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Old 06-17-2008, 01:48 PM
 
Location: New Mexico to Texas
4,552 posts, read 13,469,790 times
Reputation: 2125

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Quote:
Originally Posted by radraja View Post
Jobs, jobs, jobs. People go where the jobs are. Climate can be a factor as well.
there are jobs everywhere, with all the people following each other to the same city dosent it make it harder to get a job, I wouldnt want to move from my city to go find work at a Lowe's or a call center.Is there that many good jobs to support all these people moving in.
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Old 06-17-2008, 03:50 PM
 
Location: Upstate NY native, now living in Houston
663 posts, read 2,039,883 times
Reputation: 201
Quote:
Originally Posted by desert sun View Post
there are jobs everywhere, with all the people following each other to the same city dosent it make it harder to get a job, I wouldnt want to move from my city to go find work at a Lowe's or a call center.Is there that many good jobs to support all these people moving in.
My thoughts exactly! And if you leave City A for a job in City B, well doesn't that also leave an openinig in City A? Jobs really are everywhere.
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Old 06-17-2008, 04:06 PM
 
51 posts, read 223,414 times
Reputation: 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by atlantagreg30127 View Post
Since around 1979, the metro Atlanta area has been adding from a low of 55,000 to a high of 150,000 people per year, every year, into the area. When I moved here in 1984 the metro population was only just reaching 2 million people. Today, there are 5.1 million.

Funny thing is, while our economy is relatively strong (compared to others), and likewise the job market is diverse, you still here a number of, "So, this is it??", comments from people AFTER they move here.

Atlanta is an extremely "hyped-up" city by corporate headhunters, relocation services, realtors, etc. It is also touted as being "the place" for professional blacks to move to by various black publications and headhunters as well. Since the 1996 Olympics, Atlanta got on the map with International people as well, and the numbers of foreign residents has taken a large upswing since then, too.

Once here, they find the reality of Atlanta... that there are lots of jobs, but not a lot of WELL PAYING jobs in specialized fields. That there is a LOT of congestion, traffic, sprawl, smog, and crime. That certain types of cultural ammenities are lacking, and public transit is somewhat stagnent. It's certainly not Detroit or anything, but it's not the golden promised land that many think it will be for them. Atlanta is an excellent example of how well thought out marketing can cause masses of people to migrate.
I agree, and finally after 13 years here, I have the opportunity to leave.
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Old 06-18-2008, 02:16 AM
 
2,502 posts, read 8,056,121 times
Reputation: 885
Quote:
Originally Posted by desert sun View Post
there are jobs everywhere, with all the people following each other to the same city dosent it make it harder to get a job, I wouldnt want to move from my city to go find work at a Lowe's or a call center.Is there that many good jobs to support all these people moving in.
Well...the thing is, a lot of people can't get a job anywhere they want. Jobs are actually really limited in some cities (such as cities that are losing major companies).

On the other hand, cities that are growing economically (by gaining lots of new businesses) are constantly creating new jobs. There is competition for top jobs, yes, but because of their growth, these cities still typically have enough jobs constantly in circulation that everyone can find something in their field.
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Old 06-18-2008, 02:23 AM
 
746 posts, read 3,459,529 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jd433 View Post
2 of the 3 fastest growing metros 2000-2007 are in TEXAS.Atlanta was the fastest. People are moving here in droves. In Houston the outskirts of town look like one enormous construction site with thousands of homes under construction at the same time.
It's true..but..how long can it buck the national trend, as loan money
for construction retail/residential taps out nationwide? Houston indeed is bucking a massive national trend....

Some things that may stunt that growth.................

Too many people from everywhere else coming in, taxing the infrastructure, and diluting the job market

Energy sector tanking, when people start discoving bicycles again when gas hits 6 dollars a gallon in 2009....

Pollution and sheer overcrowding, ala post-katrina, pushing people away from area, as those that are marginal feast on those few making money..

The tech sector tanking....lots of that in Houston(and Dallas as well)

Or I coul be wrong, and it will boom contrary for many years....hard to say how Houston and DFW will play out..
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Old 06-18-2008, 10:28 AM
 
9,030 posts, read 16,455,999 times
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many reasons, jobs, cost of living, quality of life, activity options, etc

i moved from philadelphia, to minneapolis, to phoenix ....... i can tell you without a doubt phoenix is a lot more open to newcomers and has a lot more opportunity than minneapolis which is a pretty closed society

my brother lives in albuquerque - doesn't like it, but that is where his wifes family is from - i have absolutely no need other than family to spend an ounce of time there - way too small

but to some phoenix is way too big

it's all a matter of preference - doesn't make one right or wrong or one better than the other ......... it's just what suits you

a lot of it is opportunity driven and growth begets growth - when an area expands they need basic services such as eduation, health care, police, fire, etc ........ in some of the tradtional communities like those found in the mid-west jobs in such sectors are hard to come by - population is stable and there isn't much turnover

so they follow the jobs so to speak ......... i know so many midwestern teachers it's insane living here in phoenix .... my sister in law just moved back to the midwest and was fighting 160 other applicants in a small population area for an open position
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Old 06-18-2008, 05:04 PM
 
Location: Upstate NY native, now living in Houston
663 posts, read 2,039,883 times
Reputation: 201
Quote:
Originally Posted by scongress1234 View Post
It's true..but..how long can it buck the national trend, as loan money
for construction retail/residential taps out nationwide? Houston indeed is bucking a massive national trend....

Some things that may stunt that growth.................

Too many people from everywhere else coming in, taxing the infrastructure, and diluting the job market

Energy sector tanking, when people start discoving bicycles again when gas hits 6 dollars a gallon in 2009....

Pollution and sheer overcrowding, ala post-katrina, pushing people away from area, as those that are marginal feast on those few making money..

The tech sector tanking....lots of that in Houston(and Dallas as well)

Or I coul be wrong, and it will boom contrary for many years....hard to say how Houston and DFW will play out..
Everyone! Take heed to this post! I think this poster hit it on the nose ...
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Old 06-18-2008, 06:04 PM
 
2,502 posts, read 8,056,121 times
Reputation: 885
If anything, I think the current population trends are simply following the "food coloring in a glass of water" theory.

For the longest time, the vast majority of the US population was isolated to the northeast and midwest. Even though the western states were discovered, not many people were willing to venture that far. And although the southern states were established, the negative connotations kept people north.

For the longest time, our population was like a drop of food coloring....although the glass of water was huge, the color initially lingered around one spot. But with time, food coloring starts to evenly spread throughout the glass. I think that's what's happening to the US. We're finally starting to spread out and fill cities throughout the country. I think it really is a process of evening out the population.
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Old 06-19-2008, 12:04 AM
 
Location: New Mexico to Texas
4,552 posts, read 13,469,790 times
Reputation: 2125
Quote:
Originally Posted by Finger Laker View Post
many reasons, jobs, cost of living, quality of life, activity options, etc

i moved from philadelphia, to minneapolis, to phoenix ....... i can tell you without a doubt phoenix is a lot more open to newcomers and has a lot more opportunity than minneapolis which is a pretty closed society

my brother lives in albuquerque - doesn't like it, but that is where his wifes family is from - i have absolutely no need other than family to spend an ounce of time there - way too small

but to some phoenix is way too big

it's all a matter of preference - doesn't make one right or wrong or one better than the other ......... it's just what suits you

a lot of it is opportunity driven and growth begets growth - when an area expands they need basic services such as eduation, health care, police, fire, etc ........ in some of the tradtional communities like those found in the mid-west jobs in such sectors are hard to come by - population is stable and there isn't much turnover

so they follow the jobs so to speak ......... i know so many midwestern teachers it's insane living here in phoenix .... my sister in law just moved back to the midwest and was fighting 160 other applicants in a small population area for an open position

Well I just wondered why everyone flocked to Phoenix,to me its the crummiest city in America,I would rather live in Minnesota and get snowed in than live in Phoenix, and Albuquerque is small and thats what most people like about it and Phoenix is the city I hate to spend an ounce of my time in,I had concert tickets for a show I wanted so bad, but I decided to lose my $100 dollars cause I just couldnt get myself to go to Phoenix.

I ask this question cause there are so many nice cities out there that are growing-
Ashville,NC
Amarillo,TX
Boise,ID
Huntsville,AL
Columbia,SC
Nashville,TN
Lexington,KY
Colorado Springs,CO
Columbus,OH
even Omaha,NE
and too many others to name, if it were me I would pick a place a little less ran over by everyone and their mamas.
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Old 06-19-2008, 10:05 AM
 
9,030 posts, read 16,455,999 times
Reputation: 6822
but that is just you

i absolutely love 90% of what boise has to offer - but it's too small for me as well

i could dig nashville, but my wife didn't like the entertainment scene

The Springs is beautiful and I like the climate - but once again too small

But something that all these cities are offering is a growth in employers and opportunity - as stated earlier, growth begets growth

also word of mouth spreads - you move to city X - you have some friends and family come and visit, maybe they like it and now that they know someone down there they decide to move as well - repeat and repeat
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