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Old 07-01-2008, 02:10 PM
 
Location: Near L.A.
4,114 posts, read 9,233,285 times
Reputation: 3349

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It can be some place you'd like to return to. It can be some place you're just curious to try out. It can be some place with family. I don't care.

I live in Kentucky but have traveled enough to be confident that I would feel comfortable and more accepted in other places in this nation. That said, here's my list in no particular order of preference:

1. New York, the capital of the world. NYC and its surrounding metropolis of 21,000,000+ residents provides everything one could ever want. Want solitude and tranquility? The park system provides it. Arts? Multiculturalism? Fast and reliable public transportation? Safe neighborhoods? Diverse architecture? A growing economy? NYC far surpasses Chicago, London, L.A., and other world cities in these and many regards! And yet every cultural faction in every borough, each distinct from one another, craft a "melting mosaic," of sorts, larger than any other city.

2. Chicago, b/c I like it for what it is. A lady I met from Chicago put it best once: "Chicago has rural people living in an urban area." Chicago natives can be a little more down to earth than NYers as a generality. The food rocks, hometown pride is unparalleled, Lake Michigan's frontage is very well developed and beautified, and the COL is much cheaper than NYC's. Still very multicultural and, while not as safe overall as NYC, still has some GREAT areas, more so on the north side.

3. San Diego. It seems to have the same "lifestyle-oriented, year-round good-weather, enjoying life vibe" culture that drew millions to L.A. and a natural beauty that rivals San Francisco's. Yet, the COL is cheaper than the other two cities, and people seem a little friendlier and down to earth. Not to mention, the proximity to Mexico is a plus. SD also appears to have more local pride than any other major CA city.

4. Seattle. The only thing that I'm skeptical about is the "Seattle Freeze," but then it is VERY prevalent here in Kentucky even though it doesn't have a name. I've never met somebody from Seattle or WA that I disliked. But, rainforests and the Cascades are less than two hours from the city. Puget Sound, the islands (which I guess are a result of the Juan de Fuca's diversion,) and Lake Washington all make for a scenic setting. There's also no state income tax.

5. Houston. This is a place I would not mind permanently settling in. It has some nice, historic and walkable neighborhoods, contrary to popular belief. It is gradually expanding its public trans. rail network. It is close to a good day trip to Galveston. It has a phenomenal job market. It has the world's tallest skyscraper outside of a central business district and America's third largest museum district. It has...everything Chicago offers at only 2/5 the cost!

6. Fort Worth. No, it's not some little hokey-pokey yee-haw cowtown anymore. That would be Abilene (okay, just kidding!) For real, it has some cool things at Sundance Square, the Kimball Art Museum, and the Stockyards. An island in the Trinity River is about to be redeveloped into a second downtown/lifestyle center, of sorts, for FTW. It has all of the amenities and nightlife of Dallas, without as much sprawl and as many snooty people. Love this city!

7. Atlanta...if it can ever get its crime rate down! Virginia-Highlands, Little Five Points, and Decatur (a separate city) are all still great places for young professionals and college students to live. ATL is a very bikeable city and with MARTA I feasibly wouldn't have to own a car. (I didn't mention Buckhead b/c I don't think I would feel comfortable there.)

8. Oxford, MS. Now here's a huge jump, from huge cities to po-dunk. Ole Miss is a great institution of higher learning with a gorgeous campus. Downtown is very quaint yet vibrant with locals and other ethnicities alike. The crime rate is almost zero. It's still close to Memphis, Birmingham, and Nashville. Non-Mississippians are always surprised to find out just how pretty the state is; I know I was until I visited.

9. Laramie, WY. A kind of western Oxford, without the infamous tailgating in the Quad. Laramie is a place with a surprisingly strong arts scene. The mountains and plains around the city would make one a fool for not taking advantage of the outdoors. It's not suffering from the sprawl of Colorado, and yet it's only two hours from Denver. Wyoming is as a rule a breathtakingly beautiful state!

That's all for now, ya'll!
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Old 07-01-2008, 02:23 PM
 
Location: Phoenix metro
20,005 posts, read 69,429,074 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jcm1986 View Post
Diverse architecture? A growing economy? NYC far surpasses Chicago
Uhhhh, Chicago usually ranks well over NYC in terms of diverse architecture and is about equal when it comes to economy. Chicago's architecture is known worldwide and our economy is the most diverse in the country and we also lead the way with most corporate relocation and expansion projects. Just thought Id toss that out there.
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Old 07-01-2008, 02:33 PM
 
Location: South Florida
1,015 posts, read 1,943,739 times
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I love small, quaint towns, also the mountains, four seasons, rural areas - so my tops are Colorado, Maine, New Hampshire, Vermont, upstate New York, North Carolina.
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Old 07-01-2008, 02:37 PM
 
Location: Ca2Mo2Ga2Va!
2,736 posts, read 5,954,612 times
Reputation: 1788
What? No Omaha? Just kidding folks!

Grew up in San Diego and left when I was 34! Was ready for some REAL weather,lol. Have since lived outside of Springfield, MO, now in north Georgia and getting ready to relocate to Roanoke VA. I've loved all the places I've lived and am axious to see me new surroundings!
Forgot to mention a 4 year stay in 29Palms, CA while my husband was in the Marine Corps.
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Old 07-01-2008, 02:46 PM
 
Location: Near L.A.
4,114 posts, read 9,233,285 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Steve-o View Post
Uhhhh, Chicago usually ranks well over NYC in terms of diverse architecture and is about equal when it comes to economy. Chicago's architecture is known worldwide and our economy is the most diverse in the country and we also lead the way with most corporate relocation and expansion projects. Just thought Id toss that out there.
Chicago and NYC both have architecture that is known worldwide. Chicago has the Sears Tower, John Hancock Tower, Wrigley Field, and soon the Spire. New York has the Brooklyn Bridge, Empire State Building, Chrysler Building, Rockefeller Center, and soon the Freedom Tower.

Both cities rank highly in terms of corporate relocations and expansions. Mind you, Houston and Dallas are blowing Chicago and NYC out of the water right now, but considering... I'll say, Chicago is cheaper to do business in than NYC, that's for sure.

Chicago's economy is the most diverse in the country? Not trying to start a fight, but I'll have to take a look at the Fortune 500 lists before I can agree or disagree with you.

I'm not trying to say anything negative about Chicago here, b/c it does great at what it does: being a world-class, sprawling (up and out), Midwestern-rooted city. NYC offers so much more just by sheer virtue of its size, that's all. Both cities are great.
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Old 07-01-2008, 02:51 PM
 
Location: St Simons Island, GA
23,122 posts, read 35,061,639 times
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Santa Barbara, CA...I would love to live there, for reasons that should be obvious to anyone that's been to that city.
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Old 07-01-2008, 03:18 PM
 
Location: Chicago
3,340 posts, read 8,707,550 times
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ok here's my list in no order

1. Plainview, NE- My Granparents live in a farm up there and I would love to live on that farm but I would also miss a city life too. The town has enough to do the basics such as Grocery Stores, Restaurants, a pool etc. but not much else. Sioux City, IA and Norfolk, NE are close enough and they have more things and Omaha and Sioux Falls are about 2 hours away so theres always that too.

2. Sioux Falls, SD- Right now it's really growing so I would really like to be there and see all that's happening up there, it also just sounds like a nice place to live.

3. Chicago- I would love to live in the Chicago Spire to have a view of the whole City and the Skyline, plus Chicago probably has the best economy in the United States.

4. Minneapolis- Great economy and I've heard it has good schools too, and they have tons of lakes, which I like too.

5. Seattle- Once again, great economy and It sounds like an extremely nice city from what I've heard.
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Old 07-01-2008, 03:23 PM
 
Location: Chicagoland
4,028 posts, read 6,399,967 times
Reputation: 1305
Quote:
Originally Posted by Steve-o View Post
Uhhhh, Chicago usually ranks well over NYC in terms of diverse architecture and is about equal when it comes to economy. Chicago's architecture is known worldwide and our economy is the most diverse in the country and we also lead the way with most corporate relocation and expansion projects. Just thought Id toss that out there.
Yes, just recently they had an review of cities in America and their architecture and Chicago won hands down. It was even in a thread around here.

Quote:
Originally Posted by jcm1986 View Post
2. Chicago, b/c I like it for what it is. A lady I met from Chicago put it best once: "Chicago has rural people living in an urban area." Chicago natives can be a little more down to earth than NYers as a generality. The food rocks, hometown pride is unparalleled, Lake Michigan's frontage is very well developed and beautified, and the COL is much cheaper than NYC's. Still very multicultural and, while not as safe overall as NYC, still has some GREAT areas, more so on the north side.
The safety part I don't agree with, especially after rehabilitation of the CHA.



I would like to travel and live in a few places while I'm young but not permanently settle there because I like the weather and four seasons.

Seattle. I hear a lot about "oh I can't take the gloom" etc. but if it really is like i hear, I would love it there. I would also be close to the rain forest and it is a large city so it can offer me sports and a variety of things to do.

New York City. I want to see, by living it it, how it compares to other cities.

Los Angeles. It would complete me living in the big three cities of America. Of course it can't offer me a white winter.

Chicago. I live right by it but I want to a get a place in Lincoln Park.

Portland. Kind of the same reason as Seattle.

I kind also want to try Astoria, Or because the Oregon coast, from what I've seen, is so amazing.


It would be hard for me to live far away from a BIG city. Hence me only naming one smaller, further away town.
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Old 07-01-2008, 06:36 PM
 
3,326 posts, read 7,753,062 times
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1. Northern Maine, because it's cold.
2. Upper Peninsula of Michigan, because it's cold.
3. Arrowhead of Minnesota, because it's cold.
4. Many places in Alaska, because it's cold.
Cannot function in heat. Now is hibernation time. Must go back to sleep now. See you in winter.
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Old 07-01-2008, 06:45 PM
 
Location: Chicagoland
4,028 posts, read 6,399,967 times
Reputation: 1305
Quote:
Originally Posted by northbound74 View Post
1. Northern Maine, because it's cold.
2. Upper Peninsula of Michigan, because it's cold.
3. Arrowhead of Minnesota, because it's cold.
4. Many places in Alaska, because it's cold.
Cannot function in heat. Now is hibernation time. Must go back to sleep now. See you in winter.
You are the first person I've seen post that would rather live where it gets to be cold over some Sunbelt state. There should be more people who share your views.

I also want to add San Francisco to my list because it is the only city in California that I could live in for a long time.
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