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Old 12-05-2019, 10:45 PM
 
Location: East Tennessee and Atlanta
4,774 posts, read 9,254,254 times
Reputation: 3521

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Quote:
Originally Posted by newgensandiego View Post

The high rise construction is impressive, but the overall growth is pretty mid-tier for sunbelt metros.
Yeah, agreed. Nashville's downtown does--and will to a far greater degree--exceed its city size and metro size expectations.

For a city of about 680,000 and a metro of 2 million and growing, Nashville's downtown is better (I definitely think) than bigger cities like Phoenix (4.8 million metro), St Louis (2.8 million), San Antonio (2.5 million), and Charlotte (2.6 million), for example.

The skyscraper construction is exciting to watch, with about 12 + under construction currently, and another 15-20 +planned. Nashville's booming vibrancy is exciting to see.
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Old 12-06-2019, 12:26 AM
 
Location: Mainland Europe
115 posts, read 17,855 times
Reputation: 98
Quote:
Originally Posted by SteelCityRising View Post
With declining birth rates and waning immigration this country's growth rate overall will likely begin to decelerate.

The hardest-hit states---states that will likely see population declines in the future---will be those with high populations of non-Hispanic whites (low birth-rate group) and low numbers of unskilled immigrants (high birth-rate group). States like WV, VT, ME, CT, MS, IL, and PA are already seeing either stagnant populations or just very minimal growth for these reasons. If growth in Greater NYC cools in terms of population growth, then NY can be added to that list as well as Upstate NY is very similar demographically to PA. I predict a similar future for KS, NE, SD, ND as well.
Very good point, you are totally right and this is the reason why I don't want to move to a sunbelt state if I ever move to the United States (I wish). I don't want to live in a latin majority state with high crime and corruption like every latin american country.

I will go toward North, Denver, Boise, Seattle, Minneapolis, Omaha for example.
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Old 12-06-2019, 08:34 AM
 
550 posts, read 298,421 times
Reputation: 740
Quote:
Originally Posted by jjbradleynyc View Post
Yeah, agreed. Nashville's downtown does--and will to a far greater degree--exceed its city size and metro size expectations.

For a city of about 680,000 and a metro of 2 million and growing, Nashville's downtown is better (I definitely think) than bigger cities like Phoenix (4.8 million metro), St Louis (2.8 million), San Antonio (2.5 million), and Charlotte (2.6 million), for example.

The skyscraper construction is exciting to watch, with about 12 + under construction currently, and another 15-20 +planned. Nashville's booming vibrancy is exciting to see.
Hmmm I disagree on that point. Nashville may have a more tourist centric downtown for sure, but to call it better than Charlotte's is a bit of a stretch. Especially considering Charlotte is under going a downtown boom as well and already has mass transit though it's core.

New high rises don't make a downtown better. There are many other factors that should be weighed.
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Old 12-06-2019, 10:26 PM
 
Location: East Tennessee and Atlanta
4,774 posts, read 9,254,254 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by NC2ATL60 View Post
Hmmm I disagree on that point. Nashville may have a more tourist centric downtown for sure, but to call it better than Charlotte's is a bit of a stretch. Especially considering Charlotte is under going a downtown boom as well and already has mass transit though it's core.

New high rises don't make a downtown better. There are many other factors that should be weighed.
Good points.

I think I was basing it on dynamic nature and vibrancy of downtown, the energy and business. Nashville definitely wins on that metric.

Nashville needs a mass transit. Nashville has more construction going on than Charlotte, but Charlotte is still growing very well. I've been to both Charlotte and Nashville in the past year, and both are amazing cities in general, very livable.

I liked Charlotte's downtown a lot-but it was much quieter just because it did not have the energy of Nashville. It has tons of livable areas though, and I liked that. The rail is great too, and I like that Charlotte is compact downtown.

Nashville however, has a level of excitement and energy that moves it to another level, and for that reason it tops Charlotte in my book, still.
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Old 12-07-2019, 09:40 AM
 
1,369 posts, read 457,877 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by newgensandiego View Post
Connecticut, Illinois, and West Virginia are already losing population since 2010. Vermont, Rhode Island, Mississippi, New York, Pennsylvania, and Maine have grown less than 1%.

As usual, the doom and gloom of California in terms of population growth is overstated. Between 2010 and 2018, the state grew by 6.2%, which is above the national average (impressive considering its already huge population). It is the 19th fastest growing by growth percentage and third-fastest growing by absolute numbers (right behind Florida and far head of #4 North Carolina).

Locally here in San Diego, growth is still pretty robust. I'm not sure how the remaining two years of the decade will pan out, but San Diego is currently on target to gain ~150,000 new residents during this decade. That is the highest absolute increase for San Diego since the '80s and the third highest absolute increase for a decade in San Diego's history.

There is a ton of medium-density infill development throughout the county, notably 4-5 story stick-built multi-family.
Unfortunately San Diego won't be able to build higher than 500 ft until at least 2035 when the airport reaches capacity thus creating an opportunity to close it and build a new one elsewhere.
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Old 12-07-2019, 09:56 AM
 
1,369 posts, read 457,877 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by pnwguy2 View Post

* "Last year’s growth, however, was the weakest in 20 years. It came on the heels of tepid growth the year before. The region saw fewer births last year, an uptick in deaths, and a significant number of residents leaving Houston. If not for a surge in international migration, Houston’s population growth would have been weaker still." Source: Houston.org/news
How? Why did Houston go from booming like crazy to almost no growth?
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Old 12-09-2019, 07:34 AM
 
Location: IN
21,209 posts, read 36,824,530 times
Reputation: 13759
Quote:
Originally Posted by KoNgFooCj View Post
How? Why did Houston go from booming like crazy to almost no growth?
Houston is still more dependent on energy related jobs and their ancillary economic impacts. Therefore, the local economy is more impacted regarding job growth and population growth rates. However, economy there is more diversified now compared to the 1980's last large-scale oil bust that resulted in collapsing prices.
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Old 12-09-2019, 03:44 PM
 
Location: Katy,Texas
3,720 posts, read 1,875,582 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by KoNgFooCj View Post
How? Why did Houston go from booming like crazy to almost no growth?
It didn't go to no growth it was the third fastest growing city last year. The 2018-2019 numbers haven't been released yet, unless I've been mistaken, but after Phoenix and Dallas isn't no growth, it only went to no growth in terms of attracting people domestically. That could almost completely be explained by Harvey, people definitely left the metro area entirely post-Harvey. But within 2 years that blip will likely disappear IMHO.
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Old 12-11-2019, 08:41 PM
 
Location: Las Vegas
357 posts, read 265,813 times
Reputation: 354
^^ Exactly. As long as Houston continues to boost jobs, people will come.
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Old 12-11-2019, 10:13 PM
 
31,117 posts, read 28,834,850 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by NigerianNightmare View Post
It didn't go to no growth it was the third fastest growing city last year. The 2018-2019 numbers haven't been released yet, unless I've been mistaken, but after Phoenix and Dallas isn't no growth, it only went to no growth in terms of attracting people domestically. That could almost completely be explained by Harvey, people definitely left the metro area entirely post-Harvey. But within 2 years that blip will likely disappear IMHO.
Houston is a formidable city and is used to riding out downturns. I've noticed an uptick in some of my peers relocating there within the past year or two and I'm more than certain that domestic migration will pick up within the next two to three years.
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