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Old 05-06-2008, 10:40 PM
 
Location: USA
13,266 posts, read 10,409,248 times
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What cities do you think will be most influential in the future...10 years, 20 years...and why, please provide some reasoning of why you tihnk what you think.

I personally think NYC is positioning itself to remain the powerhouse that it is. It is undergoing a huge development boom, and is continually seeking ways to improve.

I feel that Houston has the capability of becoming a major player if its able to control its sprawl and offer a more urban environment (I foresee urban living becoming more desireable due to many factors in the future). It already has a booming economy, diverse population, and many world class amenities.

I feel that Chicago is a very underrated (or should I say, overlooked) city. It is by no means not known on an international level, but on a domestic level many people have never been to Chicago or know much about it. It has not yet shaken its "gangster" stigma. It is however experiencing a huge development boom and is expected to increase in city proper population. The Olympic bid could only solitify it as a world power.

I also see a revival of some northeastern cities such as Baltimore and Philly. They seemed to have held on through some tough times and could possibly return to their former glory.

I feel like San Fran, Seattle, and Boston are comfortable where they are (they should be, they are great cities) and will probably just seek to maintain there unique identities.
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Old 05-06-2008, 10:45 PM
 
Location: The Heart of Dixie
7,834 posts, read 12,351,284 times
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I think the cities most poised for dramatic growth in the near future are Raleigh, followed by Charlotte, Las Vegas, Phoenix, Atlanta, and Dallas-Fort Worth.

Cities poised to decline: Detroit, Cleveland, Baltimore, Pittsburgh, Philly.

New York City and Los Angeles will decline but not to the extent that they lose their place as the country's most important cities...the Big One notwithstanding.....
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Old 05-06-2008, 11:17 PM
 
2,506 posts, read 7,762,846 times
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Pittsburgh has been on a pretty good ascent for quite a few years. Phila. is doing alot to revitalize also.
Remember, there is a difference between poised for growth and poised for the future.
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Old 05-07-2008, 12:00 AM
 
Location: Zurich, Switzerland/ Piedmont, CA
32,397 posts, read 55,250,153 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Gtownoe View Post
I feel like San Fran (is) comfortable.
Huh?

Do you think competing with Bangalore and Chennai is easy? The quest to remain the global epicenter of technology is a battle that is fought on many fronts and goes far beyond our borders. My friend is an Angel Investor in Singapore and he tells me that literally every major city in Asia wants to supplant Silicon Valley and they are hellbent. LOL

What that means is SF needs to set aside its parasol and put on its boxing gloves.

We've got to be on top of breakthroughs like before they're even developed and there is an entire army of engineers awake probably right now at 11pm in their homes trying to figure out how to dazzle the world next. Heck, people here have sleeping bags at their cubicles.

If being stressed out workaholics is "comfortable", then I guess we are.
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Old 05-07-2008, 12:08 AM
 
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Most cities will be fine. The only city I'm really scared for is Detroit. It's falling apart, but unlike many other rust belt cities, most of the citizens in Detroit don't seem to want to do anything about it. It seems like they'd rather just run away from the problem.

In terms of prosperity...well, I think the Southwest will continue to bloom. Especially now that the water shortage is being resolved (piping in water from northern counties, with plans for desalination in the future).
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Old 05-07-2008, 12:45 AM
 
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The west coast will prosper as the eastern economies mature and continue to expand. The ports of Seattle, Tacoma, Oakland, Los Angeles and Long Beach will thrive with the booming imports/exports industry.
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Old 05-07-2008, 07:59 AM
 
11,183 posts, read 22,407,581 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Tom Lennox 70 View Post
I think the cities most poised for dramatic growth in the near future are Raleigh, followed by Charlotte, Las Vegas, Phoenix, Atlanta, and Dallas-Fort Worth.

Cities poised to decline: Detroit, Cleveland, Baltimore, Pittsburgh, Philly.

New York City and Los Angeles will decline but not to the extent that they lose their place as the country's most important cities...the Big One notwithstanding.....
Haha, I would have said something to the opposite!

Gas prices alone will have a huge impact on the cities with weak public transit, and a ton of sprawl. I can't imagine everyone in Phoenix or Dallas driving 40 miles every day if we end up getting $7-8 a gallon gas. It's going to have a huge impact on the economy. I think 100 years from now people might look back at the personal car as a huge road block in America's long term growth. Car, yes, but EVERYONE driving their own car, no.

I also worry that as these lightly populated but sprawling suburbs keep growing, places with say only 250,000 people in 100 square miles. Once the "new" factor goes out of the houses, and especially the infrastructure there, taxes are going to be quite high. People will move out, because you only have 250,000 people to repair roads/sewers/schools/etc. etc. etc., but you're having to do it over 100 square miles. Say in Chicago, you have the same basic infrastructure, but you have around 1,200,000 people to pay taxes to support that (and obviously a lot more, but not per person that you'll have in a place with 3,000 people per square mile). I think people will just move on, and the suburb will decline. Not to mention many of the cooke-cutter houses in these places aren't really meant to be the "family home", they're just stopping off grounds for new families. Once they get to be 30-40 years old, people are going to want more quality, and they'll start to deteriorate. Like what's happening in many of the larger cities, but at least much of their architecture and solid/detailed exterior supports rehabbing as opposed to just moving on. It's all a huge cycle.

Just my opionion based on what I've researched and rationalized in my own mind.
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Old 05-07-2008, 09:02 AM
 
Location: Chariton, Iowa
681 posts, read 2,773,845 times
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Here's my thoughts, based on a purely cultural "zeitgeist" idea...not related to development or economics at all.

I've said it before, but I think Chicago is going to be a culturally dominant city for the next 10 years or so. The 2016 Olympics is going to create a flurry of activity and "buzz" surrounding the city...starting as soon as construction begins. Plus if Obama gets elected, the city is going to be "in vogue" the same way Texas has been for the last 8 years, or at least as it was when Bush was popular.

I think Texas (with the exception of Austin, maybe) is losing it's grip on the zeitgeist. The sort of larger-than-life, brash, hubristic, "God's country" attitude is going to subside in favor of a more modest, international mindset...globalization is going to be a big part of that.

New York is going to rise in importance as a "world city". Los Angeles is going to lose importance as Hollywood goes global and it becomes less and less the center of the entertainment universe.

I think some rust-belt cities are going to rise in importance as the media/culture latches on to the idea of the "post-industrial American city". Pittsburgh, Baltimore, Milwaukee could be break out cities.
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Old 05-07-2008, 04:09 PM
 
Location: Cleveland Suburbs
2,554 posts, read 6,003,968 times
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Pittsburgh, Cleveland and Philly are all on the upswing. Esp with all the new MAJOR construction projects going on in these cities. You have to visit to see this for youself, instead of the old negative stories you hear about these cities.

Now Detroit is a different story.
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Old 05-07-2008, 05:27 PM
 
Location: Somewhere extremely awesome
3,038 posts, read 2,469,924 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Traveler87 View Post
Pittsburgh, Cleveland and Philly are all on the upswing. Esp with all the new MAJOR construction projects going on in these cities. You have to visit to see this for youself, instead of the old negative stories you hear about these cities.

Now Detroit is a different story.
There's construction going on in Detroit, too.

If the regional economy improves, and their criminal mayor doesn't stay in office, Detroit will most likely improve as well. It's already sort of starting with the Super Bowl in 2006 and quite a bit of downtown revitalization.
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