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Old 06-19-2008, 03:10 PM
 
Location: Chicago
3,340 posts, read 8,711,215 times
Reputation: 1215

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Quote:
Originally Posted by desert sun View Post

even Omaha,NE
Yay!
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Old 06-20-2008, 08:53 AM
 
769 posts, read 2,012,468 times
Reputation: 407
Quote:
Originally Posted by radraja View Post
Jobs, jobs, jobs. People go where the jobs are. Climate can be a factor as well.
Yes, true. Jobs and climate. Physical climate as well as social climate. They may have the type of job I want as well as the warm climate I seek in Miami but the social climate wouldn't work out. Too many negative people. I also see they have good jobs in Dallas and I like the warmer weather it has there compared to Minneapolis. But it doesn't have the vibrant social buzz I look for in a city.

Las Vegas gets a lot of people because it advertises itself as being great for swingers and people who get rich quick. Salt Lake City doesn't get as many people because it doesn't advertise itself as anything special (which is true). Vegas, L.A., Chicago, Atlanta, and other cities advertise themselves as being vibrant and energetic. There might be better jobs in say, Des Moines, but there isn't nearly as vibrant an atmosphere in Des Moines as in Chicago.
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Old 06-20-2008, 02:17 PM
 
Location: Denver, CO
5,608 posts, read 20,734,712 times
Reputation: 5348
Quote:
Originally Posted by desert sun View Post
Well I just wondered why everyone flocked to Phoenix,to me its the crummiest city in America,I would rather live in Minnesota and get snowed in than live in Phoenix, and Albuquerque is small and thats what most people like about it and Phoenix is the city I hate to spend an ounce of my time in,I had concert tickets for a show I wanted so bad, but I decided to lose my $100 dollars cause I just couldnt get myself to go to Phoenix.

I ask this question cause there are so many nice cities out there that are growing-
Ashville,NC
Amarillo,TX
Boise,ID
Huntsville,AL
Columbia,SC
Nashville,TN
Lexington,KY
Colorado Springs,CO
Columbus,OH
even Omaha,NE
and too many others to name, if it were me I would pick a place a little less ran over by everyone and their mamas.
I completely agree with you, desert sun! I remember when you posted on the Phoenix forum asking about where to stay for your concert. That's a shame to hear it didn't work out. In my opinion, even though PHX is a huge city (~4 million people) and ABQ is a small city (about ~750k, right?), Albuquerque does a much better job of being a small city than Phoenix does at being a big city. Las Vegas has more problems than Phoenix, but it's also a much more unique, happening, vibrant place. I've never been to Amarillo, TX before-- perhaps it is a hidden gem of a city that nobody knows about? Who knows? But point is, there is a place for everybody-- I agree with your point-- why don't people looking to relocate to somewhere new spread out a little bit and find somewhere a little more unique to call home?
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Old 06-20-2008, 04:11 PM
 
4,126 posts, read 4,468,498 times
Reputation: 1615
Quote:
Originally Posted by scongress1234 View Post
It's true..but..how long can it buck the national trend, as loan money
for construction retail/residential taps out nationwide? Houston indeed is bucking a massive national trend....

Some things that may stunt that growth.................

Too many people from everywhere else coming in, taxing the infrastructure, and diluting the job market

Energy sector tanking, when people start discoving bicycles again when gas hits 6 dollars a gallon in 2009....

Pollution and sheer overcrowding, ala post-katrina, pushing people away from area, as those that are marginal feast on those few making money..

The tech sector tanking....lots of that in Houston(and Dallas as well)

Or I coul be wrong, and it will boom contrary for many years....hard to say how Houston and DFW will play out..
I was raised in Houston. Houston was a major boom town in the 1970s. It was riding an oil boom that burst in the late 1970s. By 1982 the city was overbuilt, the rising property values were dropping to below pre-boom prices. One day I was blowing money faster than a rock star and the next I was flat broke heading to California on a motorcycle.

I don't trust boom towns as far as I can throw them. I've seen too many booms collapse. I prefer an area with a more diverse economic base. Places that grow quickly based on a single or limited sector tend to fall even more quickly.

Last edited by Joe_Ryder; 06-20-2008 at 04:12 PM.. Reason: just because
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Old 07-04-2008, 07:56 PM
 
Location: Miami, Florida
210 posts, read 1,064,177 times
Reputation: 161
Good weather is major deciding factor when choosing a city to live. Atlanta, Las Vegas, Los Angeles, Miami, Phoniex, and Houston are the fastest growing major U.S cities, what do they have in common? Good weather, after enduring years of harsh winters in the Northeast and Midwest people tend to get sick of it and look for sunshine
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Old 07-04-2008, 09:09 PM
 
Location: U.S.A.
283 posts, read 1,174,806 times
Reputation: 154
We might be getting a Dairy Queen here in Utopia, Texas.
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Old 07-04-2008, 09:34 PM
 
2,153 posts, read 5,004,923 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Eastender67 View Post
We might be getting a Dairy Queen here in Utopia, Texas.
Sign me up for some Condo developments! I smell an economic BOOM (or should I say taste! The chicken finger basket is awesome)!!!!!
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Old 07-04-2008, 09:43 PM
 
Location: Baton Rouge
1,734 posts, read 5,063,674 times
Reputation: 651
Quote:
Originally Posted by Go Ne View Post
In Omaha, our outskirts have really slowed in their growth. Instead, most of it is developing Downtown in condo towers or renovating old buildings into condos.
It's the same in Baton Rouge. The suburbs literally exploded in the 90's and early 2000's, and though they are still growing fairly quickly, the new fad here is luxury condo developments that are built like self-sustaining communities. There's one called Perkins Rowe and it's layed out like a small community where every thing is within walking distance. It has it's own movie theater, restaurants, coffee shops, book stores, clothing and accessory retailers, even a medical center. It's actually pretty neat, though. The retail shops are in buildings built to resemble typical old historic main street type buildings, with luxury condos in the upper floors. I guess this new fad has developed as a result of gas prices and effort to reduce pollution.
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Old 07-04-2008, 10:29 PM
 
835 posts, read 2,085,630 times
Reputation: 249
I'd rather have people all flocking to one city in The South and dilute the culture there than throughout the whole state. Not that I want them doing that to any city.
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Old 07-05-2008, 12:10 AM
 
Location: Chicago
3,340 posts, read 8,711,215 times
Reputation: 1215
Quote:
Originally Posted by MetroBTR View Post
It's the same in Baton Rouge. The suburbs literally exploded in the 90's and early 2000's, and though they are still growing fairly quickly, the new fad here is luxury condo developments that are built like self-sustaining communities. There's one called Perkins Rowe and it's layed out like a small community where every thing is within walking distance. It has it's own movie theater, restaurants, coffee shops, book stores, clothing and accessory retailers, even a medical center. It's actually pretty neat, though. The retail shops are in buildings built to resemble typical old historic main street type buildings, with luxury condos in the upper floors. I guess this new fad has developed as a result of gas prices and effort to reduce pollution.
Yep, that pretty much what happened in Omaha, between 1990 and 2000, the Omaha metro gained 150,000 people, not a single county was added in that time.
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