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View Poll Results: Which is higher profile area-Gulf Coast or Great Lake?
Gulf Coast 32 50.00%
Great Lake 32 50.00%
Voters: 64. You may not vote on this poll

 
 
Old 11-12-2019, 12:16 PM
 
Location: Brew City
4,663 posts, read 2,757,881 times
Reputation: 6406

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Quote:
Originally Posted by As Above So Below... View Post
You realize that the Gulf Coast (Houston specifically) is the energy capital of the US. Not just the oil and gas capital of the US. The energy giants that mainly source oil and gas right now will the be the green energy giants of tomorrow. They, by far, are the biggest investors in renewable energy. Not only that, but outside those companies Houston has some of the most green energy jobs in the country.

Long story short, the Gulf Coast region will still be the ones controlling energy even after oil and gas is no longer used.
This may be true but as someone pointed out, we have the fresh water. Water will be the liquid gold of the future.
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Old 11-12-2019, 12:37 PM
 
Location: Mass.
44 posts, read 10,190 times
Reputation: 85
I'd say Great Lakes due to the extreme importance placed on this region in presidential politics alone.
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Old 11-12-2019, 12:53 PM
 
Location: Minneapolis, MN
6,329 posts, read 3,645,348 times
Reputation: 8015
Quote:
Originally Posted by As Above So Below... View Post
You realize that the Gulf Coast (Houston specifically) is the energy capital of the US. Not just the oil and gas capital of the US. The energy giants that mainly source oil and gas right now will the be the green energy giants of tomorrow. They, by far, are the biggest investors in renewable energy. Not only that, but outside those companies Houston has some of the most green energy jobs in the country.

Long story short, the Gulf Coast region will still be the ones controlling energy even after oil and gas is no longer used.



Then they better start now because "tomorrow" is coming soon. The Great Lakes is still a more vital region, regardless. On a side note, it's also laughable when people try to claim Houston will overtake Chicago. Hah. hah. hah.
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Old 11-12-2019, 02:13 PM
 
Location: Chiraq, Crook County
1,703 posts, read 1,014,812 times
Reputation: 1432
The Gulf Coast wins on oil/energy and probably tourism, but the Great Lakes dominates pretty much everywhere else.
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Old 11-12-2019, 02:25 PM
 
30,675 posts, read 28,412,163 times
Reputation: 19265
Quote:
Originally Posted by BadgerFilms View Post
Then they better start now because "tomorrow" is coming soon. The Great Lakes is still a more vital region, regardless. On a side note, it's also laughable when people try to claim Houston will overtake Chicago. Hah. hah. hah.
How is it laughable? No one knows the future, and I'm sure it seemed laughable when it was predicted that Chicago would eventually become the nation's third largest city after being the second largest for so long. Nothing stays the same.
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Old 11-12-2019, 11:08 PM
 
818 posts, read 240,229 times
Reputation: 560
The answer is the Gulf Coast, and it's not even close.

The concentration of energy resources, along with the intelligence and capital that controls them, is more than sufficient to give the region the victory over the Great Lakes, considering how vital such power is to allowing function for the modern economy. Such experience and intelligence also ensures that the region remains in strong relevance even as the world shifts to cleaner energy sources. Additionally, the region is also home to other important natural resources, including a big supply of salt concentrated among many naturally occurring domes within the region.

The Gulf Coast also represents a more open gateway to the world at large compared to the Great Lakes. Whether it's the wide selection of Latin America, or the crucial Panama Canal, or Europe and Africa overseas the Atlantic, the connections are many.

As far as water supply is concerned, the frequent thunderstorms, combined with intense rainfall rates and aquifers for recharge, ensure that the Gulf Coast is without issue in that department. Now, the Great Lakes no doubt are vast reservoirs of fresh water - but there would still need to be a purification process, as you can't exactly drink straight from a lake. That purification process would be but a step below the desalination that the Gulf could do anyway if needed.

And overall, there's just much better quality of life to be achieved naturally along the Gulf Coast. And there's no doubt of it, between the much better beaches overall, as well as the milder winters that allow for wider variety of unique habitats, biodiversity, cultivated vegetation, and agriculture. Such equable climate and landscape is crucial in sustaining large populations, hence the success of the Indus Valley and Chinese Empires that existed in similar climate zones.

Last edited by ScrappyJoe; 11-12-2019 at 11:18 PM..
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Old 11-13-2019, 12:26 AM
 
Location: Cleveland, OH
1,325 posts, read 696,398 times
Reputation: 798
Quote:
Originally Posted by ScrappyJoe View Post
The answer is the Gulf Coast, and it's not even close.

The concentration of energy resources, along with the intelligence and capital that controls them, is more than sufficient to give the region the victory over the Great Lakes, considering how vital such power is to allowing function for the modern economy. Such experience and intelligence also ensures that the region remains in strong relevance even as the world shifts to cleaner energy sources. Additionally, the region is also home to other important natural resources, including a big supply of salt concentrated among many naturally occurring domes within the region.

The Gulf Coast also represents a more open gateway to the world at large compared to the Great Lakes. Whether it's the wide selection of Latin America, or the crucial Panama Canal, or Europe and Africa overseas the Atlantic, the connections are many.

As far as water supply is concerned, the frequent thunderstorms, combined with intense rainfall rates and aquifers for recharge, ensure that the Gulf Coast is without issue in that department. Now, the Great Lakes no doubt are vast reservoirs of fresh water - but there would still need to be a purification process, as you can't exactly drink straight from a lake. That purification process would be but a step below the desalination that the Gulf could do anyway if needed.

And overall, there's just much better quality of life to be achieved naturally along the Gulf Coast. And there's no doubt of it, between the much better beaches overall, as well as the milder winters that allow for wider variety of unique habitats, biodiversity, cultivated vegetation, and agriculture. Such equable climate and landscape is crucial in sustaining large populations, hence the success of the Indus Valley and Chinese Empires that existed in similar climate zones.
Typical arrogant Texan point of view.
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Old 11-13-2019, 07:45 AM
 
Location: Cleveland, OH
9,160 posts, read 8,099,220 times
Reputation: 8113
Great Lakes, not even close.
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Old 11-13-2019, 07:58 AM
 
1,126 posts, read 422,667 times
Reputation: 1191
Historically the Great Lakes. Convenience to the Northeast’s ports once the Erie Canal was completed made that an economic powerhouse. But shipping’s prominence in the US economic engine has declined, and even then it has moved south. I’d say it’s a worthy discussion of which is better suited for a city at this moment, but the trends are fairly clear for the future.
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Old 11-13-2019, 08:26 AM
 
Location: Cleveland, OH
9,160 posts, read 8,099,220 times
Reputation: 8113
Quote:
Originally Posted by Heel82 View Post
Historically the Great Lakes. Convenience to the Northeast’s ports once the Erie Canal was completed made that an economic powerhouse. But shipping’s prominence in the US economic engine has declined, and even then it has moved south. I’d say it’s a worthy discussion of which is better suited for a city at this moment, but the trends are fairly clear for the future.
How sustainable is the continuation of development in the south?
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