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Old 01-29-2011, 06:02 PM
 
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Apologies if this has already been covered...

But Albuquerque, NM technically has the highest altitiude in the U.S., with its mountain tops (inside the city limits) taller than Denver. Los Angeles would be #3 with these parameters.
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Old 01-29-2011, 09:55 PM
 
Location: East of the Sun, West of the Moon
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Much of Albuquerque's residential areas are at or above a mile. If you count the Sandia mountains, yeah, Albuquerque is nearly 2 miles above sea level ;-)
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Old 01-30-2011, 04:11 PM
 
Location: In San Antonio
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Denver people. The mile high city.
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Old 03-31-2011, 03:26 AM
 
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1 - denver
2 - albuquerque
3 - el paso
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Old 03-31-2011, 03:42 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ABQConvict View Post
Much of Albuquerque's residential areas are at or above a mile. If you count the Sandia mountains, yeah, Albuquerque is nearly 2 miles above sea level ;-)
This exactly. People in the NE Heights and foothills, maybe even on the West Mesa are over a mile.
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Old 03-31-2011, 04:03 AM
 
Location: Colorado
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I always enjoy a meal atop Sandia at over 10,000 ft elevetion when I'm in Albuquerque.
High Finance Restaurant Overlooking Albuquerque, NM: Top of the Tram .
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Old 05-18-2011, 07:06 PM
 
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Large cities (city limits over 400k or metro over 1 million):

Colorado Springs (city: 416k) is the highest city over 400,000 in the US, with downtown right at 6,000 feet and a few northern neighborhoods reaching 7,000.

Denver - A few suburban areas (the south end of the metro and fringes right at the foothills) are right around 6000 feet. Downtown is famously right at a mile high. All of the metro save for the Brighton area is over 5,000 feet.

Albuquerque - The neighborhoods right against the Sandia Mountains reach 6,200 feet. Downtown is a hair under 5,000 but is one of the lowest parts of the city. Most of the city is between those two elevations, save the southern riverside sprawl which is lower.

Salt Lake City - Foothill fringes can hit the mile mark. Most of the metro gradually rises from the 4,200 foot range in the north (and city proper) to the low 4,500s in the south.

Las Vegas - Western areas can be over 3,000 feet. The Strip area is around 2,300 feet, and eastern areas are below 2,000 feet.

Tucson - Foothill areas to the north reach 3,000 feet. Most of the city ranges from 2,700 feet to around 2,400 feet at the Santa Cruz River.

A slightly smaller city is Reno, which sits in a valley at about the 4,500 foot mark, but with western areas reaching over 5,000 feet.

Downtown Flagstaff is around 6,900 feet while central Santa Fe is literally on the 7,000 contour. However, most of Santa Fe is lower than downtown while Flagstaff's neighborhoods are similar in height to downtown.

(The highest town overall in the US is Leadville, CO, 2,600 people sitting over 10,000 feet up in the headwaters of the Arkansas River.)

Lastly, I'll mention the highest college town in the country: Laramie, Wyoming. Just shy of 30,000, downtown is at 7,200 with the campus slightly higher.
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Old 05-19-2011, 03:53 PM
 
Location: Phoenix
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Albuquerque is located about 5000ft. Just because there is a mountain range near-bye doesn't mean anything. Its at 5000feet.
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Old 05-19-2011, 04:56 PM
 
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I live in a suburb of SLC in the foothills, and I'm at 5250'. There are residential neighborhoods up to about 6300' in the 'burbs south and north of SLC. They are outside city metro limits, but there are large population areas in the canyons also.
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Old 05-20-2011, 10:21 AM
 
Location: The Springs
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Colorado Springs:
Elevation: 6035 feet
Pop: 416,427 (city), 645,613 (metro)
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