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Old 03-06-2010, 03:15 PM
 
Location: NYC
1,158 posts, read 3,207,959 times
Reputation: 1080

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I'm originally from the East Coast and there are a ton of things I enjoy more about the West. I think the food is better here, the natural scenery is more stunning and varied, and I really enjoy California's micro-climates (you can choose to visit snow if you want, or just totally avoid it if you don't feel like dealing with it).

The one thing I definitely miss about the East is the way real city living is fully embraced there, ie taking public transportation and walking everywhere. You do get that to a certain degree in San Francisco, but outside of the most central neighborhoods, people still drive. Go on Yelp and read reviews of the Asian Art Museum, located in downtown SF only 1-2 blocks from both a BART and Muni station; people STILL complain about a lack of parking at the museum. Hello people, take public transit! By contrast, look up MoMa in NYC and you won't find any Yelp reviews even mention the word "parking".

I still love San Francisco, I think it's one of the best cities in the country and it's definitely the best on the West Coast as far as I'm concerned. As has been discussed here before, the physical city itself is extremely urban and is definitely in the league of (and arguably above) Chicago/Boston/DC. It's just that people on the West Coast don't seem to fully embrace urban living to the degree that it's embraced on the East Coast. I think it goes back to people here wanting to maintain some sort of connection to nature, rather than completely surrendering to the concrete jungle. And that's fine. In fact, it's one of San Francisco's biggest charms - the fact that you have this dense, cosmopolitan, urban paradise with such wonderful natural scenery so close by.
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Old 03-06-2010, 04:48 PM
 
Location: Soon to be Southlake, TX
648 posts, read 1,416,726 times
Reputation: 379
Quote:
Originally Posted by matt345 View Post
I'm originally from the East Coast and there are a ton of things I enjoy more about the West. I think the food is better here, the natural scenery is more stunning and varied, and I really enjoy California's micro-climates (you can choose to visit snow if you want, or just totally avoid it if you don't feel like dealing with it).

The one thing I definitely miss about the East is the way real city living is fully embraced there, ie taking public transportation and walking everywhere. You do get that to a certain degree in San Francisco, but outside of the most central neighborhoods, people still drive. Go on Yelp and read reviews of the Asian Art Museum, located in downtown SF only 1-2 blocks from both a BART and Muni station; people STILL complain about a lack of parking at the museum. Hello people, take public transit! By contrast, look up MoMa in NYC and you won't find any Yelp reviews even mention the word "parking".

I still love San Francisco, I think it's one of the best cities in the country and it's definitely the best on the West Coast as far as I'm concerned. As has been discussed here before, the physical city itself is extremely urban and is definitely in the league of (and arguably above) Chicago/Boston/DC. It's just that people on the West Coast don't seem to fully embrace urban living to the degree that it's embraced on the East Coast. I think it goes back to people here wanting to maintain some sort of connection to nature, rather than completely surrendering to the concrete jungle. And that's fine. In fact, it's one of San Francisco's biggest charms - the fact that you have this dense, cosmopolitan, urban paradise with such wonderful natural scenery so close by.
I agree with most of that, but not the food. Not only do you get the authentic world cuisine in cities like New York, Boston, and DC, but you get the specialties of the region: pizza, cheese steaks, lobster, clam chowder, and chicken wings, as I mentioned earlier. I do not think the West Coast is really known for any famous regional specialties that really are as famous as chicken wings, pizza, or cheese steaks.

I think San Francisco is a perfect city. It is a perfect blend of East Coast density and West Coast scenery. It is for people who really want both. That is what I envy about it. If NYC had San Francisco's hills, imagine what that would look like.
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Old 03-06-2010, 09:11 PM
 
Location: northern Vermont - previously NM, WA, & MA
9,423 posts, read 18,320,690 times
Reputation: 11902
I find it bizarre that one would miss fast food on eather coast. To counterpoint, I live in Massachusetts and use to live in Seattle. I MISS GOOD COFFEE!!!! All they have here is Dunkin Donuts (yakk!!) and I get happy when I see the occasional Starbucks which ironicly I never went to in Seattle because of the plethora of fabulous coffee shops they had out there. Dunkin Donuts and diner coffee here in Mass is just putrid!
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Old 03-08-2010, 01:38 PM
 
532 posts, read 1,102,167 times
Reputation: 502
Quote:
Originally Posted by DBensteel View Post
I agree with Vegaspilgrim, there is really nothing to envy about the east. After moving to the west coast for college, I never wanted to return East. True, it does have more history, but thats about it. Rude, arrogant, New Yorkers are about the worst type of people in the world, and I find it impossible to stomach the domineering and self-centered attitudes of the whole population of the northeast. The west, in contrast, has higher culture, nicer people, better weather, all in a much more beautiful setting.
Interesting observation. I bet I could get on the subway right now and ask just aboiut any complete stranger for help, regardless of race or origin and practically get the shirt off their back. The other day I was on the platform standing next to a guy in a suit giving directions to an african man who spoke poor english but had directions written on a piece of paper. The man had trouble understanding so he walked him to the right platform and pointed to the right letter of the train until the visitor understood. I see stuff like that all the time.

I believe many people come to NY and put up a facade because they feel that's what they're supposed to do. Instead what happens is NYers BS detector goes off and they shut you down. I have found NYers to be refreshingly honest and straightforward. As long as you treat them with honesty and candor.

I do miss the West Coast Palm Trees, mountains and canyons. Also good mexican food!
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