontario/Colchester Ontario
1,519 posts, read 1,408,426 times
Reputation: 1761
Detroit
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