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Old 06-11-2008, 08:17 AM
 
Location: Boston Metrowest (via the Philly area)
4,460 posts, read 7,526,734 times
Reputation: 4352

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I'm surprised no one has posted a thread on this very important topic yet. I'm seeing more and more articles about increased mass transit ridership. This article on MSNBC.com claims that ridership on mass transit is now as high as it was 50 years ago:

Jammed transit systems running on fumes - Consumer news - MSNBC.com

Will this trend begin to significantly alter the kind of autocentric growth we continue to see in the Sun Belt -- also causing more people to move to areas where mass transit is more accessible? Will the federal government finally put more funding priority into further developing mass transit systems (i.e., Maglev, etc.)? What do others think?
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Old 06-11-2008, 09:18 AM
Status: "Nobody's right if everybody's wrong" (set 29 days ago)
 
Location: New Albany, Indiana (Greater Louisville)
9,843 posts, read 21,147,636 times
Reputation: 9420
Commuting for less | courier-journal | The Courier-Journal
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Old 06-11-2008, 09:27 AM
 
Location: Hell's Kitchen, NYC
2,271 posts, read 4,531,043 times
Reputation: 1594
I think its more important what this means for "America's towns and cities" The people who live a gazillion miles from their jobs and don't have any public transportation still have to keep buying. As the article above stated, the country as a whole is autocentric. Some people will have easier alternatives, such as moving closer into town, but some people can't afford options like that right off, or don't want to for a lot of other reasons.

Last edited by theSUBlime; 06-11-2008 at 09:40 AM..
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Old 06-11-2008, 10:53 AM
 
1,992 posts, read 6,035,933 times
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I think these high gas prices are a blessing in disguise. If you look at most other civilized countries in the world, you will find extensive public transportation systems. The U.S. is not in line with the rest of the world as far as our rail infrastructure, it's almost inconcievable how we have fallen so far behind. I think many people have a negative perception of public transportation, even though they may have never left their cars before. The pressure from high gas prices will force many people to give it a try, which should dispel some stereotypes and negative perceptions that has held back funding.
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Old 06-11-2008, 10:58 AM
 
5,728 posts, read 9,092,123 times
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How does trading your freedom to travel as you please a blessing in disguise?

Fortunately battery powered electric vehicles are starting to develop into viable options now that batteries capable of running in excess of 200 miles between charges are just on the horizon.
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Old 06-11-2008, 11:42 AM
 
1,992 posts, read 6,035,933 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by WILWRadio View Post
How does trading your freedom to travel as you please a blessing in disguise?

Fortunately battery powered electric vehicles are starting to develop into viable options now that batteries capable of running in excess of 200 miles between charges are just on the horizon.
While your statement is somewhat of a straw-man and is intellectually dishonest, we are going to have to give up a little freedom when we switch over to a sustainable mode of transportation. A car is NOT a birth right. That kind of attitude exudes a sense of selfish entitlement. While I would welcome electric cars, I am skeptical. We have been promised the technology since the 80's, and it seems that the engineers encounter seemingly endless technical hurdles that have so far prevented a viable electric car from materializing.
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Old 06-11-2008, 12:15 PM
 
Location: SF Bay Area
15,470 posts, read 25,425,564 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by WILWRadio View Post
How does trading your freedom to travel as you please a blessing in disguise?

Fortunately battery powered electric vehicles are starting to develop into viable options now that batteries capable of running in excess of 200 miles between charges are just on the horizon.
What freedom do I have sitting in bumper to bumper traffic and being forced to buy expensive gasoline b/c I have no alternatives?

Freedom is being able to take public transit instead of sitting in traffic or paying high gas prices. It's about options, if you don't want to take public transit then that's fine, but I and a lot of other people would like to when it's done right.
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Old 06-11-2008, 12:32 PM
 
5,728 posts, read 9,092,123 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by toughguy View Post
While your statement is somewhat of a straw-man and is intellectually dishonest, we are going to have to give up a little freedom when we switch over to a sustainable mode of transportation. A car is NOT a birth right. That kind of attitude exudes a sense of selfish entitlement. While I would welcome electric cars, I am skeptical. We have been promised the technology since the 80's, and it seems that the engineers encounter seemingly endless technical hurdles that have so far prevented a viable electric car from materializing.
Well, I don't want to deprive you and others from your birthright to use government subsidized mass transit. Use it to your hearts content. If you want to give up a little of your freedom to move freely then by all means do so. Just don't expect all of us to follow suit.

Links to some hybrids and electric vehicles on the horizon. We're headed in the right direction.

AFS Trinity Power – A revolution in Fast Energy Storage™ featuring the Extreme Hybrid™.

Tesla Motors Pricey right now.

The Top Ten electric vehicles you can buy right now (for the most part) - AutoblogGreen

Homebuilt "Evette" electric car gets 200 miles per charge - Engadget
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