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Old 11-05-2019, 02:59 PM
 
Location: Cleveland, OH
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I hear often from people or reading articles online saying "You have to be a tourist in city." Meaning that you have to explore what your city has to offer and/or appreciate your city. That you need to have a balanced view of your city. Is it true? Or is it untrue?
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Old 11-05-2019, 03:51 PM
Status: "Coffee is at least 3 of my food groups" (set 6 days ago)
 
Location: Chi > DC > Reno > SEA
1,952 posts, read 906,249 times
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Well, if you stay in your own neighborhood all the time, you certainly won't have a very balanced or informed view of your city. But you might find your opinion growing more critical as you explore around, seeing more inequality and segregation and economic decay. On the other hand, you might like how much diversity and variety there is and find cool parks and secluded areas and historic districts and ethnic neighborhoods that you never knew existed.

I think trying the typical touristy stuff in your city is also a good idea, but for a different reason: you get better at recommending sites for people visiting and you get more of an outsider's perspective.
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Old 11-05-2019, 05:10 PM
 
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Yes and no.

Outside of the MOA, the Twin Cities don’t have a lot of ‘touristy’ stuff. Most of the recommended things to do are public and cheap/free (Stone Arch Bridge, Minnehaha Falls, Stillwater downtown, bike/hike/swim/walk around the lakes) or standard big city stuff (MLB/NHL/NFL/NBA/MLS) or food places to eat.
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Old 11-05-2019, 09:50 PM
 
Location: The Big Apple and Shytown and Miami and Dallas and Milwalkie and St Paul-Mineopolis n DCMV n WestBay
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For Los Angeles, you need to do the opposite, be a local to appreciate the city.
Most tourists do the same things. Things they see on T.V. and I group them into this "fantasy tourism"category--- include Disneyland, Universal Studios, Hollywood sign and walk of fame, Beverly Hills and celebrity homes, Santa Monica/Venice/Malibu, The grove mall, Melrose, things they see in movies and reality TV, instagram.
I cant think of any other big US city so much devoted into this fantasy type tourism
Locals dont focus on looking into that aspect of LA. Sure they go to Disneyland or Universal and the beaches. But they do other things like enjoy the vast variety of foods from all over the world and the trendsetters opening up shop. Locals go to museums, special events and annual events, sport games, see the architectural gems, explore new areas and hip areas. Most have been to every mall and shopping area most likely. They go to all these different musical concerts and at venus like the Hollywood Bowl, the Greek Theater, the Dorothy, Disney Concert Hall. LA has a good zoo, aquarium, many botanical gardens, horse racetrack, casinos., so much hiking opportunities. Locals seek food trucks and taco spots. The thing is you dont see noticeable tourists in these areas. I think they are missing out.
I only say this because in NYC most tourists do the museums, the architecture, try all the foods, learn the history via cultural buildings and sites like 9/11 memorial, statue of liberty, etc, attend a Broadway play and start checking out all the neighborhoods esp in Manhattan/Brooklyn. I would say many do similar things in SF, and DC, Chicago.
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Old 11-05-2019, 09:55 PM
Status: "Coffee is at least 3 of my food groups" (set 6 days ago)
 
Location: Chi > DC > Reno > SEA
1,952 posts, read 906,249 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by saybanana View Post
I only say this because in NYC most tourists do the museums, the architecture, try all the foods, learn the history via cultural buildings and sites like 9/11 memorial, statue of liberty, etc, attend a Broadway play and start checking out all the neighborhoods esp in Manhattan/Brooklyn. I would say many do similar things in SF, and DC, Chicago.
Maybe in SF, I'd believe a lot of tourists go to actual neighborhoods like Haight-Ashbury and the Castro. In Chicago though it seems like a lot of people just stay downtown the whole time. I guess that makes sense - every city has neighborhoods, not every city has long walls of skyscrapers, many of them old and architecturally significant, abutting a large body of water. Still, I prefer to visit cities more holistically.

And yeah, I get that same impression about tourists visiting LA. I don't remember the details about vacation time at my job and I'm gonna have to be here for this project for a while, but at some point I want to take off a few days, fly out, and really explore the area.
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Old 11-06-2019, 04:47 AM
 
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I think it's helpful. Personally, at least at times, I like to live like I'm on vacation and do the things tourists (or non-tourists, for that matter would do). People often have an overly negative impression of there area, or a biased view towards positive of others, because, they're only seeing that area and what it's like with a vacationers mindset vs. someone who is living there. So, they end up seeing the nicest of what other cities have to offer.. and not their own. That said, not just hitting touristy stuff. Going on hikes, hitting local neighborhoods, restaurants, etc., learning about the architecture, history, etc. of an area is more exciting to me than visiting obvious tourist traps. So, YMMV. Then, there's also just a preference for certain activities over others.... if one only moderately enjoys going to the beach, and really enjoys mountains, for instance, there is only so much past an initial exploration that is really going to have them change their mind on that. And vice versa.
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Old 11-06-2019, 07:17 AM
 
1,529 posts, read 1,165,935 times
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No, you don't NEED to, but I think it's a good idea. It's easy to get complacent in your own city. When we moved to Atlanta, the most common thing we heard from neighbors in our first year was some version of "you guys are soooooo adventurous. I'm embarrassed to admit we've lived here 25 years and never been to ___________ (GA aquarium, the zoo, the art museum, the mountains, etc.....).

I also think being a tourist in your own city doesn't just mean one should visit all the big tourist attractions. I think moreso it means to embody spontaneity, adventure, and get out of your comfort zone. Trying a new coffee shop, spending the night in a hotel in a cool area of the city, walking on foot, etc.
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Old 11-06-2019, 07:23 AM
 
Location: Boston, MA
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I don't do the touristy stuff in Boston but I do some of the things tourists do. For example, my wife and I go to the North End for dinner. Generally speaking though, we try to get out of town when possible.
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Old 11-06-2019, 10:52 AM
 
Location: Kansas City North
183 posts, read 82,295 times
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Depends on how tourist trappy your city is.
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Old 11-06-2019, 12:36 PM
 
Location: The High Desert
7,349 posts, read 4,039,442 times
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Traveling and experiencing other places helps to put your own city in perspective. You might take a visitor's view of your own city as others might see it. My city is "blessed" with a huge annual (bucket list) event so we have thousands of visitors in town for about two weeks. We are used to seeing people wandering around lost or going the wrong way for a few weeks. Everything is geared toward that event but there are many assets that residents may, or may not, take advantage of. People live in a bubble and could benefit from breaking out to better appreciate what they have.
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