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Old 11-08-2019, 11:54 AM
 
Location: Aurora, CO
6,774 posts, read 10,724,461 times
Reputation: 10335

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Vegabern View Post
Field hockey maybe. That part of Texas gets a few snowstorms every year, but it's not cold enough and there's not enough water for outdoor ice hockey.
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Old 11-08-2019, 01:15 PM
 
Location: Denver via Austin
3,334 posts, read 6,717,447 times
Reputation: 4118
Quote:
Originally Posted by opossum1 View Post
I completely disagree. I just did big trip almost entire rural America staying off the main roads and seen mostly well-cared properties (even a bit too manicured for my taste). I don't consider a couple of old cars on large rural acreage trashy by the way. In towns - super-manicured. I was marveling at that, actually. Clean, neat towns including some notoriously poor states hit by drug epidemics like WV.

Heck, I even been to infamous Centralia, PA hit by underground coal fires - they didn't let their Main street fall into disrepair despite almost entire town being permanently evacuated long time ago.
Colorado really stood out in terms of abandoned buildings in disrepair, I assure you. It's a rare sight in most other places.

The links you posted - it does not look even remotely as bad as what I've seen in Colorado. I'm not posting pictures because there're occupied homes next to the blight and I don't want to invade their privacy. I'm talking about rubble of fully collapsed homes and homes severely leaning right onto neighbor's lot, while lots are extremely small (unlike in your first link).
Can you at least give a town name? I’m curious myself.
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Old 11-08-2019, 01:24 PM
 
Location: Tennessee
25,727 posts, read 19,118,776 times
Reputation: 30616
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mike from back east View Post
The hollowing out of rural areas is what you saw. Highly rural towns have been shrinking for decades, IMO over 125 years as farm machinery reduced the need for large farm families and younger generations moved to cities to find work, etc. That trend still continues and IMO that's what you saw. I saw the same thing when driving around Big Spring, TX this past summer. No jobs there ... people can't find a buyer for the home ... they drive off and leave it behind ... saw bunches of such dilapidated and falling down homes.
Not only that, but many times, a family might have owned a home. The aged owners die, subsequent generations live in other areas, and there might not only not be a buyer, but the property may be forgotten about!
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Old 11-08-2019, 03:27 PM
 
Location: The High Desert
7,763 posts, read 4,216,628 times
Reputation: 14608
Years ago people would have salvaged what they thought they could use if a place was abandoned. Now there isn't enough economic growth or incentive to actually invest the time or energy. You can park a mobile home on the lot and don't even need the firewood from the tumble down shack.

There actually is a market in old barn wood and there are brick rustlers in the cities that make off with a small fortune in used bricks when nobody is looking.
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Old 11-08-2019, 07:37 PM
 
1,166 posts, read 1,333,384 times
Reputation: 2518
i was pretty shocked to see the pictures of Mississippi and Colorado. Actually the pictures of the tiny houses in West Va didn't look so bad because they were well tended.

It is amazing how different small towns are in different areas of the country. I have discovered small towns in my adopted state ( Illinois ) and neighboring state (Wisconsin) because my kids go to college in Champaign and Madison. In the Midwest, or at least in the two states mentioned, most small towns are well kept and not in disrepair. The only town I have seen that looked remotely depressed in my off road adventures off the main highways was Danville, Illinois, which has seen better days. But overall, I am amazed how well kept they are, despite probably depressed real estate values.
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Old 11-09-2019, 10:37 AM
 
Location: Wonderland
48,042 posts, read 38,592,487 times
Reputation: 68732
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mike from back east View Post
The hollowing out of rural areas is what you saw. Highly rural towns have been shrinking for decades, IMO over 125 years as farm machinery reduced the need for large farm families and younger generations moved to cities to find work, etc. That trend still continues and IMO that's what you saw. I saw the same thing when driving around Big Spring, TX this past summer. No jobs there ... people can't find a buyer for the home ... they drive off and leave it behind ... saw bunches of such dilapidated and falling down homes.

I can't imagine that. Big Spring, TX is in the middle of an oil and gas boom, and has been for several years. The unemployment rate is 3.8 percent. It's job growth rate is higher than that of the US in general. It's just a small town between Lubbock and Midland but it's not a particularly depressed part of the country or of Texas.

I mean, I'm sure that it's not a place I'd want to live but I wanted to correct the misinformation that there are "no jobs there " or "people can't find a buyer for their home."

Last edited by KathrynAragon; 11-09-2019 at 10:56 AM..
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Old 11-09-2019, 10:59 AM
 
Location: Denver via Austin
3,334 posts, read 6,717,447 times
Reputation: 4118
Quote:
Originally Posted by KathrynAragon View Post
I can't imagine that. Big Spring, TX is in the middle of an oil and gas boom, and has been for several years. The unemployment rate is 3.8 percent. It's job growth rate is higher than that of the US in general. It's just a small town between Lubbock and Midland but it's not a particularly depressed part of the country or of Texas.
I grew up in Lubbock. Big Spring is known for being particularly terrible. The only oil money in West Texas with any sense of personal pride lives in Midland or maybe Lubbock.
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Old 11-09-2019, 11:12 AM
 
21,421 posts, read 40,046,988 times
Reputation: 20081
Quote:
Originally Posted by KathrynAragon View Post
I can't imagine that. Big Spring, TX is in the middle of an oil and gas boom, and has been for several years. The unemployment rate is 3.8 percent. It's job growth rate is higher than that of the US in general. It's just a small town between Lubbock and Midland but it's not a particularly depressed part of the country or of Texas.

I mean, I'm sure that it's not a place I'd want to live but I wanted to correct the misinformation that there are "no jobs there " or "people can't find a buyer for their home."
I personally drove those streets this past summer, there are dilapidated and collapsing homes in Big Spring, TX,
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Old 11-09-2019, 11:38 AM
 
Location: Wonderland
48,042 posts, read 38,592,487 times
Reputation: 68732
Quote:
Originally Posted by Westerner92 View Post
I grew up in Lubbock. Big Spring is known for being particularly terrible. The only oil money in West Texas with any sense of personal pride lives in Midland or maybe Lubbock.
Well, like I said, I don't want to live there either, but listen - that area is not "typical" of small town Texas, or Texas in general for that matter.

My husband works in that area but no, we don't live there. It's very ugly terrain for starters. I have lived in Texas for 25 years and that particular area is uniquely ugly in my opinion.
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Old 11-09-2019, 11:39 AM
 
Location: Wonderland
48,042 posts, read 38,592,487 times
Reputation: 68732
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mike from back east View Post
I personally drove those streets this past summer, there are dilapidated and collapsing homes in Big Spring, TX,
Maybe so, maybe not, who knows. But if there are, it's not for the reasons you assumed.

Here's the deal - that's not typical of Texas. It's not even typical of that region of Texas. That particular area is one of the ugliest areas in the US in my opinion. I don't know why you were even there, but my condolences.

That being said, it's not because there are no jobs. Unemployment is low in Big Spring.
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