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Old 10-19-2017, 08:00 AM
 
56,766 posts, read 81,102,256 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TPetty View Post
You are certainly correct but I donít think Richmond is considered a Sun Belt city. The climate is not warm enough.
I believe it still qualifies, even if it isnít, there are still enough examples that makes the point I was trying to make.
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Old 10-19-2017, 01:22 PM
 
11,182 posts, read 22,403,520 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by North 42 View Post
Your knowledge of Detroit is severely lacking, despite your name, lol.Detroit is in the midst of a remarkable renaissance, with more building activity than it has seen in decades. DT is booming along with some of the other core neighbourhoods, and a new tallest tower is supposed to start construction this year in the city.
The population is stabilizing and some neighbourhoods are actually gaining many new residents. I figure it won't be long before the city as a whole starts gaining population once again.
yeah my in-laws are from Detroit - crazy amount of activity going on there, especially given what they've done the past few decades.

New arena, basically a new neighborhood there, new towers going up, new parks, a new transit line just opened. Downtown and the central core are doing great.

The suburbs have really propped back up again after going through their first rough patch ever from around 2008 to 2013.

In the past five years the Detroit area has created over 225,000 new jobs. They haven't done anything like that since the late 1990's.
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Old 10-19-2017, 01:25 PM
 
11,182 posts, read 22,403,520 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by QCongress83216 View Post
They won't call Baltimore, Boston and Philly the Rust Belt because their considered East Coast cities.
I think that's the problem. East Coast cities represents cities that fall in a physical area.

"Rust Belt" doesn't really have a set location. Are Madison, Columbus, Indianapolis, Chicago or Grand Rapids rust belt? What about Cincinnati or Fort Wayne? Their metro areas have always grown and are currently growing quite nicely. Kalamazoo? It's grown consistently too, over 1/3 since the 1970's. South Bend? It's not growing much, but the metro has never shrunk. Toledo, Ohio? Definitely rust belt qualities and areas, but it's population is still the same as it was in 1970 when the bottom fell out, it's not going away.

Really, the suburban areas (where everyone lives) of Cleveland and Detroit are also not rust belt, and that's most of the metro areas.

Rust Belt is a list of specific cities and neighborhoods, central areas of Cleveland, Detroit, south side of Chicago, Youngstown, Flint and Gary. They were old manufacturing bases that went belly up, but that isn't representative of the great lakes or the Midwest.

Last edited by Chicago60614; 10-19-2017 at 01:35 PM..
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Old 10-21-2017, 03:17 PM
 
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Originally Posted by TheLawMan View Post
Lol no it wouldn't.
Yet it still suffers from population erosion.
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Old 10-21-2017, 05:25 PM
 
56,766 posts, read 81,102,256 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TPetty View Post
Yet it still suffers from population erosion.
Some areas have and some haven't.
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Old 10-22-2017, 11:55 AM
 
Location: Cleveland, Ohio
1,372 posts, read 2,797,976 times
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Anybody saying that there's no hope of any rebound in Cleveland clearly has not been here in the past 5, or even the past 2 years.

The population losses have begun to level off and the city's central core now boasts the largest and still rapidly growing downtown district in the state of Ohio. There have been BILLIONS OF DOLLARS in new and re-purposed development throughout the city limits, but especially in the central core of the city.

Guess what? There's BILLIONS more in new construction and new development still coming down the pipeline, too. It seems like every other day there's some type of positive HEADLINE regarding Cleveland as it relates to business growth or new development ...

Here's just one of the latest examples:

Game changing bio-med center coming to Cleveland | cleveland.com
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Old 10-22-2017, 03:00 PM
 
387 posts, read 369,223 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ckhthankgod View Post
Some areas have and some haven't.
I was speaking for the city as a whole, not just certain parts. If you take the whole City of Pittsburgh into consideration, then it suffers from population erosion, therefore Pittsburgh is indeed one of those Rust Belt cities that is barely hanging on.
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Old 10-22-2017, 03:07 PM
 
387 posts, read 369,223 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JohnDBaumgardner View Post
Anybody saying that there's no hope of any rebound in Cleveland clearly has not been here in the past 5, or even the past 2 years.

The population losses have begun to level off and the city's central core now boasts the largest and still rapidly growing downtown district in the state of Ohio. There have been BILLIONS OF DOLLARS in new and re-purposed development throughout the city limits, but especially in the central core of the city.

Guess what? There's BILLIONS more in new construction and new development still coming down the pipeline, too. It seems like every other day there's some type of positive HEADLINE regarding Cleveland as it relates to business growth or new development ...

Here's just one of the latest examples:

Game changing bio-med center coming to Cleveland | cleveland.com
Yet that begs one question is the redevelopment going to benefit Clevelandís longtime working class population or will it just benefit middle and upper class residents. You see Cleveland was built to be a blue collar city, as was Detroit, Gary, Pittsburgh, Buffalo, and so many more cities in the Rust Belt. Ya know if we canít bring back heavy industries then we could maybe bring some light industries there like textile manufacturing. As you know not only have heavy industries left this country like steel and automobiles but light industries have left this country as well, such as textiles and plastics.
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Old 10-22-2017, 03:21 PM
 
387 posts, read 369,223 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by PreservationPioneer View Post
It may help if we organized the rust belt cities into categories. Certainly, some rust belt cities are doing very well and are quite vibrant, while others are abandoned and crumbling.

The Dead and Dying Rust-Belt Cities:

Detroit, Flint, Youngstown, Jackson (MI), Lansing, Battle Creek

Barely Hanging On:

Cleveland, Buffalo, Binghamton, Scranton, Wheeling (WV), Toledo, Dayton, Fort Wayne, Erie, Akron.

Stable or Recovering:

St. Louis, Milwaukee, Cincinnatti, Grand Rapids,

Vibrant:

Indianapolis, Columbus, Chicago, Pittsburgh (one in every state, actually)

Feel free to add or make changes to my list.
All of them are dying in some regard. You see if it wasnít for all the deindustrialization in the first place then every single Rust Belt city would be doing much better. For example if Detroit didnít shut down itís car factories, it would be doing much better, or if Pittsburgh and Gary didnít shut down its steel mills, it would be doing much better, or if Akron didnít shut down its tire factories, it would be doing much better, or if Muncie didnít shut down its glass factories, it would be doing much better. You obviously fail to realize that deindustrialization has destroyed the U.S. economy and now the economy is at its worst these days.
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Old 10-22-2017, 03:23 PM
 
Location: Cleveland, Ohio
1,372 posts, read 2,797,976 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TPetty View Post


Yet that begs one question is the redevelopment going to benefit Cleveland’s longtime working class population or will it just benefit middle and upper class residents. You see Cleveland was built to be a blue collar city, as was Detroit, Gary, Pittsburgh, Buffalo, and so many more cities in the Rust Belt. Ya know if we can’t bring back heavy industries then we could maybe bring some light industries there like textile manufacturing. As you know not only have heavy industries left this country like steel and automobiles but light industries have left this country as well, such as textiles and plastics.

This tremendous growth and the tsunami of new development is fantastic for the city of Cleveland, which in turn will benefit ALL of the citizens of Cleveland. It is re-strengthening and building the city's tax base allowing for improvements to publicly used parks, recreation centers, and best of all, it will lead to even more needed improvements for the Cleveland Metropolitan Schools.

This renaissance does not favor only the wealthy or the yuppies who are infiltrating the city proper, it is going to benefit every person in some form.

I returned home to Cleveland seven years ago, because I wanted to be a participant in this city's enormous
turnaround ... I have not regretted a single day ever since.
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