U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > General U.S.
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 06-27-2008, 03:10 PM
 
Location: The land of sugar... previously Houston and Austin
5,429 posts, read 13,183,598 times
Reputation: 3642

Advertisements

Except in some small circles, I would never consider Houston snobby. I doubt whoever said that lives in Houston. Dallas, yes somewhat, but not Houston.

As far as Austin, the problem is that there are so many college grads there already competing for jobs. This is because it has one of the nation's largest universities, and many of them stay in town when they're finished.

I've lived in both Austin and Houston, and I'd go with Houston. Better job opportunities, larger city, and just more stuff to do. If you want that "cool" scene, live near Rice Village, Montrose or Midtown... all just as "hip" or even more hip than Austin overall.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 06-27-2008, 03:15 PM
 
909 posts, read 2,706,218 times
Reputation: 246
...uhhhhhh, cant name any!
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-27-2008, 03:39 PM
 
Location: The land of sugar... previously Houston and Austin
5,429 posts, read 13,183,598 times
Reputation: 3642
Houston tops this list

In Depth: Best Cities For Recent College Grads - Forbes.com
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-27-2008, 04:32 PM
 
Location: Charlotte
12,646 posts, read 13,924,898 times
Reputation: 1679
Quote:
Originally Posted by The_Fairfaxian View Post
Here's my dilemma. For over a year, I have been researching places to move right after I finish college. Even though I have found (or have heard of) cities that are filled with college grads building their careers and meeting people in the process, many of these places have a reputation of being very snobbish, rude, materialistic and cliquey, with guys with massive a-type egos and women with even more massive attitudes. Examples are such as San Diego, Los Angeles, and almost every major Northeastern city (DC through Boston). The lesser problem are cities that have a reputation of being nice and respectful but are hard to meet people not because of arrogance nor cliquishness, but because of a introverted social atmosphere. Examples are such as Seattle and Minneapolis. I really hope this isn't the case with those cities, because otherwise, those cities really appeal to a lot of things I like and believe in (from the topography to the social climate). But in any case, are there any cities that have a good college graduate population yet don't have the snobbish, rude, cutthroat and cliquish environment? A place where there are plenty of young individuals who are educated and motivated, but are laid-back and willing to meet new people.
Charlotte!! Great people and atmosphere. Just nice folks period!! Growing city, great housing and food, the mountains for snow, and the beach for sun.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-28-2008, 12:21 AM
 
433 posts, read 2,173,337 times
Reputation: 312
I have to go with Sacramento. We will forever be in the shadow of the Bay Area snobs/elites. Fast growth. 2 million people. Relatively affordable. Unpretentious.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-28-2008, 12:22 PM
 
Location: Various
11 posts, read 61,160 times
Reputation: 12
Sounds like a "second city" would be the best fit. You don't want a super-populous metro.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-28-2008, 04:33 PM
 
Location: U.S.A.
283 posts, read 1,174,715 times
Reputation: 154
Recent magazine articles . . .

http://www.forbes.com/2008/06/26/cities-grads-best-forbeslife-cx_ae_0626realestate.html (broken link)

Kiplinger's Best Cities - Best Places to Live, Smartest Cities for Your Future

Houston, we have no problems. - By Daniel Gross - Slate Magazine

Last edited by Eastender67; 06-28-2008 at 04:39 PM.. Reason: Edit 1st web site
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-28-2008, 10:02 PM
 
2,502 posts, read 8,053,442 times
Reputation: 885
Chicago is extremely type-A and very high-stress. It has everything else, but not the relaxed atmosphere. Honestly, none of the largest cities will really be relaxed at all. Too many uptight workaholic executives. So scratch off the typical NYC/Boston/Philly/Chicago/DC/etc. if having a non-type-A experience is important to you.

I'll second Portland, Austin, Knoxville, Charlotte, Omaha, etc. Smaller cities.

Minneapolis could be an okay fit. The only complaint I hear from a lot of transplants is that it can be REALLY hard to break into social cirlces if you're not from the area. It isn't a very transient city, so outsiders often have a tricky time fitting in. And since the accent is so strong, people will know right away if you're not from around town.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-29-2008, 06:54 AM
 
508 posts, read 1,317,922 times
Reputation: 336
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kingsnkali View Post
I have to go with Sacramento. We will forever be in the shadow of the Bay Area snobs/elites. Fast growth. 2 million people. Relatively affordable. Unpretentious.
Altough I have never been, Sacramento looks to be the bargain city of Cali and on better terms than some of the other valley cities. I imagine that would be a good place for someone with a limited budget wanting to small taste of what Cali offers in the surrounding regions. Heck, being relatively close to the Sierra Nev makes puts it on the map of potentials in my book.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-30-2008, 09:12 AM
 
804 posts, read 1,737,796 times
Reputation: 458
Default Not Austin

In recent years Austin has seen a massive influx from Dallas and LA, bringing more of the very traits you listed. Those who are not A-types or materialistic, are still snooty/cliquish.

Another consideration is the type of occupation or industry you'll be working in. Competition for jobs here is pretty harsh, and many employers only want entry level or local college grads. It's been labeled the most expensive part of the state, but has the lowest wages of the 4 major cities in TX.

Last edited by nomore07; 06-30-2008 at 09:21 AM..
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > General U.S.
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2019, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top