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Old 06-11-2008, 01:56 PM
 
Location: Chicagoland
4,028 posts, read 6,401,900 times
Reputation: 1305

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Quote:
Originally Posted by radraja View Post
Madrid and Tokyo are actually supposed to be in the lead for the 2016 Olympics. Those two had the highest bid scores. There's only a 1 in 4 chance that the Olympics will even come to the US.
3 out of the last 4 cities were in 3rd. Chicago can do it.

Quote:
Originally Posted by uglyblackjohn View Post
3-4 hours? Any drive over 2 hours requires a flight. 3-4 hours? That's the same drive as L.A. to Vegas.
2+ hours for a plane? That's wasteful and 3-4 hours to the ocean is pretty good considering how far away most of the country is.
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Old 06-11-2008, 02:33 PM
 
Location: St Simons Island, GA
23,127 posts, read 35,085,706 times
Reputation: 15338
Quote:
Originally Posted by GeminiGal View Post
Wow - another prime example hits the media today. Former Atlanta Mayor Bill Campbell (in prison for tax evasion) claims he is a champagne alcoholic, as he tries to get early release. He claimed on earlier accounts that he disliked the taste of alcohol, and only used the beverages to toast on special occasions.
LOL, God love Mayor Bill...guess he'll be OK as long as he sticks to beer or hard liquor.
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Old 06-11-2008, 03:08 PM
 
2,502 posts, read 8,052,913 times
Reputation: 885
The southwest is building desalination plants soon. And even without them, there's enough water to last many centuries.
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Old 06-11-2008, 08:32 PM
 
Location: from houstoner to bostoner to new yorker to new jerseyite ;)
4,085 posts, read 11,458,358 times
Reputation: 1947
Quote:
Originally Posted by SEAandATL View Post
What cities do you think have potential to have the brightest future? I would actually pick Atlanta. Many on this board have mentioned that Atlanta will become the next Detroit, but I actually think its going to get better in the long run. There are many new developments being built such as the Midtown Mile and Streets of Buckhead, and the Beltine project is currently in the process. It just needs to expand the public transit more.

Chicago is another city that has had many achievements recently, and could continue to improve in the next decade, especially if they host the 2016 Olympics. Seattle is another city where the future looks good, and maybe Portland and Denver.
Doesn't Portland need some jobs first before it can be added to this list?
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Old 06-11-2008, 08:48 PM
 
Location: Los Angeles-213.323.310.818/San Diego-619.858.760
705 posts, read 3,048,362 times
Reputation: 443
Quote:
Originally Posted by jjbradleynyc View Post
Also, the sprawl and traffic are still terrible. LA should start building a much more extensive subway system and encourage useage.
L.A. has the best freeway system and the best metro bus system in the nation. As far as 'rail', there are currently two new lines being constructed from downtown to East L.A. and the Expo line. The extension of the purple line is also in planning. In 1993, the city of L.A. had no rail, and now 15 years later it has the Red Line, Blue Line, Purple line, Gold Line and its adding two other lines soon. With L.A. live being built, Broadway being revitalized, and the 'Grand' Project being completed, downtown L.A. will have a new image. If you visited Los Angeles a couple months ago, you have to visit it again because it has changed quite a bit. I'm amazed at how quickly the city is changing with new retail and high rises being biult.
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Old 06-11-2008, 09:40 PM
 
Location: The Powerhouse That Is California
145 posts, read 465,828 times
Reputation: 68
Los Angeles
San Francisco
San Jose
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Old 06-12-2008, 12:38 AM
 
58 posts, read 182,050 times
Reputation: 44
According to fDi Magazine, this is the top ten North American cities of the future:

1. Chicago
2. Toronto
3. Pittsburgh
4. Atlanta
5. Guadalajara
6. Baltimore
7. Montreal
8. Mexico City
9. Boston
10. Miami


The factors considered:

Best economic potential
Most cost effective
Best human resources
Best quality of life
Best infrastructure
Most business friendly
Best FDI promotion

Here's the link: North American Cities of the Future - 2007 fDi magazine award
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Old 06-12-2008, 12:45 AM
 
58 posts, read 182,050 times
Reputation: 44
Quote:
Originally Posted by radraja View Post
Madrid and Tokyo are actually supposed to be in the lead for the 2016 Olympics. Those two had the highest bid scores. There's only a 1 in 4 chance that the Olympics will even come to the US.
I believe London was 3rd as well in the bid scores for 2012.
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Old 06-12-2008, 12:47 AM
 
5 posts, read 7,969 times
Reputation: 10
gotta be better than orlando. Not even disney is hiring
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Old 06-12-2008, 09:33 AM
 
28,905 posts, read 46,767,657 times
Reputation: 46039
Pretty much any mid-sized Southeastern metro area at this point: Charlotte, Jacksonville, Birmingham, Nashville, Chattanooga, Virginia Beach/Norfolk, Mobile, and Baton Rouge. Typically, economic growth is a point or two ahead of the rest of the country, and unemployment is typically a point or two under.

Oddly enough, I'm lukewarm on Atlanta's prospects, chiefly because the city really has to change a great deal of its infrastructure to catch up to its metastasizing growth of the past. The water shortages in Atlanta are beginning to put a chokehold on development. What's more, Alabama and Florida are taking Georgia to Federal court over the excessive water usage of the Chattahoochee by Georgians. If the Federal courts intervene in Alabama and Florida's favor, then that could bring Atlanta's growth to a screeching halt.

Elsewhere in the South, water just isn't a problem. But Atlanta's dependence on Lake Lanier is forcing the city to reach a critical point in deciding where it needs to go as a city. While I certainly don't rule out growth for Atlanta, I think the city really has to deal with these obstacles to continue the same growth trends of the past 30 years.
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