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Old 07-11-2008, 12:06 PM
 
Location: Houston
415 posts, read 391,349 times
Reputation: 41

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Quote:
Originally Posted by SBCA View Post
Here's why: If houston continued at it's current growth rate, it would have almost 5 million people by 2050, more than doubling it's current population. This growth is not sustainable, and certainly cannot continue indefinitely. Most demographic estimates would project a decline of the growth rate towards around 1% annually, significantly below it's current rate.

Certainly density in Houston is increasing, but a continuation of (or increase in) current growth rates would lead to unprecedented increases in population density (to around 8000 people per square mile in a 600 square mile city). This is not to say that Houston's overall population will decrease, just it's annual rate of growth.
Not entirely true. Houston right now is at about 4,000 people per square mile. I think that Houston will remain the same throughout 2020 (I'll be about 29 years old then, so hopefully I see this happen). The City of Houston should remain the same because there is still some land left in the NE and Southern parts of the city for development. Rail transit is expanding and there are many mixed-use developments going up in the core. Add to that, there are also mixed-use developments going up in the City of Houston, but away from the core. For example, this is one away from the core: CITYCENTRE - Houston, TX .

Things like this are continuing throughout the city, so I don't see it slowing down until sometime around 2020 (even then, Houston may possible host the World Fair in 2020, which will increase growth).

As for Chicago, how do you see it increasing?
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Old 07-11-2008, 01:26 PM
 
Location: Chicagoland
4,028 posts, read 6,400,657 times
Reputation: 1305
Not that I like it but I do think Houston will pass Chicago in population some time between 2020 and 2030. It could possibly even become the highest populated city in America because of the rapid growth of the state and the fact that it has 600 square miles to work with. That would be something.
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Old 07-11-2008, 01:30 PM
 
Location: Philadelphia, PA
343 posts, read 846,611 times
Reputation: 197
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kofi713 View Post
Things like this are continuing throughout the city, so I don't see it slowing down until sometime around 2020 (even then, Houston may possible host the World Fair in 2020, which will increase growth).

As for Chicago, how do you see it increasing?
It's very difficult to imagine a major US city of Houston's size maintaining a 2% annual growth rate for 25-30 years, which would have to occur if what you're saying is true. This is simply unprecedented.

Secondly, Chicago's population has already begun to increase again after reaching a nadir in 2006. Such a resurgence has been seen in many cities like Chicago. The renewed growth, while slow, is assured.
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Old 07-11-2008, 01:38 PM
 
1,743 posts, read 3,992,078 times
Reputation: 1431
Just an update....L.A currently has a population of

City (4 Million+)

County (10 Million+)

Greater L.A (18 Million+)
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Old 07-11-2008, 01:40 PM
 
Location: Philadelphia, PA
343 posts, read 846,611 times
Reputation: 197
Quote:
Originally Posted by Caliguy2007 View Post
Just an update....L.A currently has a population of

City (4 Million+)
Huh? Better check that figure again.
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Old 07-11-2008, 01:44 PM
 
Location: Oak Park, IL
5,522 posts, read 12,293,464 times
Reputation: 3827
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kofi713 View Post
As for Chicago, how do you see it increasing?
Chicago has plenty of vacant land remaining for construction of new housing. Much of the south and west sides of Chicago lost significant population and housing stock as the population decreased from its peak of 3.5 million. In the near south and west sides, new construction has added thousands of mid and high-rise units every year most of the past decade. Its possible, not saying its inevitable, but its possible that high fuel prices (among other factors) will continue to support the resurgence of central cities like Chicago which have good public transit access and very strong, concentrated employment districts.
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Old 07-11-2008, 02:02 PM
 
Location: SF Bay Area
15,470 posts, read 25,433,843 times
Reputation: 8936
Quote:
Originally Posted by SBCA View Post
Huh? Better check that figure again.
well not according to the US census but according to the CA Dept of Finance: L.A. climbs past 4 million - Los Angeles Times

And honestly I think the Census likes to screw CA. They split the Bay Area up into two metro regions as well as the LA/OC/Inland Empire/Ventura metro area into several metro regions to for god knows what reason.
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Old 07-11-2008, 02:05 PM
 
55 posts, read 64,283 times
Reputation: 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by SBCA View Post
Huh? Better check that figure again.
no hes right los angeles reached past 4 million people look it up
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Old 07-11-2008, 02:06 PM
 
Location: Miami
763 posts, read 3,226,641 times
Reputation: 257
Some good growth for Miami!
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Old 07-11-2008, 02:12 PM
 
55 posts, read 64,283 times
Reputation: 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by sav858 View Post
well not according to the US census but according to the CA Dept of Finance: L.A. climbs past 4 million - Los Angeles Times

And honestly I think the Census likes to screw CA. They split the Bay Area up into two metro regions as well as the LA/OC/Inland Empire/Ventura metro area into several metro regions to for god knows what reason.
its a discrepancy

Last edited by TYGA; 07-11-2008 at 02:21 PM..
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