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Old 06-20-2008, 06:55 PM
 
48,516 posts, read 84,032,619 times
Reputation: 18050

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Mostly liberals and socialist really. Remember Reagan was a FDR democart and changed parties when the socialist took over the democratic party.The old democratic party was never about income redistrbution thru government.
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Old 06-20-2008, 08:37 PM
 
214 posts, read 986,901 times
Reputation: 100
Actually scranbarre most of the government is democrats. People blame bush all day and I think he wasn`t that great of a president myself but why is he getting all the blame and not the liberal congress. We need a strong conservative in office like Reagon. Neither obama or mccain are that good anyways.
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Old 06-20-2008, 09:02 PM
 
Location: Southeast
4,296 posts, read 6,277,472 times
Reputation: 1445
Quote:
Originally Posted by ScranBarre View Post
Just look at how prosperous all of our nation's most liberal cities are---San Francisco, New York City, Boston, etc.
Yes, but also look how prosperous our nation's " most Conservative" cities are --- Atlanta, Dallas, Houston, Greenville, Birmingham, Richmond, Jackson, Nashville, Knoxville, Mobile - all are way up there on the fast growing, most affordable, and "best places to raise a family" lists.

Liberal cities are perfect for young professionals such as yourself, and I have no problem with that. But as for raising a family, or being a 'blue collar" worker, a Conservative suburb on the Sunbelt is much more appealing.

But, back on topic, the Rust Belt will eventually rebound, but as I said before, the region must change politically before this can occur. The beauty of Capitalism is that any market will bounce back once the way has been cleared. Current trends will change, and the Rust Belt will attract back those who were lost to the Sunbelt.
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Old 12-10-2009, 02:26 PM
Status: "I hate living in Georgia!!" (set 21 days ago)
 
48,291 posts, read 45,587,548 times
Reputation: 15368
Quote:
Originally Posted by Chicago60614 View Post
I wouldn't dump Milwaukee in there. I was just up there last weekend and was amazed at what a clean and beautiful city it was. The downtown was gorgeous, and the city seems very healthy. It lost some population, but almost every pre 1950's urban cities have as our country tends to "spread out" a little more than we use to, or anyone else in the world does.
I will give it to you there, Milwaukee has been cleaning up. I did a search on superfund sites. Most major cities have superfund sites, which is sad. There should be cleanups done. On that note, I checked the superfund sites for Milwaukee. There are 17. To put things into perspective, Atlanta,GA has 59 superfund sites inside the city. St. Louis(which has about half of Milwaukee's size) has 21 superfund sites. Philadelphia has 85 superfund sites. Birmingham,AL(a third of Milwaukee's size) has 26 superfund sites.
For Milwaukee's size, it is getting cleaner. My father, who is a Milwaukee native, tells me Milwaukee is cleaner than Atlanta. Personally, I think Milwaukee has the potential to be a "green city". It is cleaner than many cities(although there are superfund sites in MKE). If the green economy catches on in Milwaukee, the city can be even cleaner, and as a second note, the unemployment could come down. One thing Milwaukee needs plenty of is jobs.
In fact, the entire region stretching from MKE to PGH and Buffalo can benefit from the green economy. Manufacturing has been leaving for ages and won't come back. Let us be real. Many people are looking for a cheaper way out, and sending factories overseas is the option people look for. There are three options here: 1)March on DC and demand tougher laws against companies that outsource their jobs.
2)Be creative and start a new economy.
3)Do both.
I say that many places have little to lose. Jobs have been leaving and so have people. Pittsburgh and Detroit especially. Detroit has blocks of abandoned buildings that could be used for something else. Pittsburgh is already doing things such as robotics and pharmaceuticals. What PGH needs is more things. There are people in PGH that graduate from universities in Pittsburgh, but many people leave for 1)few jobs and 2)many people look for place that they feel would cater to those in the age range of 23-28. What Pittsburgh needs is to find a way to keep people in. I read a National Geographic from December 1991 about Pittsburgh:Stronger Than Steel. One of the towns near Pittsburgh was mentioned due to the constant decrease in population. I think it was Braddock. I can't remember. One man mentioned that one day the town would have to be leveled and to start over because everyone was leaving due to the mill jobs leaving. Another person saw Pittsburgh in a different light. His job was with the medical industry. He mentioned that because Pittsburgh's population was about half of what it was in the 1950's, there was plenty of room to go around, good schools, relatively cheap real estate, friendly neighborhoods and he rode his bike to work through Schenly Park. His view was basically that Pittsburgh already has things that people are going to other places for.
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Old 12-10-2009, 03:13 PM
 
12,825 posts, read 20,170,095 times
Reputation: 10910
Here's what would be required in order to the Rust Belt to rebound:
1) Immediate cessation of all excessive restrictions on CO2 output, energy usage, energy extraction, etc. I realize it's tough to define excessive, but I think we all know that things are currently excessive in terms of the regs (and PENDING / PROPOSED regs)
2) Right to work in all affected areas - in order to allow large industrial firms to better compete with right to work states and other countries
3) No more specific tax breaks / de facto government insurance for companies offshoring work
4) Do something about race relations - compared with other parts of the country, the black vs white issues are at their worst in the Rust Belt - white flight has done immense harm
5) Incentivization of personal savings and debt reduction in order to redirect the money supply into industrial investment
6) Fair trade instead of free trade, in the following manner: Instead of freely trading with all nations, the US should only trade with truly free nations featuring both social and economic freedom - yes, that means a de facto embargo with China.
7) Reduce the Federal Debt (and the Federal Budget in general)
8) Get out of NAFTA, WTO, UN and all other silly internationalist utopian groups. We need to recover our sovereignty
9) Like it or not, defense spending and war preparations create real jobs. Reverse the ill founded defense draw down that has been going on since the late 1980s, and adopt, in general, more of a true war footing, similar to what we had during the Cold War. The players may have shifted somewhat but the international scene is just as threatening (if not moreso) than it was 40 years ago.
10) Ride herd on illegal immigration. This will result in some inflation however the positive impacts on wages, nation wide, will vastly counteract the negative effects. By returning to wage sanity and an atmosphere of home grown industrial excellence, the US as a whole and particularly the Rust Belt would rebound, with fair wages set by the market without the corrosive undermining impacts of illegal labor and traitorous offshoring of American economic activity.

(BTW - what I've written here would apply equally to the Formerly-golden State - aka Rust Belt II)

Last edited by BayAreaHillbilly; 12-10-2009 at 03:21 PM..
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Old 06-01-2010, 04:50 PM
 
Location: The Lakes
2,372 posts, read 4,456,112 times
Reputation: 1136
Quote:
Originally Posted by Chicago60614 View Post
I think most areas of the midwest are healthy. When we hear "rustbelt" we all think of Cleveland, Detroit, Gary, Flint.

The combined population of those cities is around 1,500,000 people.

This is around 2.2% of the population of the Midwest as a whole. So a VAST majority of people live outside these depressed urban centers. Most people either live in smaller towns, or more likely, suburbs. The Detroit and Cleveland suburbs, where most of the people live, are fine. They certainly don't look like central detroit.
You're leaving out Milwaukee, Duluth, Baltimore, Peoria, Buffalo, Rochester, Syracuse, Akron, Youngstown, Grand Rapids, Lansing, Erie and other major cities that've been hit hard by the manufacturing bust.
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Old 06-01-2010, 04:55 PM
 
Location: The Lakes
2,372 posts, read 4,456,112 times
Reputation: 1136
Quote:
Originally Posted by BayAreaHillbilly View Post
Here's what would be required in order to the Rust Belt to rebound:
1) Immediate cessation of all excessive restrictions on CO2 output, energy usage, energy extraction, etc. I realize it's tough to define excessive, but I think we all know that things are currently excessive in terms of the regs (and PENDING / PROPOSED regs)
2) Right to work in all affected areas - in order to allow large industrial firms to better compete with right to work states and other countries
3) No more specific tax breaks / de facto government insurance for companies offshoring work
4) Do something about race relations - compared with other parts of the country, the black vs white issues are at their worst in the Rust Belt - white flight has done immense harm
5) Incentivization of personal savings and debt reduction in order to redirect the money supply into industrial investment
6) Fair trade instead of free trade, in the following manner: Instead of freely trading with all nations, the US should only trade with truly free nations featuring both social and economic freedom - yes, that means a de facto embargo with China.
7) Reduce the Federal Debt (and the Federal Budget in general)
8) Get out of NAFTA, WTO, UN and all other silly internationalist utopian groups. We need to recover our sovereignty
9) Like it or not, defense spending and war preparations create real jobs. Reverse the ill founded defense draw down that has been going on since the late 1980s, and adopt, in general, more of a true war footing, similar to what we had during the Cold War. The players may have shifted somewhat but the international scene is just as threatening (if not moreso) than it was 40 years ago.
10) Ride herd on illegal immigration. This will result in some inflation however the positive impacts on wages, nation wide, will vastly counteract the negative effects. By returning to wage sanity and an atmosphere of home grown industrial excellence, the US as a whole and particularly the Rust Belt would rebound, with fair wages set by the market without the corrosive undermining impacts of illegal labor and traitorous offshoring of American economic activity.

(BTW - what I've written here would apply equally to the Formerly-golden State - aka Rust Belt II)
I'm glad SOMEBODY finally gets it.
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Old 06-01-2010, 05:54 PM
 
1,250 posts, read 2,120,327 times
Reputation: 279
My guess is that it would once generations after the baby boomers hold the power in places. From my observation it is often the attitudes of the people residing there are the problem. Also the younger generations won't have the biases and also only know of the decline firsthand so they can make the hard choices. Also the recovery will be last in the core of the rust belt where it is most affected and issues most entrenched. In the Midwest in general the fringes outside the great lakes have at least stabilized and mostly never got as severe a downturn to start with. Also being closer to other areas of the country would also make it easier to adapt as well.
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Old 06-01-2010, 06:15 PM
 
Location: The Lakes
2,372 posts, read 4,456,112 times
Reputation: 1136
Also, liberals nor Reagan-style conservatives are the answer. We need tariffs and pride in our products again.
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Old 06-01-2010, 08:24 PM
 
Location: metro ATL
8,190 posts, read 12,348,696 times
Reputation: 2698
Yes. I'm looking forward to seeing cities like St. Louis, Detroit, Cleveland, etc. regain their shine.
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