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Old 01-26-2011, 12:25 AM
 
Location: Cleveland, Ohio
1,372 posts, read 2,794,620 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dxiweodwo View Post
oh yeah

Las Vegas is at 2,001 feet in elevation

Pittsburgh is at 1,223 feet in elevation

Pittsburgh would not qualify in this thread. The OP stated "cities with a population over 500,000" ( NOT MSA ) Pittsburgh has a population that is significantly less than 500,000

Pittsburgh - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

In 2009, the city limits held 311,647 residents
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Old 01-26-2011, 06:18 AM
 
3,644 posts, read 9,003,989 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by northbound74 View Post
1000 feet isn't much, when you consider that Kansas City, Oklahoma City, and Omaha all are around 1000 feet. No mountains here.
True, if the land is flat and there aren't many mountains around then high elevation isn't really noticeable.
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Old 01-26-2011, 06:42 AM
 
Location: Virginia Highland, GA
1,939 posts, read 3,984,409 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by northbound74 View Post
1000 feet isn't much, when you consider that Kansas City, Oklahoma City, and Omaha all are around 1000 feet. No mountains here.

Those are the Great Plains with the topography flat as a pancake.
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Old 01-26-2011, 06:45 AM
 
Location: Virginia Highland, GA
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My elevation where I live in the Virginia Highland area of Atlanta is 1183 and that is inside the city limits.
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Old 01-26-2011, 10:49 AM
 
3,644 posts, read 9,003,989 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by brent6969 View Post
Those are the Great Plains with the topography flat as a pancake.
actually KC is hilly. Maybe you shouldn't make assumptions about places you've never been.
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Old 01-26-2011, 11:23 AM
 
1,495 posts, read 1,947,888 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Smtchll View Post
True, if the land is flat and there aren't many mountains around then high elevation isn't really noticeable.
High elevation is not just about mountain views, it also involves brighter sunshine, bluer skies, and brighter stars. But at only 1000 feet these things may not be so obvious.
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Old 01-26-2011, 11:29 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Smtchll View Post
actually KC is hilly. Maybe you shouldn't make assumptions about places you've never been.
True. Illinois is flatter than any of the Plains states. If you want to apply the "flat farmland" stereotype, apply it here.

The Plains just look flatter due to having fewer trees. Also the slope of those states can be incredibly gradual, but it's definitely there.
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Old 01-26-2011, 03:06 PM
 
Location: Appalachian New York, Formerly Louisiana
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Quote:
Originally Posted by northbound74 View Post
1000 feet isn't much, when you consider that Kansas City, Oklahoma City, and Omaha all are around 1000 feet. No mountains here.
Unless it's a carved plateau like the Allegheny or Cumberland. Then 1000 ft. starts to look pretty big because you are seeing it at or below sea level in deep valleys.

A significant portion of the Appalachian plateaus run from 800-2000 feet. Most of WV contains 1200 foot hills. The numbers may not sound like much, but once you see them it's a whole new ball game.

1000 feet can be a lot.

The great plains are wavy rather than hilly in my opinion. Rising up gently where as hilly would imply steeper rises. I'd say Kansas kind of resembles the Piedmont.
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Old 01-29-2011, 12:41 PM
 
Location: The canyon (with my pistols and knife)
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The Piedmont is a bit more dissected than the Great Plains.
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Old 01-29-2011, 12:56 PM
 
Location: Appalachian New York, Formerly Louisiana
4,099 posts, read 4,737,517 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Gnutella View Post
The Piedmont is a bit more dissected than the Great Plains.
This is true, but the Piedmont is a lot lower and wavier than the western plateaus. And if you get around the northern plains with the black hills and such it looks more like where I mean.
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