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Old 06-26-2008, 08:26 PM
 
Location: San Francisco
334 posts, read 1,180,491 times
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Is St. Paul a suburb of Minneapolis, Is Ft. Worth a suburb of Dallas, Are Orange County and the Inland Empire suburbs of L.A., Are San Jose and Oakland suburbs of San Francisco, Ft. Lauderdale of Miami, and St. Pete's of Tampa, or are all these seperate cities
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Old 06-26-2008, 08:45 PM
 
Location: Twin Cities, Minnesota
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They're all separate cities except for Orange County and the Inland Empire. They are suburbs.
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Old 06-26-2008, 10:45 PM
 
Location: Both coasts
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those cities listed are prominent & can survive on their own, but strictly because of geographical ties, they function as "suburbs" imo..in that residents of the less dominant satellite cities are likely to work/ play in the bigger neighboring cities, plus area researchers & the media often lumps these places into single "metro markets". They may not be "suburban" in nature or even more built-up in parts (I think St.Petersburg, FL's population density is greater than Tampa for example) but they are "suburban" to the more dominant city they surround. There is contiguous urban/ suburban development between all these cities- I think if there was a significant rural chunk separating them than my opinion will differ. Like the rural chunk between Orlando & Tampa separates both regions- for now at least, when many many towns develop between them to form non-stop development than Tampa can be considered an Orlando suburb.
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Old 06-26-2008, 10:56 PM
 
Location: Chicagoland
4,028 posts, read 6,405,420 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CubsGiantsIndiansfan2008 View Post
Is St. Paul a suburb of Minneapolis, Is Ft. Worth a suburb of Dallas, Are Orange County and the Inland Empire suburbs of L.A., Are San Jose and Oakland suburbs of San Francisco, Ft. Lauderdale of Miami, and St. Pete's of Tampa, or are all these seperate cities
I think of St. Paul and Minneapolis as separate cities. Even though Fort Worth is big and has all of the necessary commodities I consider it somewhat of a suburb. Orange County and the Inland Empire are suburbs even though Anaheim and Riverside are big cities but not like Fort Worth. San Jose just Isn't a big name Oakland however I would put on the same level as Fort Worth as kind of a suburb. I'm not sure about Ft. Lauderdale and St. Petersburg.
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Old 06-27-2008, 12:27 AM
 
Location: still in exile......
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I wouldn't consider Ft.Lauderdale a Suburb, it has it's own airport(2 actually), and ITSELF it has suburbs(Hollywood, Pompano Beach, Oakland Park, etc.) I would consider it a seperate city. I consider anything between Homestead and Jupiter part of the Miami-Ft.Lauderdale-West Palm Beach metro area/megalopolis

Last edited by dxiweodwo; 06-27-2008 at 12:30 AM.. Reason: added info
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Old 06-29-2008, 10:21 PM
 
5,772 posts, read 13,744,103 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dxiweodwo View Post
I wouldn't consider Ft.Lauderdale a Suburb, it has it's own airport(2 actually), and ITSELF it has suburbs(Hollywood, Pompano Beach, Oakland Park, etc.) I would consider it a seperate city. I consider anything between Homestead and Jupiter part of the Miami-Ft.Lauderdale-West Palm Beach metro area/megalopolis
I'd attach more importance to the fact that Ft. Laud. has its own airport than the fact that it has its own suburbs. Even then, you'd need to look closely at the relationships between Ft. L. and Miami, how many people commute between the two cities, and in which direction, etc., plus consider the question of whether the Ft. L. airport is really that city's own airport or more of a second field for the Miami area, built because Miami Intl. started to exceed its capacity. Still, I'd say that having its own airport has a better possiblity of indicating that Ft. L. is an independent city than having its own suburbs. Large metro areas have become such complex places that plenty of cities that are not their metros' principal cities function as service and commercial centers for their local sections of their metros, and in effect have their own suburbs. The Census Bureau now even lists "metropolitan divisions" within large metro areas (2.5 million-plus), which are essentially smaller metros within larger metros.

I do agree that Dixie is onto something with the fact that Ft. L. shows indications of functioning as its own city. I might consider differences in population between a metro area's principal and second cities as a factor if the disparity is very large (which is one reason I might consider Anaheim more of a suburb than the other second cities listed in the original post), but I see the second city's status as being determined more by function than population as compared to the first city's population. If the second city has the varied economy, the population, and the collection of services and facilities (e.g., like Fort Lauderdale, San Jose and Oakland have their own airports, maybe not as busy as SFO, but full-service airports nonetheless) to function as independent large cities, they really are independent twin cities rather than suburbs.

I would also look at commuting patterns. I would consider both the percentage of the second city's population that commutes to the principal city and how much travel there is between the two cities in both directions, as well as the importance of the second city as a commuting/shopping/entertainment destination for people from throughout the metro area. I'll leave it to the professional urban geographers to determine the precise numbers that would make a city qualify as independent, but these are the factors I would consider.
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Old 06-30-2008, 01:53 AM
 
Location: yeah
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cities
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Old 07-19-2008, 08:05 PM
 
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Orange County and Inland Empire would be edge cities since they are also major job centers. San Jose contains more people than San Francisco and employs more people too. So in California, there is the edge city developing.
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Old 07-20-2008, 06:59 PM
 
Location: dfw, tx
212 posts, read 508,357 times
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ft worth is it own city with its own really big subrbs i.e arlington 350k+.
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