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Old 06-23-2008, 08:08 AM
 
Location: Philadelphia,New Jersey, NYC!
6,967 posts, read 18,208,147 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by juppiter View Post
The ones in NY can be greedy. They demanded $1 from the state for every car that drives over "their" land. It's ridiculous.

It's just not fair how they aren't subject to the same laws as everyone else. When my family came over from Italy 50 years ago, they settled in a neighborhood that was largely Jewish. I'm sure they had never met Jews back in Italy, but they became friendly with them. They did not expect to live on an "Italian Reservation" and ignore state laws.
i got nothing
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Old 06-23-2008, 08:56 AM
 
6 posts, read 17,595 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by WILWRadio View Post
A good friend of mine is married to a Native American Indian woman from Nebraska. Currently they live on a Reservation. My friend also has a legal background and does extensive research on this subject. I also have another friend that is well acquainted with the top leadership of the Mashantucket Pequots in Connecticut.

According to research done and based upon the way the original treaties were written and then signed only the Federal government has any legal jurisdiction over the Indian nations. States, counties and towns are not supposed to be imposing any of their will onto the Native American's on their land. If they are then it is illegal laws created by these governments that conflict with the Treaties and Federal law.

We've seen a lot of laws get created in recent years that violate other laws and contradict original laws already on the books. Look at how the Constitution is being trashed by the Politicians and it is the Supreme law of our land.
This is exactly what I was mentioning. First of all, many, many treaties were not kept, nor are kept. Just recently in New York, the first case to LOSE a fight for the upkeep of a treaty happened.

However, in response to your comment on how the relationship Tribes have to the local and state governments, for the most part that is true, as long as the land is in TRUST status. If it is not in trust status, then the local governments can impose taxes and what not.

For utilities, these are services that the reservations have to pay for outside of the reservation, as often they cannot proved that service for themselves. This is where local governments can 'weasel' in and take advantage of a tribes presence.

Right now, as it stands, it takes roughly 31 days to take a land out of trust, meaning that it is open for non-Indian owners to buy. When attempting to put land back into trust, it takes roughly 3 years. Only the Secretary of the Interior or Congress can allow for land to go into trust. It is surprising that many tribes have begun to opt for the Congress venue, as the Department of the Interior has been so slow to grant trust status, that getting a majority from Congress seems more plausible. I'm sure all of us understand the meaning of this.

I want a healthy discourse on here, so please, anyone who wants to show some disdain about the sovereign nation status or the status of Native Americans in todays society, please speak up. If you don't, then how will your questions be answered??? Also, those of you who are in support of Native Americans, many have preconceived notions of how reservations work (i.e. the way the state plays into the management of reservations) so many of your questions can be answered too!

Let the discourse continue, please!
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Old 06-23-2008, 09:25 AM
 
Location: Phoenix metro
20,005 posts, read 69,400,887 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by juppiter View Post
The ones in NY can be greedy. They demanded $1 from the state for every car that drives over "their" land. It's ridiculous.
It IS their land. It was theirs to begin with.
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Old 06-23-2008, 10:29 AM
 
Location: San Antonio
10,238 posts, read 18,746,338 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Steve-o View Post
It IS their land. It was theirs to begin with.
Well that depends on who and when. For instance during the Beaver Wars of the 1600s the Iroquois went on an expansionist campaign that led to the extinction of several Indian nations by them and a large increase in the Iroquois lands, much of which was subsequently lost to Chippewa and Ottawa counter offensives.

Speaking of the Chippewas much of their land in the pays den haute used to belong to the Sioux and Cheyenne whom the Chippewas, in search of furs drove from the woods onto the plains where the Sioux and Cheyenne then fell upon and dispossesed the Kiowas and Crows and Pawnees and......well you get the picture.

So yeah, the land originally belonged to Indians but which ones and when is rather complicated. Like any other history I reckon.

Regards
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Old 06-23-2008, 10:55 PM
 
74 posts, read 326,965 times
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What I find interesting is that Native peoples from the South Pacific seemed to have retained most of their culture. These are cultures that were not forced to assimilate. On the contrary, it almost seemed as if visitors to these islands were the ones to assimilate. The artist Paul Gauguin, and many others were totally enamored with the beauty of the Polynesian people and their culture. Similarly, the Inuit people have retained their culture probably because of the sheer brutality of the climate in which they lived.
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Old 06-23-2008, 11:30 PM
 
Location: L.A.(not Los Angeles)
16 posts, read 88,904 times
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I find Native Americans to be a very freindly good-hearted people( I know a few Cherokee personaly). After all they did help the pilgrims from Britain in the early 1600s(Squanto). I feel in many ways that most tribes have been cheated by the US. I would be happy to support any calls they have for greater autonomy or payments for stolen land or massacares.
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Old 06-23-2008, 11:41 PM
 
Location: In The Outland
6,023 posts, read 11,902,635 times
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I just drove by the site of the Baker massacre today, it's on the hi-line of Mt.
There is a sign telling of a village of Blackfeet women and children getting slaughtered by solders while the men were off hunting in the Sweetgrass hills.
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Old 06-24-2008, 01:02 AM
 
Location: New England & The Maritimes
2,116 posts, read 4,201,666 times
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Maybey my favourite race even more than white people which I am.
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Old 06-27-2008, 01:28 PM
 
6 posts, read 17,595 times
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What are peoples thoughts on the following information:

Currently a researcher by the name of Stefanie Raymond-Whish is conducting tests to see if Uranium is the main cause for increased breast cancer in those who are exposed to it. Her primary focus is on the women in the Navajo tribes in Arizona. Similar to her experiments there has been studies done on the Prairie Island Mdewakaton community in Red Wing, Minnesota and their relationship to the nuclear power plant near by. Also in tandem with these two are the Inupiat Eskimos who are affected by the remnants of nuclear waste from the past 30-40 years.

There are dissenters in many different fields, saying that the increase in breast cancer, and other forms of cancer, is most likely caused by other forms, not the uranium (and in some cases stronium). If the government is the one who started these mines or waste sites, what should occur? If it was a non-government actor, what should happen?

In the case of Prairie Island, the power plant has to purchase land away from the area for the tribe to relocate to, but many people know that the land they live on now is their land. It is where their ancestors lived, it is where they grew up, and they want it to be where their children to grow up. Should the money that the power plant provides be enough? And should this be similar to that of the other two examples?

Let me know what you think? These cases are unique because, aside from the downwinder victims, this isn't really something that other people have to deal with; it is startling disproportionate to Native Americans. Is this a land management problem, or is it something else?
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Old 06-27-2008, 03:21 PM
 
Location: San Antonio
10,238 posts, read 18,746,338 times
Reputation: 10164
People that live near nuclear powerhouses aren't exposed to uranium. Mines might be a different matter.
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