U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > General U.S.
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
 
Old 06-08-2012, 08:58 PM
Status: "LILY DALE!" (set 2 days ago)
 
Location: The New England part of Ohio
18,678 posts, read 23,299,713 times
Reputation: 48877

Advertisements

Quote:
Originally Posted by UKUKUK View Post
A lot of us are open to change, but in a different direction. We don't want to become "hip" liberal strongholds with cookie cutter subdivisions. A lot of us pride ourselves on our strong working-man history. My family goes back 5 generations in both directions as either being high ranking military officers or working in factories. I certainly would hate to see such a rich city in history as Detroit invaded by the same sort who have invaded Denver, Austin, Atlanta, etc.
I have no desire to live in some bland, heartless, homogenized spread out "burb with no soul. Where an "older home" was built in 1975.

The rust belt is rebounding NOW.

Where I would disagree with this poster would be in who has invaded those Rocky Mtn and Sunbelt cities, and who will revive the Rust Belt.

They are young, well educated, and centrist or liberal. Sorry, but that's what the demographics say.

They are people who appreciate art and architecture, and no, I'm not taking plastic sided Victorians or Thomas Kinkaids.

The cities that are doing the best are the ones who are the most open minded and are not scaring off the new people.

Like it or not it appears our country is dividing along red and blue. Red is staying in the stultifying suburbs, while blue is seeking out more well worn, and rusty pastures.

It makes sense. We are the ones who recycle, ride bikes to work, purchase mini coopers and are not afraid to enter a thrift store.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 06-08-2012, 09:18 PM
Status: "LILY DALE!" (set 2 days ago)
 
Location: The New England part of Ohio
18,678 posts, read 23,299,713 times
Reputation: 48877
Quote:
Originally Posted by alleghenyangel View Post
It may help if we organized the rust belt cities into categories. Certainly, some rust belt cities are doing very well and are quite vibrant, while others are abandoned and crumbling.

The Dead and Dying Rust-Belt Cities:

Detroit, Flint, Youngstown, Jackson (MI), Lansing, Battle Creek

Barely Hanging On:

Cleveland, Buffalo, Binghamton, Scranton, Wheeling (WV), Toledo, Dayton, Fort Wayne, Erie, Akron.

Stable or Recovering:

St. Louis, Milwaukee, Cincinnatti, Grand Rapids,

Vibrant:

Indianapolis, Columbus, Chicago, Pittsburgh (one in every state, actually)

Feel free to add or make changes to my list.

Disagree about Youngstown, Cleveland, Akron, Binghamton, Erie, Dayton and some others.

Places with large vibrant universities bring in new blood. Sometimes that new blood stays.

There are several initiatives in Youngstown right now to refurbish and purchase some beautiful 1920s homes, and economic incentives for businesses.

I also think that people are beginning to wonder about sustainability. I mean were we really meant to live in the middle of deserts where water needs to be practically imported?

Is it that bad to have three cold months? Or is it the norm to live in a place where the A/C needs to run 24/7 - 365?

Do we need to build crap houses with Chinese drywall, that last 30 years at most? Or could we refurbish, restore and renew what we have?

Many Americans are getting sick of this through away society.
I am one.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-08-2012, 09:25 PM
Status: "LILY DALE!" (set 2 days ago)
 
Location: The New England part of Ohio
18,678 posts, read 23,299,713 times
Reputation: 48877
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gnutella View Post
Because taxes aren't the be-all-end-all for quality of life. Sure, any way that governments can get more out of their tax money is a good thing, but if it was as simple as "high rates = bad" and "low rates = good," then why does Massachusetts have a higher quality of life than Mississippi?
What a GREAT POINT! Massachusetts - lowest divorce rate in the nation.

Sun and Bible Belts - in the top 15! Is everything perfect in Family Value Land?

Taxes can give you good schools and a quality lifestyle. They are not the only indices of "quality of life."
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-08-2012, 09:39 PM
 
Location: Cleveland bound with MPLS in the rear-view
5,530 posts, read 10,153,823 times
Reputation: 2384
Quote:
Originally Posted by sheena12 View Post
Disagree about Youngstown, Cleveland, Akron, Binghamton, Erie, Dayton and some others.

Places with large vibrant universities bring in new blood. Sometimes that new blood stays.

There are several initiatives in Youngstown right now to refurbish and purchase some beautiful 1920s homes, and economic incentives for businesses.

I also think that people are beginning to wonder about sustainability. I mean were we really meant to live in the middle of deserts where water needs to be practically imported?

Is it that bad to have three cold months? Or is it the norm to live in a place where the A/C needs to run 24/7 - 365?

Do we need to build crap houses with Chinese drywall, that last 30 years at most? Or could we refurbish, restore and renew what we have?

Many Americans are getting sick of this through away society.
I am one.
Amen Sheena! And your name rhymes with my wife's!!
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-08-2012, 09:49 PM
Status: "LILY DALE!" (set 2 days ago)
 
Location: The New England part of Ohio
18,678 posts, read 23,299,713 times
Reputation: 48877
Quote:
Originally Posted by west336 View Post
Amen Sheena! And your name rhymes with my wife's!!
She must have a beautiful name!

And a smart DH!
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-08-2012, 11:50 PM
 
Location: Cleveland bound with MPLS in the rear-view
5,530 posts, read 10,153,823 times
Reputation: 2384
Quote:
Originally Posted by sheena12 View Post
She must have a beautiful name!

And a smart DH!
k, what the hell is "DH"? Designated husband?
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-09-2012, 09:10 AM
 
5,556 posts, read 6,997,662 times
Reputation: 2807
Quote:
Originally Posted by Akhenaton06 View Post
Firstly, all of the cities on that list aren't conservative, Atlanta and Houston most notably. Secondly, I don't know of any lists where cities like Mobile, Jackson, Birmingham, etc. are "way up there" on these lists you speak of. They certainly aren't rapidly-growing places.

The city of Detroit is not conservative and it is certainly not "way up there". What's your point?
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-09-2012, 09:16 AM
 
5,556 posts, read 6,997,662 times
Reputation: 2807
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gnutella View Post
Because taxes aren't the be-all-end-all for quality of life. Sure, any way that governments can get more out of their tax money is a good thing, but if it was as simple as "high rates = bad" and "low rates = good," then why does Massachusetts have a higher quality of life than Mississippi?

Come visit the city of Detroit - you will be shocked how high the taxes are vs. the city services received.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-09-2012, 09:18 AM
 
5,556 posts, read 6,997,662 times
Reputation: 2807
Quote:
Originally Posted by alleghenyangel View Post
It may help if we organized the rust belt cities into categories. Certainly, some rust belt cities are doing very well and are quite vibrant, while others are abandoned and crumbling.

The Dead and Dying Rust-Belt Cities:

Detroit, Flint, Youngstown, Jackson (MI), Lansing, Battle Creek

Barely Hanging On:

Cleveland, Buffalo, Binghamton, Scranton, Wheeling (WV), Toledo, Dayton, Fort Wayne, Erie, Akron.

Stable or Recovering:

St. Louis, Milwaukee, Cincinnatti, Grand Rapids,

Vibrant:

Indianapolis, Columbus, Chicago, Pittsburgh (one in every state, actually)

Feel free to add or make changes to my list.

Lansing? Lansing has the state capital and MSU.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-09-2012, 11:56 AM
 
Location: The canyon (with my pistols and knife)
13,227 posts, read 17,991,900 times
Reputation: 14678
Quote:
Originally Posted by ram2 View Post
Come visit the city of Detroit - you will be shocked how high the taxes are vs. the city services received.
It's probably the result of legacy costs, plus having to maintain infrastructure of a city that used to be twice as large. A lot of older cities with reduced populations face those problems.

On the other hand, Minneapolis and St. Paul have high taxes, but they seem to be run well. Then there's the state of Louisiana, which has low taxes but is not known to be run well, at least until recently.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > General U.S.
Similar Threads
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2019, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top