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Old 07-10-2008, 08:27 PM
 
Location: USA
2,779 posts, read 6,691,912 times
Reputation: 1869

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Try Midland Tx, Lafayette La, both cities are oil hqtrs of their respective regions. Houston is another place that really has the oil and gas jobs. I am a former geologist caught in the bust of the mid 80's. Don't know the demand for these anymore, but there should be some.

Yes, a lot of the best positions require masters or better. I am only a BS myself, but did work in oil and gas in Louisiana (which for many years was the number 2 state in production) Don't know where we rank now, but still it is a major industry here. Good Luck!
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Old 07-10-2008, 09:42 PM
 
101 posts, read 270,796 times
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Smile I'd say Texas

Look at the oil companies. Here in Houston Shell is looking for geologist to survey the oil shale in Colorado. I heard....
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Old 07-10-2008, 09:43 PM
 
Location: Jersey City
6,489 posts, read 16,169,219 times
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When I think of quarrying I think of Upstate NY, Pennsylvania, West Virginia. Lots of that type of activity happening there. I don't know much about the industry, but U.S. Gypsum is certainly one of the larger companies on the East Coast. I see their trucks and some of their facilities in many parts of the region. Tilcon also has a lot of facilities around.
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Old 07-10-2008, 09:43 PM
 
2,502 posts, read 8,052,426 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by josehernandez017 View Post
Look at the oil companies. Here in Houston Shell is looking for geologist to survey the oil shale in Colorado. I heard....
I was actually about recommend Houston. I know that NASA uses geologists quite a bit. Landing a job there may be tough, but it would be pretty amazing.
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Old 07-11-2008, 09:47 AM
 
4 posts, read 38,865 times
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Wow--I didn't expect so many responses so quickly. Thanks for all the advice.

That said, I do wish my husband had gone to school for Civil Engineering. One of the biggest job barriers for him is that because he did not study hydrogeology and he does not have an interest in petroleum exploration (a dying field anyway), a civil engineer is qualified to do the same things he can and more...he has a lot of experience with CAD software and ArcGIS, but most of those jobs are for civil engineers and architechts. He has some interest in remediation, but the last job he had doing that was pretty terrible...

Thank you again for all the posts!
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Old 07-11-2008, 10:13 AM
Status: "0-0-2 Game On!" (set 7 days ago)
 
Location: The beautiful Rogue Valley, Oregon
7,311 posts, read 15,366,122 times
Reputation: 9503
Quote:
Originally Posted by kimstol View Post
Wow--I didn't expect so many responses so quickly. Thanks for all the advice.

That said, I do wish my husband had gone to school for Civil Engineering. One of the biggest job barriers for him is that because he did not study hydrogeology and he does not have an interest in petroleum exploration (a dying field anyway), a civil engineer is qualified to do the same things he can and more...he has a lot of experience with CAD software and ArcGIS, but most of those jobs are for civil engineers and architechts. He has some interest in remediation, but the last job he had doing that was pretty terrible...

Thank you again for all the posts!
If he's actually good at ArcGIS then a job working with county/city planning may well be a possibility. Geologists tend to be an outdoor breed (I say that as one) and working in a cubicle 8-5 often isn't our thing.

Civil Engineers have a much better "union" than geologists, and the ability to stamp things is extremely important for insurance liability. There are several school which have an Engineering Geology program in conjunction with a state license that actually gives an Engineering Geologist some of the same abilities.

Look into the AEG:
Home - Association of Environmental & Engineering Geologists (http://www.aegweb.org/i4a/pages/index.cfm?pageid=1 - broken link)
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Old 07-11-2008, 11:00 AM
 
Location: USA
2,779 posts, read 6,691,912 times
Reputation: 1869
Quote:
Originally Posted by kimstol View Post
Wow--I didn't expect so many responses so quickly. Thanks for all the advice.

That said, I do wish my husband had gone to school for Civil Engineering. One of the biggest job barriers for him is that because he did not study hydrogeology and he does not have an interest in petroleum exploration (a dying field anyway), a civil engineer is qualified to do the same things he can and more...he has a lot of experience with CAD software and ArcGIS, but most of those jobs are for civil engineers and architechts. He has some interest in remediation, but the last job he had doing that was pretty terrible...

Thank you again for all the posts!
Petroleum exploration is hardly a dying field as of late. Some activity like we haven't seen in years is going on in this part of the world. Of course the media won't brodcast the good news about energy; only the negative. Just thought I would set the record straight.
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Old 07-22-2008, 11:20 PM
 
10 posts, read 18,135 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kimstol View Post
Hello,

My husband is currently employed as a Geologist for a mid-size quarrying company. He has a B.S. and 3 years of experience. He commutes 1.5 hours each way every day to get to work. The city that the company is located in is an industrial town (low-income, not v. good schools, etc.) and we don't want to move there. When he has searched for other jobs, there really aren't any for a geologist in our state (Iowa). We are young and adventurous and willing to move pretty much anywhere in the U.S., as long as the town is comfortable and safe, with good schools for our daughter. Does anyone know of a state with a lot of jobs for geologists, or have any job leads for a mid-size town with a quarrying company? Thank you!
If you're truly adventurous and willing to make lots of $$$, head to the western U.S. (Alaska, Colorado, California,etc.). Mining and energy companies are looking for geologists so they can give them lotsa cash and work them many long hours. Cheers!
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