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Old 05-11-2008, 03:21 PM
 
Location: England
7 posts, read 10,911 times
Reputation: 10
Question England to America

I'm 17 at the minute, living in England,
as I have done all my life.
Currently in, what I think is the equivilant to an American High School.
Getting A-levels (aged 16 - 18/19 qualifications )

Been considering the possibilty of moving to the states for sometime now,
and was wondering if people here could give me some advice.

On things like;
Ideal places to move to.
Benifits of living in the States.
Down-sides of living in the States.
Pre-moving suggestions, like additional qualifications, state-side arrangement etc.
And any other ideas people may have.

I know I may be young compared to some people on here,
and this might not be often discussed,
but it is something Im passionate about.
That being I would appreciate suggestions and not critisism!

Thank you
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Old 05-11-2008, 03:28 PM
 
Location: Southeast Missouri
5,827 posts, read 11,015,250 times
Reputation: 3160
I'm not sure there's one ideal place for everybody. Some places, such as Southern California has warm weather most of the year, but it can be pricey to live there. Some prefer small towns, some like big cities. Typically big cities cost more than small towns.

I'm not really sure there's any more benefits to living here than in the U.K. I've heard Britain's more expensive to live in, but that may be a matter of opinion.

Same for downsides. It probably depends on certain cirumstances. But college isn't paid for buy the government here, unless you get a scholarship or grant (sometimes based on grades and sometimes based on income or race).

Before moving you'll need to go through all the legal steps necessary. Sorry I can't help you there.
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Old 05-11-2008, 03:32 PM
 
Location: England
7 posts, read 10,911 times
Reputation: 10
Thanks for the reply.
Really, Id be looking for somewhere realistic for an 18 - 20 year old to start up.
So somewhere not too big and busy, with affordable living costs for someone of that age, and an amount of work going so that I wouldn't struggle too much to find work.
Im not one of these kids who wants the world and all the money within,
I just feel that the States have more to offer than the UK!
So I wouldnt really mind what work the city/state is heavy on,
just something reasonable, you know?
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Old 05-11-2008, 03:38 PM
 
2,502 posts, read 5,592,394 times
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What about college? Are you planning to study while you're here? Some schools are better than others when it comes to giving aid to international students.
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Old 05-11-2008, 03:39 PM
 
Location: Southeast Missouri
5,827 posts, read 11,015,250 times
Reputation: 3160
Here's a pounds to dollars and vise versa calculator
Dollars 2 Pounds

That's still pretty broad. The U.S. is big, so other than someone just giving you wild suggestions, some details might be nice:
1) Are you going to college?
2) what kind of job would you be looking for (or at least what type of job)
3) what's your budget for an apartment? What would you realistically like to pay? (try using the converter I linked to to convert pounds to dollars, that would help).
4) What kind of climate do you want? (warm all year, chilly most of the year with harsher winters, or seasonal (cold in winter, hot in summer))
5) size of the city?

Even if you can give a general idea on those it would help narrow it down. Otherwise people will just wildly throw out suggestions.

Thanks.

Try this little quiz that might help also:
Best Places to Live: Compare the Best Cities & Small Towns for You! (broken link)

Once you choose a place, try craigslist classifieds: jobs, housing, personals, for sale, services, community, events, forums for apartments

An apartment might be similar to a flat in London. Condos and Lofts are also sometimes for rent, sometimes for sale.
You'll also see condos and lofts, which are a little different.

Last edited by STLCardsBlues1989; 05-11-2008 at 03:48 PM..
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Old 05-11-2008, 03:48 PM
 
Location: England
7 posts, read 10,911 times
Reputation: 10
Thanks again to both of you.

radraja; Im studying for whatever Americans study for until they're 18/19
and as for University, for a degree, Im not sure but I doubt Id do that in either country. infact it's questionable as to whether I'll see my final year of A-levels. I know education isn't free stateside so would consider that in more depth after researching how realistic this idea actually is!

STL; I've adressed the education question above. As for what kind of job I would be interested in, I dont have an ideal job as such, so just something with decent pay; something in Retail or Manufacturing wouldn't be bad, or being a Clerk, Im really not too concerned on what career path I take. My Budget would be job dependant, so that isnt really answerable - What is the minimum wage stateside for whatever ages it changes at? Climatewise, something seasonal would be prefered, maybe a coastal region, that being the case, more warmth but still seasonal would be nice. As for size of the city, nothing large like NY or LA, something less Commercial.
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Old 05-11-2008, 03:52 PM
 
2,502 posts, read 5,592,394 times
Reputation: 807
Well, if you're looking for somplace inexpensive, but with moderate temperatures (leaning more on the warm side), I'd say to look at Tennessee, Kentucky, and North Carolina.
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Old 05-11-2008, 03:58 PM
 
Location: England
7 posts, read 10,911 times
Reputation: 10
I've just read up on someone else looking for a certain kind of US city and realised a few things Id want the city I moved to to have.

Accessable amenities; good transport links, local resaraunts, good facilities for kids etc.
Diverse culture
Good public school, or at least ones that aren't bad!
Good sence of community and safety.

Ideally, somewhere in the suburbs would be nice, but a few years down the line perhaps.
As for now, something in a reasonable sized city where accomidation and place of work would be within easy walking distance.

Would you say any of those 3 of that, Rad?
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Old 05-11-2008, 03:59 PM
 
Location: Southeast Missouri
5,827 posts, read 11,015,250 times
Reputation: 3160
18-year-olds are usually in their 4th (senior) year of High School (12th grade). You need a high school diploma to get any kind of decent job. Public high schools are paid for through taxes, but college is not paid for unless you get some kind of grant or scholarship.

I think minimum wage here (in Missouri) is $6.65 (someone correct me if I'm wrong) per hour, which is apparently about [SIZE=4][/SIZE]3.34
DOL WHD: Minimum Wage Laws in the States Try that map. Click a state and it'll tell you minimum wage.
California, for example, has $8.00/hour minimum wage, but Southern California is very expensive comparitively.
New York is $7.15, but it also pretty expensive. But if the employer offers you health insurance, some states give that employer the right to pay you less per hour (though they have to tell you).
Waiters and waitresses usually make less than minimum wage, but they get tips (money customers leave in response to good service). Tips are usually 15-20% in restaurants, depending on the quality of it.
Minimum wage varies by state, and be kind of confusing. So, others could probably answer questions better than I could.

I'm 18 myself. I just graduated High school. I'm about to go to college. The college costs about $1500 per semester ($3000/year), I think, but I got a scholarship paying for it. Most colleges will cost more than that, especially good colleges.

Good luck!
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Old 05-11-2008, 04:05 PM
 
Location: England
7 posts, read 10,911 times
Reputation: 10
I suppose to not continue until Im 18/19 would make me a High SChool drop-out in America.
Its different here is all, as our Mandatory education ends at 16,
and half the students drop out around this time, on average.
Im studying Maths Physics Chemistry and Biology at the minute,
and its customary to drop one subject for next year; mine being Chemistry.

On your own experience, what kind of position would this leave me in?
In your opinion if you have no solid idea
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