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Old 11-10-2017, 11:18 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Chicago60614 View Post
I can't speak for the others, but suburban Detroit has never lost population and it's economy has always been fairly solid, moving with national trends. There have been areas of the suburbs that have peaked and lost population, mostly due to smaller household sizes, but the decline overall has been almost entirely from the city itself.

Metro Detroit has been doing very well the past few years. Earlier this summer its unemployment rate hit 3.6% and has fluctuated back up to the low 4% range.

It's created 238,000 jobs in the past 7 years. The metro is seeing the first solid growth in jobs since the 1990's.

Michigan overall has been doing fantastic, packing on almost 500,000 jobs in the past six years.
Has Michigan reached 2007 employment numbers though? I know Buffalo and Cleveland have not so their growth is still only from economic recovery not uncharted territory that would drive growth.
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Old 11-10-2017, 11:22 AM
 
Location: IN
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Originally Posted by TPetty View Post
Will if you look at all the Sun Belt cities, such as Los Angeles, Phoenix, Houston, Miami, Dallas, Las Vegas, and even Myrtle Beach youíll see that their populations are thriving. They keep gaining more and more population. So as it stands out people in the younger generations are more attracted to the Sun Belt cities than the Rust Belt cities. Why the Rust Belt cities are declining, that could be because people in the younger generations donít want to live in them.
Demographically, Oakland County, Michigan does skew older in terms of age, but it doesn't negate the fact that it is one of the nicer suburban counties in the US with above average educational attainment, income, low unemployment rate, and many lakes with large conservation areas.
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Old 11-10-2017, 11:25 AM
 
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Originally Posted by TPetty View Post
Will if you look at all the Sun Belt cities, such as Los Angeles, Phoenix, Houston, Miami, Dallas, Las Vegas, and even Myrtle Beach you’ll see that their populations are thriving. They keep gaining more and more population. So as it stands out people in the younger generations are more attracted to the Sun Belt cities than the Rust Belt cities. Why the Rust Belt cities are declining, that could be because people in the younger generations don’t want to live in them.
There's been huge growth in millenial population in Pittsburgh over the last decade or so, I think one of the highest growth rates for that age group. There are tons of articles about this stuff but here is a random one

https://www.theatlantic.com/national...sburgh/383074/

Most of the sun belt places get a lot of retiree transplants and international immigration which is what most of the rustbelt cities get much less of.

Last edited by _Buster; 11-10-2017 at 11:38 AM..
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Old 11-10-2017, 11:44 AM
 
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Originally Posted by mjlo View Post
The other 4 counties surrounding it have not. What does it mean?
Well as you know, the city of Detroit lies in Wayne County. With that said, Detroit continues to suffer from population erosion and so does its many inner ring suburbs, such as Highland Park and Dearborn. Not has Detroit proper suffered from population erosion but so has its inner suburbs. If Wayne County wasnít losing population then neither would Detroit proper, be. And as for those surrounding counties, that is rather irrelevant to my point.
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Old 11-10-2017, 12:03 PM
 
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Originally Posted by _Buster View Post
There's been huge growth in millenial population in Pittsburgh over the last decade or so, I think one of the highest growth rates for that age group. There are tons of articles about this stuff but here is a random one

https://www.theatlantic.com/national...sburgh/383074/

Most of the sun belt places get a lot of retiree transplants and international immigration which is what most of the rustbelt cities get much less of.
Will if the Rust Belt could get more international immigrants than maybe just maybe, the Rust Belt cities could experience a population rebound. And as you know a few Rust Belt cities, such as Detroit, Cleveland, and Pittsburgh have become global cities. And I have a reference to back that up:

*https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Global_city
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Old 11-10-2017, 12:05 PM
 
3,963 posts, read 3,498,160 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TPetty View Post
Well as you know, the city of Detroit lies in Wayne County. With that said, Detroit continues to suffer from population erosion and so does its many inner ring suburbs, such as Highland Park and Dearborn. Not has Detroit proper suffered from population erosion but so has its inner suburbs. If Wayne County wasn’t losing population then neither would Detroit proper, be. And as for those surrounding counties, that is rather irrelevant to my point.
I believe you have it in reverse. If Detroit wasn't losing population, then Wayne County wouldn't be. I guess i'm just trying to figure out the significance of what you're saying. I don't know how it's irrelevant. Wayne County isn't an economic island from the rest of the Detroit region, the other counties don't foster different primary industries or markets. If only one county out of five in the same region is losing population, i'm trying to understand how that signifies the doom you're inferring.
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Old 11-10-2017, 12:17 PM
 
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Originally Posted by mjlo View Post
I believe you have it in reverse. If Detroit wasn't losing population, then Wayne County wouldn't be. I guess i'm just trying to figure out the significance of what you're saying. I don't know how it's irrelevant. Wayne County isn't an economic island from the rest of the Detroit region, the other counties don't foster different primary industries or markets. If only one county out of five in the same region is losing population, i'm trying to understand how that signifies the doom you're inferring.
Well letís put it this way if the rest of Wayne County could start regaining population then eventually Detroit proper, could could do the same. Now if you take all of Metro Detroit into consideration, it is still losing population. Itís true that maybe Oakland County is still gaining population, but Metro Detroit as a whole is still losing population.
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Old 11-10-2017, 12:31 PM
 
3,963 posts, read 3,498,160 times
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Originally Posted by TPetty View Post
Well let’s put it this way if the rest of Wayne County could start regaining population then eventually Detroit proper, could could do the same. Now if you take all of Metro Detroit into consideration, it is still losing population. It’s true that maybe Oakland County is still gaining population, but Metro Detroit as a whole is still losing population.
This is factually inaccurate. Metro Detroit is not losing population, it lost population from 04-2011 during Michigan's "10 year recession". It has posted population gains every years since 2011. Here's a snapshot of populations of the counties immediately surrounding Wayne County showing the 1970 census when Wayne peaked, and then today. Note every single one of them are gaining not just Oakland. Together they have only lost 48,000 people in 46 years. With current trends they will reclaim that peak in the next 5 years. Still not fully understanding.

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Old 11-10-2017, 03:28 PM
 
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Originally Posted by btownboss4 View Post
Has Michigan reached 2007 employment numbers though? I know Buffalo and Cleveland have not so their growth is still only from economic recovery not uncharted territory that would drive growth.
For Buffalo it depends on which statistical data you look at, the employers' survey or the household survey:

Per the monthly Jobs Report, based on the employer's survey, employment reached new peaks last year, and is currently at or near peak employment since at least 1990.

Per the monthly Labor Unemployment Rate data, based upon household survey, employment peaked in 1997, and near-peak was reached in 2008, but has since dropped and is still significantly lower than 2008.

https://www.labor.ny.gov/stats/

There is over 30k difference between the surveys as of 2017, although 10 years ago they were much closer together. At some point, I would guess, there should be some effort to better align each of the surveys to better reflect reality, as one or both is under or over reporting employment.
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Old 11-10-2017, 04:11 PM
 
387 posts, read 368,827 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mjlo View Post
This is factually inaccurate. Metro Detroit is not losing population, it lost population from 04-2011 during Michigan's "10 year recession". It has posted population gains every years since 2011. Here's a snapshot of populations of the counties immediately surrounding Wayne County showing the 1970 census when Wayne peaked, and then today. Note every single one of them are gaining not just Oakland. Together they have only lost 48,000 people in 46 years. With current trends they will reclaim that peak in the next 5 years. Still not fully understanding.
Will you could be right on this one, but one fact remains. Metro Cleveland and Metro Buffalo are both still losing population. Have a reference cited:

*https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_o...tistical_Areas

Look at Noís. 32 and 50.
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