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Old 06-03-2008, 01:02 AM
 
Location: Chicagoland
4,028 posts, read 6,398,515 times
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I was wondering if there was an unwritten number of people that a city must have to be considered a suburb? I've heard of suburbs in Wyoming but it's biggest city hardly exceeds 50,000 people and other areas a city of 100,000 might not have any itself. I was hoping someone would have some insight to this.
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Old 06-03-2008, 01:40 AM
 
Location: SF Bay Area
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I don't think there is some actual number or size a city has to be for it to have suburbs. It just needs an "urban" area that is distinct and different than the surrounding suburban communities and cities in a way. You need an "urban" or somewhat city like area then have lower density communities surrounding it for a place to have urban and suburban elements. Suburbs can also be within the main city like they are in Los Angeles, San Diego, and other large cities. It's not really population that determines whether a place is suburban or urban but more so the type of development, land use, density, etc..that is there. That's how I look at suburbs but some people consider them any nearby community/town/city outside of the largest city in the area.
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Old 06-03-2008, 02:54 AM
 
Location: San Diego
939 posts, read 2,830,180 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sav858 View Post
I don't think there is some actual number or size a city has to be for it to have suburbs. It just needs an "urban" area that is distinct and different than the surrounding suburban communities and cities in a way. You need an "urban" or somewhat city like area then have lower density communities surrounding it for a place to have urban and suburban elements. Suburbs can also be within the main city like they are in Los Angeles, San Diego, and other large cities. It's not really population that determines whether a place is suburban or urban but more so the type of development, land use, density, etc..that is there. That's how I look at suburbs but some people consider them any nearby community/town/city outside of the largest city in the area.
it can't be said any better then this. close the thread!
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Old 06-03-2008, 04:50 AM
 
Location: Youngstown, Oh.
4,896 posts, read 7,659,080 times
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I agree with the above.

But, there are people who say that everything surrounding the most populated city in a metropolitan area (with the obvious exception of completely undeveloped areas) is a suburb of that largest city.
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Old 06-03-2008, 05:52 AM
 
Location: AZ
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Duluth, MN is a city of around 85,000 I believe. We have some "suburbs", if you'd like to call them that. Proctor and Hermantown, namely.
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Old 06-03-2008, 07:29 AM
 
Location: East Tennessee and Atlanta
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An interesting thread would be "which cities' suburbs have grown more prominent and larger than the city itself?"
Is this the case that anyone can think of? I was thinking Mesa, AZ in pure population is rising rapidly--certainly not getting anywhere close to Phoenix population, but has just about become the state's 2nd largest city, passing Tucson. Any others?? I can't think of any...maybe there aren't any...lol
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Old 06-03-2008, 09:03 AM
 
Location: Center City Philadelphia
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Harrisburg (population 48,000) has very prominent suburbs. One of the suburbs, Lower Paxton Township, has a population that is projected to actually exceed the city in several years.
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Old 06-03-2008, 09:31 AM
 
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WaKeeney, KS which has around 1,900 people is apparently classified as a city by the State of Kansas. Suburban communities are Collyer with 133 people, Ogallah with 214 people and a couple of smaller places like Trego Center with just a handful of people.
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Old 06-03-2008, 11:40 AM
 
Location: Parker, CO
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When I think of suburbs, I think of communities surrounding mid to large sized cities. I think that sometimes people who live in smaller cities will describe the outlying communities as "suburbs" to make their cities sound larger.

It's funny to see comments like "the suburbs of Rapid City." I think that in these types of instances, the term "bedroom community" is more appropriate.
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Old 06-03-2008, 12:20 PM
 
11,172 posts, read 22,378,103 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by WILWRadio View Post
WaKeeney, KS which has around 1,900 people is apparently classified as a city by the State of Kansas. Suburban communities are Collyer with 133 people, Ogallah with 214 people and a couple of smaller places like Trego Center with just a handful of people.
I wouldn't really call these "suburbs".

WaKeeney is a town located along highway 40, and the other two are simply other small towns that are about 5 miles down the highway in each direction. This happens in thousands of places all across the country.

All three of these area are over 100 years old, and they're just your basic small rural towns that grew up near the railroad.
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