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Old 06-26-2008, 01:29 AM
 
Location: Road Warrior
2,015 posts, read 5,004,825 times
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Spokane, WA comes pretty close
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Old 06-26-2008, 10:03 AM
 
1,071 posts, read 4,017,717 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by isle of lucy View Post
Also, I just looked this up on Google Images and a post from this forum had this image of Covington:



This is the closest I have found. I think the only thing missing is an abundance of old buildings/architecture but it might just be the picture I am looking for...
covington is very urban and old; i consider it "south cincinnati". but it's so connected to cincinnati, i don't know if you were willing to live across the river from a big city. you can check out covington on google maps street view.
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Old 06-26-2008, 04:51 PM
 
5,772 posts, read 13,724,871 times
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I'm wondering about the size city you specified, especially since you're saying that Louisville seems to fit. Louisville is a substantially larger city than the population range you listed. I'm also curious about how "European" the architecture needs to look. When I think of classic European urban architecture, I picture old stone churches, narrow streets closely lined with densely-packed tall narrow houses with steep slate roofs, and large public buildings that resemble old palaces. Not too much of this kind of architecture in the U.S. Are you basically looking more for old classic architecture?

Now a few suggestions, though it's tough to think of anything that fits perfectly:

Dubuque. Back to the question of what size city you're looking for. Dubuque's population is a bit smaller than you specified, but check this link to C-D's page about Dubuque. Dubuque, Iowa (IA) Detailed Profile - relocation, real estate, travel, jobs, hospitals, schools, crime, news, sex offenders I'm not personally familiar with this city, but these pictures give the impression that it's fairly urban, even if it is a small city. Also, I'm not sure about the landscape across the river. One post I saw about East Dubuque, IL, described it as a quaint small town, rather than having a suburban character.

Another town with a few question marks but maybe worth a look: Portsmouth, NH. I'm not sure whether you want something that's strictly an inland river city, so that's one question mark. Still, even though Portsmouth's general locale is coastal, Portsmouth itself is a mile or two upstream, on the banks of a river. Might be a smaller city than you're looking for, another question mark. Also, Kittery, ME, the town directly across the river, though technically a suburb, is more of a regular town, blue-collar in some neighborhoods, without lots of subdivision suburban character.

Back to Iowa. Possibly Cedar Rapids. This is another city I'm not familiar with, so I'm not sure whether it has the urban character on one side of the river and suburban directly across. If so, the other question would be whether you need the suburban-looking area to be a separate town. On the map, it appears that both sides of the river are part of Cedar Rapids.

Another stretch, maybe, but Richmond occurs to me as at least a possibility. This fits better if it turns out that you can go with a somewhat larger city than the range in your original post (as in if Louisville would work). The other question marks there would be again whether the suburban area has to be a separate town rather than an outlying part of the city itself, and how crucial it is to have an area of suburban character directly across the river from downtown. Richmond's central city area of more urban character occupies both the north and south banks of the James River, with neighborhoods that have more of a suburban look spreading out to the west of downtown, but also occupying both banks of the river, so you have urban across the river from urban, and suburban across the river from suburban, but not much in the way of one of each type of area facing the other directly across the river.

Hmmm, it does seem difficult to come up with a place that's a perfect fit. Best of luck with your search for that perfect fictional but real place.
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Old 06-26-2008, 06:15 PM
 
Location: Ca2Mo2Ga2Va!
2,736 posts, read 5,950,951 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Katiana View Post
Some of the cities on the Mississippi River in Ill/Iowa/Mo. I'm too lazy to get out a map right now.
I was thinking like Hannibal, Mo, where Mark Twain/Samuel Clemmons is from
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Old 06-26-2008, 07:32 PM
 
Location: San Francisco/East Bay and Los Angeles, formerly DC and Boston
2,138 posts, read 3,430,193 times
Reputation: 1811
Lawrence, Kansas
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Old 06-27-2008, 09:47 AM
 
Location: Omaha
1,137 posts, read 2,049,995 times
Reputation: 321
I don't mean to bring up a sour issue, but Omaha?

Omaha has older buildings within it's downtown and Old Market area, and downtown comes right up to the river with Council Bluffs, IA, and Omaha suburb on the other side. It is called Council BLUFFS for a reason, as there are high hills on both sides of the river with a flood plane in-between. Omaha does not fit your population specifications though. Otherwise, I don't see why it isn't a good fit.
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Old 06-27-2008, 12:18 PM
 
11,874 posts, read 32,904,313 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 2Adam29 View Post
I don't mean to bring up a sour issue, but Omaha?

Omaha has older buildings within it's downtown and Old Market area, and downtown comes right up to the river with Council Bluffs, IA, and Omaha suburb on the other side. It is called Council BLUFFS for a reason, as there are high hills on both sides of the river with a flood plane in-between. Omaha does not fit your population specifications though. Otherwise, I don't see why it isn't a good fit.
Good. Grief. You admit that Omaha doesn't fit the OP's requirements yet you're pushing it anyway. What is it with people from Omaha??
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Old 06-27-2008, 12:25 PM
 
Location: Chicago
3,340 posts, read 8,703,819 times
Reputation: 1215
Don't blame me, I said Rapid City
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Old 06-27-2008, 12:51 PM
 
139 posts, read 407,201 times
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Absolutely Chattanooga, TN - it's actually a pretty perfect description of its location on the bluffs of the Tennessee River - downtown on one side, suburbs on the other. It's slightly larger than you mention, but not much.
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Old 06-27-2008, 01:04 PM
 
Location: The Rock!
2,370 posts, read 6,995,262 times
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Little Rock has most all of those with the exception of a lot of "European" influence. It does have more older structures than some of these others though. The city proper size is just barely larger than what you're looking for at 184K.

The north side of the river has a small downtown area but is mostly suburban with the main city core on the south side. We have plenty of hills and bluffs. Pinnacle Mountain State Park is visible from quite a few places in the city.

Plenty of pics available on flickr: Flickr: The Little Rock Pool



http://www.law.ualr.edu/publications/lawreview/images/littlerock.jpg (broken link)













All images shamelessly yanked from somewhere else.

Last edited by Stormcrow73; 06-27-2008 at 01:29 PM.. Reason: Added Pics
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