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View Poll Results: What city will continue to attract more and more people?
New York 23 23.23%
Houston 27 27.27%
Atlanta 10 10.10%
Las Vegas 5 5.05%
Mesa, AZ 1 1.01%
Nashville, TN 3 3.03%
Santa Fe, NM 0 0%
Phoenix, AZ 7 7.07%
Glendale, CA 1 1.01%
Henderson, NV 0 0%
Austin, TX 11 11.11%
San Antonio, TX 3 3.03%
Chandler, AZ 1 1.01%
Charlotte, NC 5 5.05%
San Jose, CA 2 2.02%
Voters: 99. You may not vote on this poll

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Old 07-09-2008, 02:14 PM
 
Location: Phoenix metro
20,005 posts, read 69,439,584 times
Reputation: 10115

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Quote:
Originally Posted by thePR View Post
What's with people always saying that Chicago's winters are so much worse than New York's? It's a few degrees colder on average for winter months and even less for the summer.

But like I said before the choices here are strange and somewhat redundant, listing three cities all right by each other.
Let em believe alllllll the crap they want. If people truly think its that cold here, thats good! We already have 9+ million people in the area as it is.
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Old 07-09-2008, 02:33 PM
 
98 posts, read 90,127 times
Reputation: 36
Despite the high costs, New York adds more people (when you add domestically + globally) than all the places mentioned on the polls, or any other US city for that matter.

So, I'm going with New York.
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Old 07-09-2008, 02:55 PM
 
Location: Houston
415 posts, read 391,433 times
Reputation: 41
Quote:
Originally Posted by liberal elite View Post
Despite the high costs, New York adds more people (when you add domestically + globally) than all the places mentioned on the polls, or any other US city for that matter.

So, I'm going with New York.
No it doesn't.

Check here: http://recenter.tamu.edu/data/popm00/

Find New York, then find cities on the list like Houston, Atlanta, Phoenix, etc.
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Old 07-09-2008, 03:01 PM
 
98 posts, read 90,127 times
Reputation: 36
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kofi713 View Post
Yes, it does.

I suppose you (and many others who post on this forum) have difficulty distinguishing the difference between CITY and a METROPOLITAN area, right?

Correct me if I'm wrong, but isn't the title of this thread "What CITY will continue to attract more and more people?"

Well, ahem...

http://img247.imageshack.us/img247/3341/graphyo0.png (broken link)
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Old 07-09-2008, 03:03 PM
 
Location: Houston
415 posts, read 391,433 times
Reputation: 41
Quote:
Originally Posted by liberal elite View Post
Yes, it does.

I suppose you (and many others who post on this forum) have difficulty with the difference between a CITY and a METROPOLITAN area, right?

Here is something I found on this forum earlier.

http://img247.imageshack.us/img247/3341/graphyo0.png (broken link)
Oh okay.

City limits are so irrelevant. If city limits were so important, places like San Francisco and Boston wouldn't be major cities.

Your list also shows nothing about international or domestic migration. Once a city gets as big as NYC, births really do come into play with growth.
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Old 07-09-2008, 03:07 PM
 
Location: East Tennessee and Atlanta
3,691 posts, read 8,782,260 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Steve-o View Post
Let em believe alllllll the crap they want. If people truly think its that cold here, thats good! We already have 9+ million people in the area as it is.
Chicago's much colder "feeling" in winter than NYC. It's those lake-effect winds. They blow hard and cold!! Plus, Chicago's not moderated by being on the ocean, as NYC is. Chicago's on a lake (obviously) and in the middle of the continent practically, meaning much colder weather.
Everyone who's ever visited or lived in both, say hands-down Chicago's an ice box compared to NYC in the winter.
NYC's past 4 or 5 winters have been pretty easy. We've had little snowfall with the exception of 1-2 per winter, and mild days of 60-65 degrees...ugh, climate change is a-comin'.
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Old 07-09-2008, 03:12 PM
 
98 posts, read 90,127 times
Reputation: 36
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kofi713 View Post
Oh okay.

City limits are so irrelevant. If city limits were so important, places like San Francisco and Boston wouldn't be major cities.

Your list also shows nothing about international or domestic migration.
Once a city gets as big as NYC, births really do come into play with growth.
(a) City limits are so irrelevant? Answer: No, they're not.

(b) Research and you will find. I'm not going to waste my time digging up that information.

(c) Oh, please. Births alone are not responsible for New York's growth. If that were the case, Los Angeles and Chicago would have placed #2 and #3 respectively, since they're much larger cities that Phoenix (which comes in at #2). Do people in Los Angeles and Chicago not have babies? Are births an NYC phenomenon?

Explain.
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Old 07-09-2008, 03:16 PM
 
Location: Phoenix metro
20,005 posts, read 69,439,584 times
Reputation: 10115
Quote:
Originally Posted by jjbradleynyc View Post
Chicago's much colder "feeling" in winter than NYC. It's those lake-effect winds. They blow hard and cold!! Plus, Chicago's not moderated by being on the ocean, as NYC is. Chicago's on a lake (obviously) and in the middle of the continent practically, meaning much colder weather.
Everyone who's ever visited or lived in both, say hands-down Chicago's an ice box compared to NYC in the winter.
NYC's past 4 or 5 winters have been pretty easy. We've had little snowfall with the exception of 1-2 per winter, and mild days of 60-65 degrees...ugh, climate change is a-comin'.
ON AVERAGE theyre not that far apart. Sure Chicago gets colder from time to time, but those days arent numerous enough to drastically alter the average temps. In any case, we get a few thaws every year, too. Last winter we hit the mid-60's for a couple of days.
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Old 07-09-2008, 03:18 PM
 
Location: Houston
415 posts, read 391,433 times
Reputation: 41
Quote:
Originally Posted by liberal elite View Post
(a) City limits are so irrelevant? Answer: No, they're not.
Yes they are in certain aspects like growth.

Quote:
(b) Research and you will find. I'm not going to waste my time digging up that information.
Why don't you? You're the one who said it without any links to back it up.

Quote:
(c) Oh, please. Births alone are not responsible for New York's growth. If that were the case, Chicago and Los Angeles would have placed #2 and #3 respectively, since they're much larger cities. Do people in Los Angeles and Chicago not have babies? Are births an NYC phenomenon.
It's births and NYC's international migration. It has the most out of the top ten cities (now I'm just looking at metro areas, but assuming that if you break it down to the city, it'll stay relatively the same). For Chicago, it has relatively low international migration for a place its size, and it is also losing domestically.
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Old 07-09-2008, 03:19 PM
 
Location: Denver
692 posts, read 2,421,422 times
Reputation: 365
Quote:
Let em believe alllllll the crap they want. If people truly think its that cold here, thats good! We already have 9+ million people in the area as it is.
That's the problem not the weather
Many of the old great cities loaded with charm, history and culture
are just to damn crowded for day to day living.
Thats why I see boomers heading south ( for better or worse )
We need our space man. The way I figure it the money one
saves by not living in a high profile megalopolis allows us to visit them
for their virtues without having to deal with the rest.

That's my plan anyway. Living in Seattle now kind of reminds of
Chicago of the 70's with regards to population density.
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