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Old 06-21-2010, 03:30 PM
 
Location: McKeesport
4,542 posts, read 7,443,723 times
Reputation: 3430

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It may help if we organized the rust belt cities into categories. Certainly, some rust belt cities are doing very well and are quite vibrant, while others are abandoned and crumbling.

The Dead and Dying Rust-Belt Cities:

Detroit, Flint, Youngstown, Jackson (MI), Lansing, Battle Creek

Barely Hanging On:

Cleveland, Buffalo, Binghamton, Scranton, Wheeling (WV), Toledo, Dayton, Fort Wayne, Erie, Akron.

Stable or Recovering:

St. Louis, Milwaukee, Cincinnatti, Grand Rapids,

Vibrant:

Indianapolis, Columbus, Chicago, Pittsburgh (one in every state, actually)

Feel free to add or make changes to my list.
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Old 06-21-2010, 03:48 PM
 
Location: Chicago, IL
1,954 posts, read 4,506,779 times
Reputation: 1817
Quote:
Originally Posted by alleghenyangel View Post
It may help if we organized the rust belt cities into categories. Certainly, some rust belt cities are doing very well and are quite vibrant, while others are abandoned and crumbling.

The Dead and Dying Rust-Belt Cities:

Detroit, Flint, Youngstown, Jackson (MI), Lansing, Battle Creek

Barely Hanging On:

Cleveland, Buffalo, Binghamton, Scranton, Wheeling (WV), Toledo, Dayton, Fort Wayne, Erie, Akron.

Stable or Recovering:

St. Louis, Milwaukee, Cincinnatti, Grand Rapids,

Vibrant:

Indianapolis, Columbus, Chicago, Pittsburgh (one in every state, actually)

Feel free to add or make changes to my list.
I'm not sure any rust belt city is truly "dead" (well, maybe Gary). Even Detroit and Youngstown are making improvements in some areas. For example the areas around Wayne State and downtown Youngstown are better off than they were a decade ago.

I don't think Cleveland or Akron are any worse off than St. Louis or Cincinnati (although I'm sure a Pittsburgh resident would like to think so LOL). Cleveland, not Columbus, actually has the lowest unemployment rate in Ohio at this point. Cleveland also has a pretty decent downtown, which I would even say is more happening than Pittsburgh's. Can't say the same about neighborhoods though.

Columbus and Indianapolis were never rust belt to begin with and I certainly would not consider either of them particularly vibrant compared to other similar sized cites.
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Old 06-21-2010, 05:11 PM
 
Location: McKeesport
4,542 posts, read 7,443,723 times
Reputation: 3430
Detroit is definitely dead.
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Old 06-22-2010, 05:54 AM
 
Location: The Lakes
2,372 posts, read 4,452,740 times
Reputation: 1136
Yup, Detroit is dead, gone, buried. Never mind the existence of thousands in upscale enclaves like Indian Village, Boston-Edison, and the many neighborhoods downtown. Never mind that thriving metro of 5-6 million that puts to shame almost every other in terms of AVERAGE safety and affordability. Never mind the extremely MASSIVE amount of cultural opportunities.

Yup. This city is dead:


http://www.gmrencen.com/Portals/0/images/riverwalk_carousel_large.jpg (broken link)


This **** hole, with its thriving farmers market (Eastern Market) making fresh produce available in a city where regular grocery stores have taken second fiddle to such open-air establishments, at an extremely low price, is dead. This rusty, crusty **** hole will NEVER provide anything with some of the largest art museums as well as one of the largest chunks of the US manufacturing base, period. Detroit sucks. Period. Detroit is dead. Final.

P.S., leave the freeway sometime, it's good for ya.
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Old 06-22-2010, 06:00 AM
 
Location: Kenmore, WA
7,492 posts, read 6,478,598 times
Reputation: 10927
The rust belt (along with the woodlands) will rebound when its citizens decide the past isn't coming back, and get job skills that invest in the future. For some reason, we cannot seem to cope with the idea that our resources are not a ticket for prosperity -- its our minds.
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Old 06-22-2010, 08:51 PM
 
1,250 posts, read 2,118,025 times
Reputation: 279
Quote:
Originally Posted by alleghenyangel View Post
It may help if we organized the rust belt cities into categories. Certainly, some rust belt cities are doing very well and are quite vibrant, while others are abandoned and crumbling.

The Dead and Dying Rust-Belt Cities:

Detroit, Flint, Youngstown, Jackson (MI), Lansing, Battle Creek

Barely Hanging On:

Cleveland, Buffalo, Binghamton, Scranton, Wheeling (WV), Toledo, Dayton, Fort Wayne, Erie, Akron.

Stable or Recovering:

St. Louis, Milwaukee, Cincinnatti, Grand Rapids,

Vibrant:

Indianapolis, Columbus, Chicago, Pittsburgh (one in every state, actually)

Feel free to add or make changes to my list.
I am wondering, is this list composed of core cities or metro areas as a whole? This could be relevant due to core cities not all being equal due to size and other physical constraints. It is interesting that the first two categories nearly form a geographic bullseye. I also wonder if the progress in terms of transitioning is partly based on when they had to consider it since depending on makeup of cities the need to change my of come earlier or later.
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Old 12-12-2010, 11:59 AM
 
238 posts, read 254,228 times
Reputation: 262
just wait till the next big war.
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Old 12-12-2010, 01:58 PM
 
Location: Cleveland, Ohio
1,372 posts, read 2,795,045 times
Reputation: 839
Cleveland has already "turned the corner" from this latest recession ... there's a very strong momentum of revitalization that is beginning to transform Cleveland once again into a destination city for a whole new generation of "new and former residents"


The building boom that is reshaping key portions of the city is both inspiring and is also visually captivating ...


It's an exciting time to be in Cleveland, and the city was just ranked 10th of 50 other major American cities in terms of "economic recovery and strength" ( 49th globally out of 150 cities total )



http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mTBWCgtoWCo


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QgwVM...eature=related

Greater Cleveland's recovery ranks in top of U.S. metro areas, study says | cleveland.com
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Old 12-12-2010, 02:18 PM
 
Location: Detroit's eastside, downtown Detroit in near future!
2,055 posts, read 3,810,263 times
Reputation: 655
Quote:
Originally Posted by alleghenyangel View Post
Detroit is definitely dead.
why don't you do some research before you talk ****. Detroit dead? never that. over 900,000 people still live here, big three making a comeback, still have plenty of affluent neighborhoods, people still have jobs here, companies continuing to move their headquaters downtown, plenty of projects completed, going on as we speak and will soon start. No offense to youngstown but putting Detroit in the same category is ridiculous. I swear the **** stupid people who obviously never been here will say
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Old 12-12-2010, 02:21 PM
 
Location: Detroit's eastside, downtown Detroit in near future!
2,055 posts, read 3,810,263 times
Reputation: 655
Quote:
Originally Posted by UKUKUK View Post
Yup, Detroit is dead, gone, buried. Never mind the existence of thousands in upscale enclaves like Indian Village, Boston-Edison, and the many neighborhoods downtown. Never mind that thriving metro of 5-6 million that puts to shame almost every other in terms of AVERAGE safety and affordability. Never mind the extremely MASSIVE amount of cultural opportunities.

Yup. This city is dead:





This **** hole, with its thriving farmers market (Eastern Market) making fresh produce available in a city where regular grocery stores have taken second fiddle to such open-air establishments, at an extremely low price, is dead. This rusty, crusty **** hole will NEVER provide anything with some of the largest art museums as well as one of the largest chunks of the US manufacturing base, period. Detroit sucks. Period. Detroit is dead. Final.

P.S., leave the freeway sometime, it's good for ya.
Thank you UKUKUK!
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