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Old 06-26-2008, 10:25 AM
 
11,883 posts, read 32,920,559 times
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Nashville is thickly wooded and has some large forests within the city.

All pics are of scenes within Nashville's city limits (NOT the suburbs) and were taken from Google Images:





Downtown farmers market:



Vanderbilt University (Nashville Midtown):



http://www.vanderbilt.edu/viewbook/photos/aerialwestend.jpg (broken link)

http://peabody.vanderbilt.edu/images/homepage/aerial_view_home.jpg (broken link)

Nashville International Airport (4 miles from downtown Nashville):



Radnor Lake:





Warner Parks:






Last edited by JMT; 06-26-2008 at 11:46 AM..
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Old 06-26-2008, 11:24 AM
 
1,071 posts, read 4,019,235 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by WILWRadio View Post
Cincinnati is heavily treed and actually has some forests inside the I 275 outer belt. Devou Forest/Park in suburban Covington, KY comes immediately to mind.
no doubt. mt. airy forest is one of the biggest urban forests in the country too.
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Old 06-26-2008, 12:28 PM
 
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Dallas has the Great Trinity Forest (http://www.trinityrivercorridor.org/html/great_trinity_forest.html - broken link)
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Old 06-26-2008, 04:09 PM
 
Location: Ca2Mo2Ga2Va!
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Yep, that is at least one good thing about Atlanta, alot of trees!
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Old 06-26-2008, 05:36 PM
 
Location: Dallas
808 posts, read 3,276,561 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Lakewooder View Post
Dallas has the Great Trinity Forest (http://www.trinityrivercorridor.org/html/great_trinity_forest.html - broken link)
Pics of the Great Trinity Forest:


http://www.tx.audubon.org/images/Trinity_MCCOMMAS.jpg (broken link)
http://evergreenlandco.com/page_images/property_images/trinity.jpg (broken link)

Keep in mind that this is IN the Dallas city limits!

From Audubon Texas' website:
Quote:
The Great Trinity Forest, at 6,000 acres, is the largest urban bottomland hardwood forest in North America.
Audubon Texas - Trinity River Audubon Center > Plants & Animals (http://www.tx.audubon.org/Trinity_Plants.html# - broken link)
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Old 06-26-2008, 05:49 PM
 
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Keep in mind that this is IN the Dallas city limits!



Which doesn't really mean a whole lot, considering Dallas is hundreds and hundreds of square miles.
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Old 06-27-2008, 08:44 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by south-to-west View Post
Scran-Barre,

Atlanta is great, but I'll admit that the suburbs are terrible with a few exceptions. However, your neck of the woods in NE PA is quickly becoming a huge "Sunbelt" style suburb of Greater NYC.
Yeah, so can we call Scranton "Little Atlanta" or something. I really like how Pittsburgh, Seattle, Portland look. ATL looks good too.
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Old 06-27-2008, 09:23 AM
 
Location: Polish Hill, Pittsburgh, PA
30,205 posts, read 67,351,355 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BravoFan View Post
Yeah, so can we call Scranton "Little Atlanta" or something. I really like how Pittsburgh, Seattle, Portland look. ATL looks good too.
We can call Scranton "Little Newark."
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Old 06-27-2008, 04:15 PM
 
Location: 602/520
2,441 posts, read 6,122,606 times
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DC, Atlanta, and Norfolk.

All are very similar in that they are home to dense, thick, dark-green forests, especially in their suburbs and surrounding cities.

All have somewhat similar climates in terms of temperature and rainfall, Atlanta and Norfolk having almost identical climates, so I guess it's understandable.
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Old 06-27-2008, 05:00 PM
 
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How come no one has mentioned New York City's Central Park?
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