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Old 07-02-2008, 05:35 PM
 
192 posts, read 478,102 times
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After reading the thread on Suburbia with much interest, I wonder how other C-D members feel about the New Urbanism trend.

The work of Jane Jacobs, who was mentioned in that thread, has been used by supporters of New Urbanism and Traditional Neighborhood Design (TND).

Links to TND and New Urban Neighborhoods

After living in a nineteenth century city neighborhood in Providence for years, my husband and I recently relocated to Charleston. We were hoping to find something similar to what we left, which was a walkable, tight-knit community of 100+ year old small homes and local businesses. We had a tough time with that, because the historic sections of Charleston are prohibitively expensive for us at this point.

We were uncomfortable with the thought of moving to a typical car-centered suburban development, and wanted more of a "neighborhood" than a subdivision, if that makes sense. We ended up settling in a new urban-like community, and love it so far.

From the outside, it does have a master-planned and slightly cookie-cutterish feel to it, but a closer look shows that it's not so different from the historic neighborhood we left in RI. We are able to walk to the market, independent restaurants, and locally-owned shops. Parks are everywhere, and the streets are built on a human (walkable) scale. Lots are small, so neighbors get to know one another easily. And the home styles follow the Charleston vernacular, adding a timeless feel to the area.

If it weren't so clean, it would be hard to believe that there isn't a building here under 10 years old. And, unlike in my old neighborhood, I don't think I'll have to deal with any robberies.

So, are master-planned New Urbanist neighborhoods as upsetting to folks as standard spaghetti street subdivisions? Did I drink some kool-aid along the way that has made me forget my formerly urban bias?
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Old 07-02-2008, 05:50 PM
 
Location: Fort Worth/Dallas
11,879 posts, read 32,682,363 times
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I think the new focus on creating urban neighborhoods is a good idea. I for one HATE driving, always have; and it's more healthy to be able to walk to where you shop and if you go out to eat, that as well.
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Old 07-02-2008, 05:55 PM
 
Location: SF Bay Area
15,242 posts, read 23,989,943 times
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There was another thread about this too, so you can get some insight from it: http://www.city-data.com/forum/gener...-urbanism.html
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Old 07-02-2008, 06:14 PM
 
192 posts, read 478,102 times
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Oops!--sorry for starting a duplicate topic. I should have done a search first.

bad poster...bad poster...
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Old 07-08-2008, 11:00 PM
 
Location: Macao
15,484 posts, read 34,156,968 times
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Where is this at?

I've lived in Europe, Asia and South America for years... all of which are VERY WALKABLE and people-oriented.

I've heard about 'urbanism' in the States before...but whenever I look at photos of them, they still seem to seriously lack something.
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Old 07-08-2008, 11:42 PM
 
Location: Bronx, NY
2,806 posts, read 14,875,143 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Tiger Beer View Post
Where is this at?

I've lived in Europe, Asia and South America for years... all of which are VERY WALKABLE and people-oriented.

I've heard about 'urbanism' in the States before...but whenever I look at photos of them, they still seem to seriously lack something.
For all of their faults, the new urbanist developments seem to be a million times better than your average subdivision.

That being said I'll take a regular urban neighborhood over a new urban neighborhood any day of the week.
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