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Old 09-19-2008, 10:03 PM
 
Location: Richmond
395 posts, read 400,944 times
Reputation: 63

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Quote:
Originally Posted by BP300 View Post
I probably will get blasted for saying this, but I have found that people that are more educated and of higher socioeconomic levels have minimal or no Southern accents. I am speaking of both native Southerners and transplants. Furthermore, in a professional, corporate white-collar environment, very few people have the Southern accent. Blue-collar people, however, have a higher tendency to have a thick Southern draw which can be almost impossible for me (a native Northerner) to understand. I apologize if I have offended anyone, but this is just my personal experience.
I disagree. A Southern drawl is the mark of being an Aristocrat. A Southern twang is blue collar. Varies of course on which regional Southern accent is used. Northern accents are often unpleaseant to the ears (no offense)
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Old 09-19-2008, 10:05 PM
 
Location: Murfreesboro, TN
3,528 posts, read 7,327,342 times
Reputation: 1124
Quote:
Originally Posted by blueva View Post
I disagree. A Southern drawl is the mark of being an Aristocrat. A Southern twang is blue collar. Varies of course on which regional Southern accent is used. Northern accents are often unpleaseant to the ears (no offense)
Blueva - You are absolutely right. I never even thought about it!
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Old 09-20-2008, 10:10 AM
 
Location: Nashville, Tn
7,916 posts, read 16,806,965 times
Reputation: 5454
I really dislike the sterotyping of people and classifying someone as ignorant or uneducated based on a regional accent. People with any particular accent can sound stupid if they say something stupid. I've heard people with southern accents that have a certain refined quality. Bill Clinton obviously has a southern accent and whether you like him or not he's a brilliant orator. John Edwards has a much stronger accent and he's also a gifted speaker. It's just ridiculous to suggest that a southern accent identifies someone as an uneducated loser. The regional accents of Bill Clinton or Lyndon Johnson certainly didn't prevent them from becoming the President of the United States.
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Old 09-20-2008, 04:11 PM
 
Location: Murfreesboro, TN
3,528 posts, read 7,327,342 times
Reputation: 1124
Quote:
Originally Posted by MontanaGuy View Post
I really dislike the sterotyping of people and classifying someone as ignorant or uneducated based on a regional accent. People with any particular accent can sound stupid if they say something stupid. I've heard people with southern accents that have a certain refined quality. Bill Clinton obviously has a southern accent and whether you like him or not he's a brilliant orator. John Edwards has a much stronger accent and he's also a gifted speaker. It's just ridiculous to suggest that a southern accent identifies someone as an uneducated loser. The regional accents of Bill Clinton or Lyndon Johnson certainly didn't prevent them from becoming the President of the United States.
You make an excellent point! I never really thought about accents and their perceptions.
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Old 09-20-2008, 04:15 PM
 
Location: Richmond
395 posts, read 400,944 times
Reputation: 63
Quote:
Originally Posted by MontanaGuy View Post
I really dislike the sterotyping of people and classifying someone as ignorant or uneducated based on a regional accent. People with any particular accent can sound stupid if they say something stupid. I've heard people with southern accents that have a certain refined quality. Bill Clinton obviously has a southern accent and whether you like him or not he's a brilliant orator. John Edwards has a much stronger accent and he's also a gifted speaker. It's just ridiculous to suggest that a southern accent identifies someone as an uneducated loser. The regional accents of Bill Clinton or Lyndon Johnson certainly didn't prevent them from becoming the President of the United States.
I love Jimmy Carter's Gulf Coastal Plain- Georgian accent. But I dont like Bill Clinton and I ESPECIALLY dont like John Edwards. He sounds like a used car dealer or something. I think its more personality maybe. It grates on my ears. I wonder if Edwards is even putting it on at times. To sound more "country" and "down home"


I also love Sr. John Warner (THE OLD ONE) his accent- is very Old Virginia Tidewater, even though he grew up in DC, Well NOVA had the similar type of accent. They lost it now.
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Old 09-21-2008, 09:52 AM
 
Location: Nashville, Tn
7,916 posts, read 16,806,965 times
Reputation: 5454
blueva wrote:
Quote:
I wonder if Edwards is even putting it on at times. To sound more "country" and "down home"
I've heard other people say the same thing and it does strike me as something that he's intentionally modified to create a particular image of himself. Still, he is an excellent public speaker.
I hope no one will take this wrong but even though I stated earlier that I didn't like to stereotype people and categorize them by their accent there are many black men in the south whose accents and manner of speaking are so strong that it really would present a problem with employment, particularly in corporations or positions that require strong verbal skills. I've watched a few episodes of 48 Hours on tv and I recall a number of times when they had to subtitle what young black men were saying because it was unintelligible. Please don't take that as any sort of racial slur or expression of disrespect, I don't have a racist bone in my body and I'm going to vote for Obama. I'm just pointing out that the ability to communicate is a key element in any successful career and if an accent and speech patterns and mannerisms aren't recognizable as the english language it's going to be very detrimental in terms of career and economic well being.

Last edited by MontanaGuy; 09-21-2008 at 10:00 AM..
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Old 09-21-2008, 11:50 AM
 
177 posts, read 564,468 times
Reputation: 125
Quote:
Originally Posted by MontanaGuy View Post
...Here's my theory about it, I'm thinking that the bigger cities in the South like Nashville have many newcomers like myself who make up a significant population and that a young person growing up in a bigger city who's exposed to various accents might tend to have a less pronounced southern accent than someone who grows up in a small community. Anyway, I may be totally wrong about it but I'm just curious about why people who are raised in the same state can have such different accents.
I think you're dead on. Growing up in Murfreesboro, both of my parents worked at MTSU. There were so many people from different states and countries that I saw everytime I went to the campus with my folks. When I entered highschool, my friends and I were into more of an "east coast" style. Especially the hip-hop music we listened to. While other people were more into the "West Coast" California, Tupac style. But on top of all of this, there was a Southern style that was universal. By the time I entered college, most of my friends were from places like Baltimore, Chicago, Brooklyn, Philladelphia, Toronto... so needless to say, my southern accent is pratically gone! People here think I'm from up north. But, when I visit my family in Hartford, they tell me even though they don't hear the harsh southern accent they're looking for, it slips every now and then. When I don't even notice. I still say "ya'll" and blend certain pairs of words. But that's a cool thing I've noticed too is that Mid-TN does have a "Southern" accent, but it's not what you would think. It's (in some cases) milder, yet jumbled with all of these East Cost, West Coast, and Mid West influences. I don't think I could tell you what a Southern Tennesse accent sounds like. It varies among very short distances. But I do believe the educational institutions like Vanderbilt, Belmont, MTSU, TSU, etc and the people they draw from all over the country/world make an impression upon the dialect of the region. That's just my take on it.
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Old 09-21-2008, 12:08 PM
 
177 posts, read 564,468 times
Reputation: 125
Quote:
Originally Posted by MontanaGuy View Post
blueva wrote:

...I hope no one will take this wrong but even though I stated earlier that I didn't like to stereotype people and categorize them by their accent there are many black men in the south whose accents and manner of speaking are so strong that it really would present a problem with employment, particularly in corporations or positions that require strong verbal skills. I've watched a few episodes of 48 Hours on tv and I recall a number of times when they had to subtitle what young black men were saying because it was unintelligible. Please don't take that as any sort of racial slur or expression of disrespect, I don't have a racist bone in my body and I'm going to vote for Obama. I'm just pointing out that the ability to communicate is a key element in any successful career and if an accent and speech patterns and mannerisms aren't recognizable as the english language it's going to be very detrimental in terms of career and economic well being.
As an African American, I don't take what you said the wrong way. You're stating a fact. Whether some would admit it or not. But this is just the symptom of the many "different" Americas that exist in "America". In their neck of the woods, if you come talking that "intelligible" talk, you will be marked as a target. The way in which you speak shows you don't know the the way of the area. That's why many of us consider ourselves "bilingual". When we're in the hood, we can speak the language. But for us who have to navigate the office, we have to be able to speak that language too. The guys you see on 48 hours have absolutely no intention of coming to "the office". Just like the people in the office have no intention of going to "the hood". It's the same for a lot of white people in the deep rural areas. Ever watched "My Redneck Wedding" on CMT? Wow, that's where you defintely need some subtitles. But it's all about areas. It's funny how when I go to Hartford, the slang they use shows I'm not from there because I don't understand it. Same with Memphis, Atlanta, Brooklyn, wherever. In my eyes it all depends on what you're trying to do and where you're trying to go. If you want to make it in the corporate world YOU MUST learn to speak well and dress a certain way. Or you won't work, unless you have money already. It's the status quo. But I think people (not saying you) are very quick to associate "incorrect speech" with a lack of intelligence when a lot of times it's anything but. Some of those "drug dealers" are some of the smartest business men and women you'll ever meet. They just took the wrong path. And after graduating from college, I'm convinced that some of the dumbest people I've ever met are the best speaking and dressed people. They've learned how to look the part. And sadly, sometimes that's enough.
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Old 09-23-2008, 11:53 AM
 
Location: Western Kentucky
42 posts, read 98,198 times
Reputation: 22
I'm from northwest Kentucky (right on the river of KY,IN) and I used to not have much of a southern accent at all since I went to highschool in IN but ever since I graduated and am spending more time around Kentuckians I'm gettin my accent back. I was watching some old home videos of when I was little and I heard me talk and it was like I was some kid from rural alabama! It was awesome! But it's the same around kentucky, if you go to louisville you wont find near the southern accent as example morgantown KY out in the boonies. If you wanna hear some southern talkin go there! People say that KY isnt southern because we dont have accents but most everybody I know from ky has a distinct southern accent, not as thick as AL, GA, MS but definately still southern. Im sure those people have only been to louisville and theyre basin their judgement just on louisville. But why is KY not considered southern because "we dont have accents" supposedly, but TN is? Ive heard alot of people say kentuckians sound alot like tennesseeans....???
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Old 09-23-2008, 02:15 PM
 
Location: Middle, TN
636 posts, read 1,253,476 times
Reputation: 411
I reckon' I here'd bout all of it, ain't nairy one of 'em speaks ''just alike''.

There, now yall here'd me tawk.

I try to type as it would be in a newspaper ( right as I know how to ), but talk totaly different, Im meself when I tawk..
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