U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > General U.S.
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
 
Old 11-01-2017, 07:45 PM
 
Location: Cleveland, OH
1,234 posts, read 635,913 times
Reputation: 740

Advertisements

Quote:
Originally Posted by bjimmy24 View Post
A lot of the MSAs in these areas are still as large as they were a couple decades ago. If we could get these folks to abandon their cookie cutter suburbs and move back into the cities, things would look so much better, even if overall MSA population stayed the same. Or even if it declined a little. But the issue in places like Detroit and Cleveland is that many areas of the city are infected with crime and homes that would need major work.
I agree.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 11-01-2017, 07:47 PM
 
Location: Cleveland, OH
1,234 posts, read 635,913 times
Reputation: 740
Quote:
Originally Posted by mjlo View Post
Detroit's decline has less to do with decline in manufacturing, and more to do with white flight and political warfare with it's suburbs. It's a common misconception made by people who are not super familiar with the situation. If Detroit's losses were truly due to the decline of its signature industry, the surrounding region should have suffered mimicking losses and did not. Had Detroit not been walled off and economically choked by it's suburbs the conversation here would be very different. Detroit didn't "shut down" it's car making. Most of those jobs simply shifted to Detroit's suburbs. Over the last 50 years as manufacturing jobs shift south, and out of the country, the R&D, administrative, and corporate positions surrounding the automotive industry trippled. The bulk of those types of jobs are still located in suburban Detroit, and increasing moving back to Detroit itself.
I'm just curious. What's your take on Cleveland's situation?
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 11-01-2017, 08:47 PM
 
56,516 posts, read 80,824,285 times
Reputation: 12480
Quote:
Originally Posted by TPetty View Post
I was speaking for the city as a whole, not just certain parts. If you take the whole City of Pittsburgh into consideration, then it suffers from population erosion, therefore Pittsburgh is indeed one of those Rust Belt cities that is barely hanging on.
The problem with this is that it doesn’t take suburbanization and the lack off annexation into account. In many states that “Rust Belt” cities are in, the surrounding municipalities are incorporated versus cities that have annexed unincorporated communities/land in (relatively) recent years. So, many “Rust Belt” cities can’t benefit from annexation, which helps or helped population growth in cities in other regions.

This is why people use metro areas, as the criteria is at least the same, even if it isn’t perfect.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 11-01-2017, 10:02 PM
 
4,478 posts, read 2,661,399 times
Reputation: 4083
Single people living in houses seems pretty odd. Maybe it's common in townhouse cities. It's a bit unusual in my area which lacks the "missing middle" and is primarily fully-detached houses and apartments/condos.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 11-02-2017, 12:12 AM
 
Location: Atlanta
5,286 posts, read 3,503,555 times
Reputation: 4463
Quote:
Originally Posted by mhays25 View Post
Single people living in houses seems pretty odd. Maybe it's common in townhouse cities. It's a bit unusual in my area which lacks the "missing middle" and is primarily fully-detached houses and apartments/condos.
Seattle & the urban West Coast doesn't mirror the rest of the U.S. when it comes to this. Many people enjoy and can still afford 'elbow room' points East.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 11-02-2017, 02:55 AM
 
3,952 posts, read 3,487,388 times
Reputation: 6325
Quote:
Originally Posted by QCongress83216 View Post
I'm just curious. What's your take on Cleveland's situation?
Unfortunately i'm not familiar enough with Cleveland to say.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 11-02-2017, 03:29 AM
 
70 posts, read 32,701 times
Reputation: 106
As someone coming from and living in a rust-belt area of Europe, this is an interesting thread. Issues are similar.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 11-02-2017, 10:14 AM
 
Location: Cleveland, OH
1,234 posts, read 635,913 times
Reputation: 740
Quote:
Originally Posted by tchek View Post
As someone coming from and living in a rust-belt area of Europe, this is an interesting thread. Issues are similar.
How are they similar?
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 11-02-2017, 10:23 AM
 
70 posts, read 32,701 times
Reputation: 106
Quote:
Originally Posted by QCongress83216 View Post
How are they similar?
Rust-belt cities everywhere have a hard time recovering, lots of poverty, demographic flight and the difficulties of turning it around.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 11-02-2017, 01:25 PM
 
387 posts, read 368,151 times
Reputation: 294
Quote:
Originally Posted by ckhthankgod View Post
The problem with this is that it doesn’t take suburbanization and the lack off annexation into account. In many states that “Rust Belt” cities are in, the surrounding municipalities are incorporated versus cities that have annexed unincorporated communities/land in (relatively) recent years. So, many “Rust Belt” cities can’t benefit from annexation, which helps or helped population growth in cities in other regions.

This is why people use metro areas, as the criteria is at least the same, even if it isn’t perfect.
Actually in case you haven’t noticed the metro areas of many Rust Belt cities are declining as well, including Detroit, Cleveland, Buffalo, Pittsburgh, and so on. It’s not just the city propers.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > General U.S.
Similar Threads
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

© 2005-2019, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top