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Old 06-03-2008, 08:31 PM
 
2,039 posts, read 5,780,205 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Katiana View Post
I grew up in a suburb of a city of 14,000 people. The suburban area was almost as large, in population, as the city, and larger in land area. My suburb had its own government, etc separate from the city. That, to me, is what defines a suburb. It wasn't just a town near the core city, either. We did most of our shopping, business, and so on in the city, and that is where everyone went to high school at the time. The city was, in turn, a suburb of Pittsburgh.
I think it's hard to define "suburb." I agree 100% with Katiana about the suburb having it's own form of government (Town Hall, Court system, jail, tax base, schools, etc.)

The difference I've seen lately (from what Kat described) is that many suburbs have their own school system, and their own shopping centers now. At least that is the way it is for most of the suburbs I've lived in.

Lately I've run into areas that people consider suburban, but which I feel are between suburban and rural. Like the big McMansions on the one or two acre lots, with long winding roads, no sidewalks and basically one shopping center.

How does everyone else here describe suburban? I'm just curious.
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Old 06-03-2008, 08:33 PM
 
2,039 posts, read 5,780,205 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jjbradleynyc View Post
An interesting thread would be "which cities' suburbs have grown more prominent and larger than the city itself?"
Is this the case that anyone can think of? I was thinking Mesa, AZ in pure population is rising rapidly--certainly not getting anywhere close to Phoenix population, but has just about become the state's 2nd largest city, passing Tucson. Any others?? I can't think of any...maybe there aren't any...lol
I live in Scottsdale, Arizona and it is a separate city yet is considered by many to be a suburb of Phoenix. Go figure....

Last edited by londonbarcelona; 06-03-2008 at 08:33 PM.. Reason: spelling
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Old 06-03-2008, 09:41 PM
 
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Default Some More Thoughts

Quote:
Originally Posted by londonbarcelona View Post
I live in Scottsdale, Arizona and it is a separate city yet is considered by many to be a suburb of Phoenix. Go figure....
The "suburbs" of Phoenix (and maybe LA and SF and a few other big, Western cities) are an animal all their own. They've gotten to be so big that they're bigger than a lot of central cities back east. But they're still suburbs, I believe, because they piggybacked off of Phoenix's growth and still retain a common identity with the Phoenix region. That's even despite the fact that now many of the bigger Phoenix suburbs could indeed exist on their own now, unlike many of the suburbs of cities in the Northeast and Midwest.

An interesting phenomenon in relation to this discussion, and the most extreme one that comes to mind for me, would be Youngstown, Ohio, a city of about 80,000 residents (three times smaller than Scottsdale). Yet few would argue that Youngstown has its own set of suburbs (like Boardman, Poland, and Canfield, to name a few). Youngstown used to be much larger and has been bleeding residents for years. But the central city is still the most influential in the region and many residents of the Mahoning Valley still identify with it. No matter how much smaller the population within the actual city limits of Youngstown gets over the next few decades, I'd have a hard time believing that it won't still be considered the primary city of the metropolitan area.

This is a very interesting discussion and it's clear that a lot of times it's very subjective based on where you're from and what you're used to.
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Old 06-06-2008, 08:15 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by f1000 View Post
I would still say that Ft. Worth is a suburb, and more people than not, would say the same thing.
I guess I'm just an ignorant out of towner...I can't possibly understand why Dallas/FW residents go to such great lengths to make a distinction between Dallas & FT. Worth. When I look on a map it seems as though Fort Worth is practically West Dallas. There doesnt even seem to be much of a break in the urban density between the two cities...I mean its not like the San Antonio/Austin relationship where the areas are an hour or more apart from each other...Traveling from Dallas to Fort Worth is literally like traveling from one side of town to the other...

Oh well, I'm not from there so I don't have much of a say so anyway...but its just hard for me, as an outsider, to comprehend. But if Dallas/Ft. Worth residents have that understanding then who am I...
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Old 06-06-2008, 10:09 PM
Status: "Summer!" (set 22 days ago)
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
87,014 posts, read 102,621,396 times
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I lived in a "Twin Cities" place like that for several years (Champaign-Urbana, ILL). To an outsider, it certainly does look like you are just going from one part of town to another, plus the two downtowns. But there are historical differences which you understand better after you've lived there a while. I suspect it's like that in DFW as well. I think that both points of view are valid. Sometimes people in one city seem to put too much emphasis on the differences in the two, rather than the similarities. And outsiders don't always understand the history and why there are two instead of one.
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Old 06-07-2008, 06:58 AM
 
Location: Pittsburgh, USA
3,133 posts, read 8,337,157 times
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Pittsburgh has 3 cities in it's suburbs. Is Kansas City a suburb of Kansas City?
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Old 06-07-2008, 08:22 AM
Status: "Summer!" (set 22 days ago)
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
87,014 posts, read 102,621,396 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by PeterRabbit View Post
Pittsburgh has 3 cities in it's suburbs. Is Kansas City a suburb of Kansas City?
Most western cities' suburbs are cities as well. Almost all of Denver's suburbs are cities. The (suburban) city of Aurora is the third largest city in Colorado. The point is a suburb is a separate entitiy with its own government and schools.
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